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By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1992
Jerry and Judy Williamson felt a conventional home would look out of place on the wooded lot they own at Mount Gretna, Pa., near Manheim in Lancaster County.That's why, after five years of research, they decided to build a log home on the lot. Completed in December, the house illustrates several recent advances in log-home design and construction."Aluminum or vinyl siding wouldn't fit there," said Mr. Williamson, an engineer employed in Harrisburg, Pa. "The log house lends itself to the aesthetics."
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
In 1988, with only three months to relocate from Fort Monmouth, N.J., to Aberdeen, Stephen Hoffman and his wife, Sharon, set out to find a house in Maryland. The couple started their search with a historic house in Harford County that had been recorded in the Aberdeen Heritage Trust. According to the entry, the "Cole House" was originally a small log house, built in the mid-1700s on a parcel of some 100 acres that had been deeded to Col. James Cole. For the Hoffmans, it was a house with potential.
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BUSINESS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | August 23, 1992
Debbie Mullinix likes her new log home so much that she even mentions it in her answering machine's message."I'm probably sitting in my rocking chair on the porch of my new log home loving life," the recording explains to callers when Ms. Mullinix doesn't answer the phone.Owning a log home had long been a dream of the 37-year-old nurse at Montgomery General Hospital. She started researching the rustic residences 14 years ago, visiting log home milling plants, attending log home seminars and knocking on the doors of strangers to ask questions about their log homes.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
For more than 20 summers, Lenore Campbell and Leo Tims vacationed in a log cabin at Deep Creek Lake in Western Maryland. They were in love with a home for which the structure itself is a defining element of the decor. The emotional tug of a log house led them to build their own five years ago on a pastoral lot in Monkton. The enveloping warmth of the wood gives the IBM retirees the sense that their home is snuggling them. "When you walk in, it puts its arms around you," Tims said. Cabin-style houses, especially log houses, represent not only shelter but a lifestyle.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
McHENRY -- The view is remarkable. It stretches down over snow-covered slopes to Deep Creek Lake, now frozen solid. In the morning, Florence Colman and her husband, Tony, sit in bed drinking coffee and watch the sun come up over the mountains, spilling light onto the icy lake. "Every day the view is different," she says. Last winter the couple's weekend retreat was only a dream. (Their main house is in Gaithersburg.) For years the Colmans had come to Garrett County to vacation with their two sons, now grown.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2000
Allan Craig's affection for log homes goes way back to when he was a child gazing at the ceiling of a log cabin his parents partly owned in Canada. "I would look up at those beams, and I'd look up at the grain in the wood and I found it fascinating," Craig said. Later in life, when he and his wife, Carol, purchased a farm in Virginia as a vacation property, a log home is what he wanted to build. And as construction on their traditional log home - with a contemporary flair - in the Annapolis area finishes up, their love affair with log homes will have come full circle.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | February 5, 1995
Once upon a time, my family owned an old log cabin near the Gunpowder Falls. You could see the marks of the hand adz on its timbers, and know those trees had been felled before Lincoln was born. We went there in the summer for picnics and reunions, in the fall to watch the leaves shower down across the stream, in the winter to hear silence unbroken except for snow sliding off a branch. That cabin had the stark beauty that comes with paring everything away except what you must have -- warmth, shelter, light.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Stacy and Cindy Stacy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1996
Log homes in recent years have become a popular architectural style, suitable both for permanent residences and vacation retreats. They have also become almost synonymous with log homes built from prefabricated kits -- nice, but not authentic.Bob Benhoff's log cabin, perched atop a three-acre wooded site above the Potomac River in the mountains of Allegany County, is authentic -- a labor of love and, he says, "the product of a frustrated architect."There never was and never will be anything pre-fab about Benhoff's "dream cabin," as his companion in retirement, Louise News, calls the four-year building project.
BUSINESS
By DEIDRE NERREAU MCCABE and DEIDRE NERREAU MCCABE,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
Twelve years ago, the Caples of Westminster bought an 1850s brick mill house on 5 bucolic acres, complete with stream and small wooden bridge that they crossed on their way up the driveway.They loved the five-room, three-level house, which had been renovated before they moved in. But after their first child was born, they started thinking about an addition."We needed more space. We didn't have a dining room and we only had two bedrooms," says Robin Spampinato Caple.The Caples considered building a two-level brick addition that would blend easily with the existing structure, but eventually decided on a more creative solution -- using a log home of similar vintage to solve their space problems.
BUSINESS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1996
Libby Ballenger's Winfield log house combines the airy informality of a beach house with the owner's love of rustic furnishings. The result is a home that seems to welcome the best of every season.On a recent afternoon, a gentle breeze passed through Ballenger's living room while sunlight cast a golden glow on the southern white pine logs with which the house is built. In winter, she said, the same room becomes a cozy haven from the cold outside, warmed by the cheery wood stove that sits on the large stone hearth.
BUSINESS
By John Handley and John Handley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
Hurricane season arrives June 1, conjuring up images of last year's disastrous storms, which fueled a new urgency for making housing safer. Government forecasters are warning that the 2005 hurricane season could be just as bad as last year's, which produced 15 named storms, nine of them hurricanes. In Florida, 27,000 homes were destroyed, causing $45 billion in property damage. And in 2003, Tropical Storm Isabel damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes in Maryland. Also, each year about 1,000 tornadoes touch down in the United States.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
McHENRY -- The view is remarkable. It stretches down over snow-covered slopes to Deep Creek Lake, now frozen solid. In the morning, Florence Colman and her husband, Tony, sit in bed drinking coffee and watch the sun come up over the mountains, spilling light onto the icy lake. "Every day the view is different," she says. Last winter the couple's weekend retreat was only a dream. (Their main house is in Gaithersburg.) For years the Colmans had come to Garrett County to vacation with their two sons, now grown.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2000
Allan Craig's affection for log homes goes way back to when he was a child gazing at the ceiling of a log cabin his parents partly owned in Canada. "I would look up at those beams, and I'd look up at the grain in the wood and I found it fascinating," Craig said. Later in life, when he and his wife, Carol, purchased a farm in Virginia as a vacation property, a log home is what he wanted to build. And as construction on their traditional log home - with a contemporary flair - in the Annapolis area finishes up, their love affair with log homes will have come full circle.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Stacy and Cindy Stacy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1996
Log homes in recent years have become a popular architectural style, suitable both for permanent residences and vacation retreats. They have also become almost synonymous with log homes built from prefabricated kits -- nice, but not authentic.Bob Benhoff's log cabin, perched atop a three-acre wooded site above the Potomac River in the mountains of Allegany County, is authentic -- a labor of love and, he says, "the product of a frustrated architect."There never was and never will be anything pre-fab about Benhoff's "dream cabin," as his companion in retirement, Louise News, calls the four-year building project.
BUSINESS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1996
Libby Ballenger's Winfield log house combines the airy informality of a beach house with the owner's love of rustic furnishings. The result is a home that seems to welcome the best of every season.On a recent afternoon, a gentle breeze passed through Ballenger's living room while sunlight cast a golden glow on the southern white pine logs with which the house is built. In winter, she said, the same room becomes a cozy haven from the cold outside, warmed by the cheery wood stove that sits on the large stone hearth.
BUSINESS
By DEIDRE NERREAU MCCABE and DEIDRE NERREAU MCCABE,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
Twelve years ago, the Caples of Westminster bought an 1850s brick mill house on 5 bucolic acres, complete with stream and small wooden bridge that they crossed on their way up the driveway.They loved the five-room, three-level house, which had been renovated before they moved in. But after their first child was born, they started thinking about an addition."We needed more space. We didn't have a dining room and we only had two bedrooms," says Robin Spampinato Caple.The Caples considered building a two-level brick addition that would blend easily with the existing structure, but eventually decided on a more creative solution -- using a log home of similar vintage to solve their space problems.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Contributing Writer | August 9, 1992
Like dollhouses, some dream homes come in boxes. In the early part of the century, a two-room, no-bath cottage could have been snapped up from a Sears mail-order catalog for $146.25, not much more than some hobbyists might pay today for a miniature counterpart.Between 1908 and 1937, Sears, Roebuck & Co. sold more than 100,000 houses by mail. Among some 450 models available was a modern, two-story, eight-room home for $1,400 and "The Magnolia," a 10-room Southern Colonial mansion, which sold for $5,140 in 1918.
BUSINESS
By John Handley and John Handley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
Hurricane season arrives June 1, conjuring up images of last year's disastrous storms, which fueled a new urgency for making housing safer. Government forecasters are warning that the 2005 hurricane season could be just as bad as last year's, which produced 15 named storms, nine of them hurricanes. In Florida, 27,000 homes were destroyed, causing $45 billion in property damage. And in 2003, Tropical Storm Isabel damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes in Maryland. Also, each year about 1,000 tornadoes touch down in the United States.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
WOODSBORO -- Doug Claytor and Judy Candela expect to pay off their mortgage next month -- and then step up plans to tear down their house.The Frederick County couple have no choice if they want to save their historic, 18th-century log house, known as Wolf's Delight. They have to move it or lose it."Once we get it moved, it won't matter how long it takes to rebuild. I'm devoting the rest of my life to it. It's my job. My avocation is now my vocation," said Mr. Claytor, 39, a professional house restorer who took on the daunting project as a labor of love.
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