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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | February 21, 2010
Years after it survived a fire, was dismantled and hauled away, a landmark of the East Towson African-American community is coming home. The so-called Jacob House, a 19th-century log cabin about the size of a living room, is expected back in town this summer, when the timbers will be driven down from near Mercersburg, Pa., unloaded from a truck and put back together a few blocks from the site where it stood until 2001. "It's part of our history, it's something that's been in the neighborhood," said Adelaide Bentley, a lifelong resident of East Towson who has been part of a years-long effort by citizens and Baltimore County government to salvage the cabin and find a place for it. "Let the people of East Towson know what their ancestors did."
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
Low gray clouds of a late autumn day appear to envelop a two-story cedar cottage and its attached one-story log cabin. Sitting on three acres in Howard County and accessed through a wrought-iron arch down a narrow lane, the property has been the home of 63-year-old Priscilla Griffith for most of her adult life. A roughly landscaped front garden contains the print of a fenced-in vegetable patch, harvested months ago. The path to the cottage is a dirt one; a brick walkway from its side entrance leads to the main house.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 3, 1995
When Carroll County Farm Museum opens tomorrow for the 1995 season, the "fur trader's cabin" will appear in a new role as a 19th-century one-room schoolhouse.Staff members converted the small building -- it measures 19 feet 4 inches by 15 feet 3 inches -- to give visitors a taste of early American education. The school will feature a replica of a schoolmaster's or schoolmarm's desk made by an assistant county attorney whose hobby is woodworking."This is just something I've thought would be good for the farm museum, because we have so many schoolchildren who don't know that there were one-room schools," said Dottie Freeman, the farm museum's administrator.
EXPLORE
By Oluwatosin Fakile | November 7, 2011
A log cabin home that dates back to 1790 and is now owned by Bethany Community Church has been nearly restored and the project was unveiled to the community last month. The cabin, known as the Caleb Carr House and named after its original owner, was part of 24 acres of land donated to Bethany Community Church in the 1990s by the sons of the late James Smith, James Smith II and Winslow Smith. As part of their donation, James and Winslow Smith required that the church restore the cabin.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | October 21, 1990
When the show house season descends on Baltimore, you can bet that decorators will strut their stuff. This year is no exception.Usually the subject house is an old-timer that somebody has just moved out of or into -- a space large and fireplaced, porched and pantried. Just as often, it is a structure that has seen better days, sort of brown around the edges like an old gardenia and largely in need of a cosmetic transplant.This year Historic Ellicott City Inc. has trotted out a circa-1815 log cabin with several thousand square feet of terraced additions thrusting dramatically up a steep, deep draw, high above the Patapsco River.
NEWS
August 3, 1993
A Washington entrepreneur plans to ship a 140-year-old log cabin from New Windsor to Sofia to set up what he claims will be the first American-style restaurant in the Bulgarian capital.The two-story, 20-by-24-foot log farm house, now in storage in a garage, will house The Log Cabin Restaurant, featuring such Maryland dishes as soft-shell crabs and roast turkey.Cuisine from Virginia and North Carolina will also be served in the restaurant, which will be decorated with early American furniture, memorabilia and photographs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 3, 1991
Harry and Doris Rink open their Gibbstown, N.J., home -- which includes the oldest log cabin in North America -- to tourists any time they are home.Once, a British woman stopped in after midnight, and she got a tour, Mr. Rink says.Recently, the Rinks had 200 more visitors (they get 2,000 to 5,000 a year) when, in a mixing of cultures, Lithuanian-Americans held a celebration in the little cabin Finnish woodsmen built about 1640 during the Swedish settlement of New Jersey.It was the fifth year that the Rinks, whose heritage is German, have hosted a December cultural celebration, an event sponsored by the Greenwich Township Cultural and Heritage Committee.
FEATURES
By Arthur S. Harris Jr. and Arthur S. Harris Jr.,Contributing Writer | June 14, 1992
In this day of glitzy spa vacations with Jacuzzis and exercise machines, the prospect of holing up in an authentic log cabin named Possum or Woodchuck might seem suitable only for nostalgia buffs. But the rustic Vermont log cabin enclave of Roaring Branch appeals to those looking for an escape -- from the hustle-bustle of daily life.Sure, the floors tilt slightly. But what would you expect from a dozen log cabins scattered among pines that were built about 80 years ago and have settled a bit unevenly?
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | May 12, 1996
It began as the most basic of weekend retreats -- a rustic cabin deep in the woods of Western Maryland.The owners, a family of four, wanted all the creature comforts that would enable themselves and their guests to "rough it" in style.But they didn't want to lose the spirit of rugged camp buildings dating from the turn of the century.The result is a mountainside compound that elevates the log cabin to a new level of luxury while reinterpreting it for the 1990s.It's the only building in Maryland this year to receive the highest tribute in American architecture -- a 1996 honor award from the American Institute of Architects.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2001
Someone purposely set a blaze that destroyed an irreplaceable log cabin venerated as one of the oldest buildings in Howard County, fire officials said yesterday. Preservationists, depressed to hear that the Sunday morning fire was the act of an arsonist, are mourning the loss, noting that estimates date the structure's origins to the late 1600s. That would have made the humble, hand-built cabin old when the United States sprang to life. It survived war, weather and neglect - only to fall in flames a few weeks after the county Department of Recreation and Parks began restoring it as a museum.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | February 21, 2010
Years after it survived a fire, was dismantled and hauled away, a landmark of the East Towson African-American community is coming home. The so-called Jacob House, a 19th-century log cabin about the size of a living room, is expected back in town this summer, when the timbers will be driven down from near Mercersburg, Pa., unloaded from a truck and put back together a few blocks from the site where it stood until 2001. "It's part of our history, it's something that's been in the neighborhood," said Adelaide Bentley, a lifelong resident of East Towson who has been part of a years-long effort by citizens and Baltimore County government to salvage the cabin and find a place for it. "Let the people of East Towson know what their ancestors did."
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | July 20, 2008
Stories about the white clapboard house at the former Pleasant Grove Farm in Owings Mills abound, including that Confederate soldiers sought food and horses from the anti-slavery family of Richard Scott and that Confederate sympathizers tore down his flagpole because he flew a U.S. flag. Alex and Rob Shek love older homes and, as the couple house-hunted a decade ago, they fell for this one, which seems a world away from the road. "We walked in it once and bought it the same day. We bought it for the charm," said Alex Shek.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | May 30, 2008
In 1982, Nancy Thompson and her husband, Rick, purchased something she always wanted - a historic home in the country. Twenty-six years later, Calvert County's Little Cove Farm, circa 1820, continues to delight the couple through the ups and downs of continuing restoration, extensive landscaping and open houses, as in the recent Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage tour. "We were tearing off siding two weeks before the tour," Thompson said. "Thank goodness, my husband is into this. He's willing to sacrifice along with me to get things for the home."
NEWS
September 21, 2007
A memorial service will be held on Friday, September 21, 2007 at 11 am at St. Augustine's Episcopal Church, Cayot's Corner Rd. (Rt. 310) & Mitton Rd., Chesapeake City, MD 21915, with a small reception following in the log cabin. Arrangements by McCRERY FUNERAL HOMES.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
Bernard Rudell earned $30 a week in the 1940s making pieces of chocolate, when the average wage-earner made only $15. Eventually he began selling chocolates on the side, launching his candy-making repertoire with chocolate Easter bunnies. He would make enough bunnies to fill a table that he was setting up on a street corner in front of his father's jewelry store. The bunnies were an instant hit, said Bernard's wife Edna Rudell. "He sold everything he made," said the 84-year-old Jacksonville resident.
NEWS
June 6, 2006
Man fatally wounded on lot near nightclub A 25-year-old man was fatally shot in the head and another man wounded on a downtown parking lot early yesterday as a crowd was leaving a nearby nightclub. Wayne Matthews Jr. of the 2800 block of Carver Road in Cherry Hill was found lying between two parked cars near Club One in the 300 block of Guilford Ave. about 1:50 a.m., police said. It is not known whether Matthews had been in the club before he was shot. He was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital at 2:27 a.m., police said.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 8, 2002
Call it the ultimate in retro chic. Plopped between three 19th-century loft buildings and the former Crazy John's carryout shop on Baltimore's west side is an unlikely symbol of urban renewal - a full-scale replica of a log cabin. Is it an early American branch of the children's museum? Clandestine meeting place for "off-the-grid" survivalists? Memorial to the early settlers? Did some wayward descendents of Daniel Boone take a wrong turn at the Harbor Tunnel and decide to set up camp?
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2004
Sandwiched in the drywall of a farmhouse and caught between historical preservation and commercial development is a log cabin no one can see. Yet its murky historical background has created a bit of controversy. Since the 1800s, the log cabin has been a point of county pride and infamy: It was once home to great American actors Junius Brutus and Edwin Booth, as well as assassin John Wilkes Booth. Or so area residents believed, until a historical architect and a historical writer questioned its origin.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2004
Sandwiched in the drywall of a farmhouse and caught between historical preservation and commercial development is a log cabin no one can see. Yet its murky historical background has created a bit of controversy. Since the 1800s, the log cabin has been a point of county pride and infamy: It was once home to great American actors Junius Brutus and Edwin Booth, as well as assassin John Wilkes Booth. Or so area residents believed, until a historical architect and a historical writer questioned its origin.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
MARYLAND'S governor and legislature, by passing the "flush tax," have taken a bold new step to clean up sewage. But now's no time to smell the roses. It's time now to tackle manure - the back side of foamy white milk and luscious golden chicken - flowing bounteously from farms throughout the bay's six-state watershed. I have nothing against manure. It smells like home to me. Mom would corral me as a toddler in the feed bin as she pushed it through our chicken houses. When we cleaned the houses out, the dog and I reveled in the fragrant piles outside our log cabin (yes, log cabin - it's still on Spearin Road near Salisbury - and no, I'm not 100 years old)
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