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By New York Times News Service | September 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After developing several successful residential and commercial properties in transitional neighborhoods, Columbia Associates expected their loft apartments in a renovated 1891 brick schoolhouse to sell quickly.But after four months on the market, the Morgan Annex condominiums are only 25 percent sold.David Miller and his partners, Kenton Campbell and Tom Glass, specialize in developing projects in emerging neighborhoods. All live within three blocks of the Morgan Annex, and they develop only projects within 10 blocks of their homes.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
The Target opening this fall in Canton at one of the city's largest new retail developments will be joined by a Harris Teeter grocery store and a lineup of stores and restaurants that includes Old Navy, Michaels, Loft, ULTA Beauty and Red Robin Gourmet Burgers. The developer of The Shops at Canton Crossing announced those tenants and others Monday and said it has leases or commitments for most of the 325,000-square-foot-center under way on Boston Street. Construction has begun on a 135,000-square-foot Target and some of the other stores, while Harris Teeter will start construction on a store in the next few weeks.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
Eighteen months after announcing plans to turn Baltimore's west side into a new neighborhood called "UniversityCenter," a consortium of city, state and private officials is living up to its promises.Cranes are high in the sky over construction sites of the $90 million Homer Gudelsky Inpatient Tower, an expansion of the University of Maryland Medical Center, and the $50 million Health Sciences Facility, part of the University of Maryland at Baltimore.Legislators this spring approved $40.4 million for a Medical Biotechnology Center and nearly $1 million to design a $28 million Health Sciences Library and computer center.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
It appears that the world's most decorated Olympian has moved into a stylish loft just steps from one of Baltimore's liveliest locales. Though Swimmer Michael Phelps has not confirmed details about his new abode, it seems to be an open secret among Canton's locals that Phelps is living in a million-dollar compound on South Curley Street. The amalgam of red brick buildings that neighbors say Phelps has called home since before the London Olympics is just off O'Donnell Square, a park ringed by bars and restaurants.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2002
MANY PEOPLE dream by the beach during the summer, but few run with those musings months later. That's what Westminster resident Melissa Shaffer did when she opened the Pottery Loft on Main Street. On Nov. 15, with hot cider and shortbread, and soothing music playing, Shaffer opened what she and others describe as a "stress-free place to have fun and explore your creativity." The Pottery Loft provides more than 100 pieces of unfinished pottery for customers to paint, sponge or stencil at their whim.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
Larry Leonard Jr. doesn't care which boat wins the America's Cup, just as long as his sails are on board.Mr. Leonard's Sobstad Sailmakers Chesapeake has provided more sails for this year's America's Cup competitors than any other loft, rival sailmakers say. And his Annapolis loft is the exclusive supplier for Kansas billionaire Bill Koch's Women's Challenge."
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1998
If the hundreds of people who walk along the the 300 block of N. Charles St. every day would look up instead of down at the sidewalk, they'd be in for a surprise.First they'd realize that above the block's storefronts are some of Baltimore's finest old houses. If they looked closer, they'd notice four window boxes with brightly colored flowers on the second floor above The Silk Road Restaurant.The passers-by would be amazed to find out that behind those four windows, above the bustle and traffic of Charles Street, is a huge, imaginatively designed loft residence.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | February 13, 2008
Last year, Dr. Gavin Hamilton lived on the 17th floor of a new building in Baltimore's trendy Harbor East community. This year, the 32-year-old specialist in internal medicine found an apartment he likes even more -- a converted loft in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. He's so pleased with it, he's throwing an Oscar party to show it off to his friends. "I like the layout and the high ceilings and the way they preserved the industrial feel of the building," he said. Plus, "it's on the route of the Hopkins shuttle and an easy walk to the train station and Tapas Teatro and the Charles Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | July 9, 2000
For more than 20 years, local architects and developers have been converting Baltimore's old loft buildings to apartments. Now a local design firm is developing plans to create apartments that have the look and feel of converted lofts -- but within an entirely new structure. Call them faux lofts. Or residences in the Neo-Loft style. The Lofts at Lexington is the name of a $30 million, 238-unit apartment building that Hord Coplan Macht of Baltimore is designing for Pennrose Properties Inc. of Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
Federal Hill's historic Southway Bowling Center is closing to be converted into upscale loft apartments. And Alva Brown, duckpin hall-of-famer in the city where the sport was born, said it's a tragedy. "Feel bad for the kids," said Brown, 78, who runs the 61-year-old southern Baltimore landmark with her son. "Where are they going to go?" Duckpin bowling is a celebrated Baltimore pastime that, according to local lore, was invented at a Howard Street tavern a century ago by Orioles John McGraw and Wilbert Robinson.
SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Rij Patel is every golf coach's nightmare. His swing is as unconventional as they come. Rij describes it as "weird" and "bad," and it's enough to make nearby golfers do a double take. But their amusement turns to awe as his contorted clubface finally straightens itself out at the last possible moment before impact. Rij is also every coach's dream. As metal meets ball, one can't help but wonder how such power comes from the Rij's frame - small, even for a 14-year-old. He's mature beyond his years, is intelligent and spends much of his time practicing at Hunt Valley Golf Club, where he and his parents belong.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2011
Virginia Jefferson spent the past 65 years putting her customers in the dark. As the proprietor of an old Baltimore awning company, it was her role to spread the shade on the hottest of summer afternoons. About to turn 89, she is retiring and selling a business founded by her father in 1917. This week, she will leave an office that has never seen a computer and the desk where she has worked since 1946. She'll surrender her electric typewriter, carbon paper and ledger books filled with the names of the 500 people who have relied on her to screen their homes under one of her tentlike, custom-tailored enclosures supported by pipes and lashed with ropes.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Five months ago, Neil and Whitney Bourdelaise decided their future lay across the Chesapeake Bridge in a waterfront home in Queen Anne's County that was calling out to them. The couple rented out their Severna Park home and relocated to a distinctive, barn-like structure on a half-acre with panoramic water views. "We came from a split-foyer [design] home, that was expensive to cool, to this house on the water where we get breezes all of the time," said 30-year-old Whitney Bourdelaise, who runs a health and wellness business from their new home.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
Ask Bonnie Benedetta to describe her style, and she laughingly answers, "Cheap. Cheap, but good." The friends she was meeting at Little Havana the night we "Glimpsed" the Catonsville resident say she's feminine and put-together. The 43-year-old sales representative for George Marshall says she loves dresses and skirts, but she doesn't like spending a lot on her look. She's an expert at finding a deal - and dealing with hand-me-downs. The look: Lilac short-sleeve button-down New York & Company shirt.
NEWS
June 25, 2009
New York's Lower East Side was a run-down neighborhood blighted by crime and decay before young artists began moving in during the 1970s and turned the place into a lively entertainment destination. An infusion of creative types in the 1990s transformed Washington's distressed U Street corridor into a dynamic cultural hub. Now Baltimore is aiming to engineer a similar urban renaissance in the long-beleaguered Greenmount West neighborhood, which forms the eastern half of the city's fledgling Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,rsca@ritastclair.com | October 25, 2008
The high ceilings in the loft to which we recently moved make our low-slung modern furniture seem badly out of scale. I've learned from magazines that this problem can be effectively addressed by painting the ceiling a dark color. OK, but how should I display my collection of ceramics? None of the items is especially large but each can be clearly seen from a few feet away. Without knowing the room's actual dimensions or - most importantly - its lighting array, the best I can offer are some general thoughts as well as a photo of a setting that may have similarities to your own. This image comes from The Nest Home Design Handbook, written by Carley Roney and published by Clarkson Potter.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 16, 2004
Live next to the Mayor," suggests the sign on a historic loft building one block from Baltimore's City Hall. That's not actually what people will be able to do in this building, since there's another structure between it and City Hall, and Mayor Martin O'Malley doesn't live in City Hall anyway. Nonetheless, the sign heralds one of the more intriguing designs to be proposed this year for a local building conversion. Instead of creating residences entirely within the shell of the old manufacturing plant, the development team is building penthouses that will appear to be bursting from its roof.
BUSINESS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
Steve Yasko and Mario Gentile have plenty of reasons to be happy with their three-bedroom home in Piney Orchard, Anne Arundel County. Their brick Colonial sits on a quiet, tree-lined road. They have a yard and a finished basement. They're even on the brink of paying off their mortgage early. But they have a dream: To live in a 2,000-square-foot, high-ceilinged, wide-open city apartment. Sure, it would be more expensive than their current digs. But it would be a loft. "It is the creativity, the flexibility of this space" that makes them drool, said Yasko, the station manager at Towson University's WTMD-FM.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | February 13, 2008
Last year, Dr. Gavin Hamilton lived on the 17th floor of a new building in Baltimore's trendy Harbor East community. This year, the 32-year-old specialist in internal medicine found an apartment he likes even more -- a converted loft in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. He's so pleased with it, he's throwing an Oscar party to show it off to his friends. "I like the layout and the high ceilings and the way they preserved the industrial feel of the building," he said. Plus, "it's on the route of the Hopkins shuttle and an easy walk to the train station and Tapas Teatro and the Charles Theatre.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | October 28, 2007
Keith Huot first sighted the neat little house in the forest while cycling along Providence Road in Baltimore County. He learned from others that the house was for sale and that potential buyers were talking about knocking it down. "I felt like I could save something unique," says Huot. So he and his wife, Amy, decided to buy the circa-1950 house, which had about 1,000 square feet with just one bedroom -- in a loft -- and one bath. A nice, cozy dwelling for a couple. But when daughter Maddie came along, the Huots needed to expand the space.
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