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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
MINNEAPOLIS -- When Orioles left-hander Adam Loewen returns from the disabled list in a few weeks, it will be as a reliever for the rest of the season. Beyond that, Loewen's specific role with the Orioles is unclear. Orioles manager Dave Trembley confirmed yesterday that Loewen (left elbow soreness) will pitch exclusively as a reliever for the Orioles after he spends roughly three weeks on a minor league rehabilitation assignment at Single-A Frederick, Double-A Bowie and eventually Triple-A Norfolk.
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By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
BOWIE -- As a free-agent outfielder playing in Venezuela last winter, Adam Loewen hoped to show enough to earn a chance in spring training. And then he realized that his best shot to get back to the major leagues might be what originally got him there: his prized left arm. Now with the Reading Fightin Phils, the Philadelphia Phillies' Double-A affiliate, Loewen came with his team to Double-A Bowie this week. "It's like I'm starting over every five years at something different," Loewen said Tuesday.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2008
Orioles pitcher Adam Loewen is taking his throwing program on the road, with the first stop being Baltimore next week before he eventually reports to spring training. Seven months after having a screw surgically implanted in his left elbow, Loewen will continue his workouts in front of head trainer Richie Bancells and assistant Brian Ebel. They'll check to make sure some recent tightness in his shoulder is nothing more than the normal discomfort that comes from a long layoff. "Every time I throw, it gets looser and looser," he said from his Vancouver, British Columbia, home.
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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
More than 1,000 mourners gathered Wednesday at the U.S. Naval Academy chapel to say goodbye to Midshipman Hans P. Loewen, remembered as an adventurous, vibrant, funny man whose company mates summed him up in a phrase: "Live like a warrior. " Loewen, 20, of Hampstead, N.C., a midshipman third class majoring in oceanography who was planning to graduate in 2016, died March 29, a week after a skateboarding accident at Assateague State Park left him in a coma. He was the third midshipman to die this year - one was killed in an accident and another, an academy football player, collapsed last month on a practice field suffering brain swelling and bleeding; he died three days later.
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By PETER SCHMUCK and PETER SCHMUCK,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
News item: Former top Orioles pitching prospect Adam Loewen passed up a minor league deal with the club to continue his comeback as a position player with the Toronto Blue Jays. My take: Sure, I'm a little surprised he didn't show more loyalty to the O's, who stood by him through thick and thin, but it's not as if he's a traitor. It's also not as if it's going to make a difference in the greater scheme of things. Rick Ankiel comes along only once in a generation. News item: Oakland Raiders fans have been coming out of the woodwork since I poked fun at them in my blog (which you should click on as soon as you finish reading this)
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By PETER SCHMUCK | June 4, 2006
So, what do the Orioles do now? What do you do when you watch Adam Loewen look like every bit the inexperienced young pitcher that he is, yet still pitch well enough that he probably deserves to stay in the rotation? That's the issue facing Orioles manager Sam Perlozzo and pitching coach Leo Mazzone, or at least that's the issue that should be facing them. They have indicated that Bruce Chen likely will reclaim his slot later this week, though he is 0-5 and still trying to figure out what happened to his command.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2008
The addition of a left-hander to the Orioles' bullpen yesterday coincided with the loss of another. Adam Loewen returned from his injury rehabilitation assignment and the Orioles activated him from the disabled list. To make room on the roster, they placed Jamie Walker on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to Thursday, with inflammation in his left elbow. Loewen allowed one earned run in 9 2/3 innings in nine minor league games, the first three at Single-A Frederick and the final six at Double-A Bowie.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
In his 22 years as a major league hitting coach, Terry Crowley has not faced a challenge like the one that awaits him with Adam Loewen, the former Orioles pitcher who's trying to save his career by becoming a position player. Crowley usually works with players who have been swinging a bat uninterrupted for years. Loewen hasn't done it on a consistent basis since he enrolled at Chipola Junior College in Florida, where he played first base on the days he wasn't pitching. Once Loewen signed with the Orioles, who made him the fourth overall pick in the 2002 draft, he committed to the mound.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | July 9, 2008
TORONTO - The Orioles received daunting news regarding left-hander Adam Loewen yesterday, but the club has not officially ruled him out for the rest of the season. Orioles manager Dave Trembley said a CT scan taken Monday showed further injury to a previous stress fracture in Loewen's throwing elbow, meaning Loewen will be sidelined indefinitely until he decides on a course of action. Loewen has consulted with club orthopedist John Wilckens and is expected to call Dr. James Andrews, the renowned Alabama surgeon who inserted a screw in Loewen's elbow in June 2007.
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By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
You could make a case that losing a player whose pitching career has gone bust, and whose career as a fielder has barely started and is nowhere close to guaranteed, is no reflection on the organization that lost him. Tough break, and better luck with the next player you're trying to keep, or attract. The Orioles had better hope the rest of baseball buys that argument. Available players now and in the future, in particular. Their own, such as Brian Roberts or Nick Markakis, for example.
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The Orioles have lost so often and in so many ways in recent years at Rogers Centre that squandering myriad offensive opportunities and blowing a late lead like they did to the Toronto Blue Jays in Sunday's 6-5 defeat seem rather pedestrian. These Orioles, though, are seemingly a creative bunch, and they added a new wrinkle Sunday afternoon: Allowing their former top pitching prospect to hit the first homer of his big league career in a game-changing moment. With the Orioles clinging to a one-run lead in the seventh, starter Tommy Hunter served up a 400-foot-plus shot to Adam Loewen, the Orioles' first-rounder in 2002 who is making his comeback as an outfielder after elbow injuries derailed his mound career.
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Adam Loewen said he's not as emotional this weekend as he was Wednesday, when he made his debut as an outfielder for the Toronto Blue Jays — more than three years after he pitched his final game for the Orioles. But he's not acting like facing his old club is routine. "I came up with the Orioles. I still watch a lot of their games because I am pretty much a fan of the Orioles. I was drafted by them, I know all the guys. I know the awesome people in the organization that are running it now," Loewen, the fourth overall pick in the 2002 draft who never realized his pitching potential because of injuries, said Friday.
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By DAVID STEELE | April 2, 2009
Hayden Penn is gone from the Orioles. That makes Penn look bad, and makes Andy MacPhail look pretty good, for right now. As for Mike Flanagan, Jim Beattie and Jim Duquette, if you see them, give them a hug. They don't look bad or good in light of this, just unlucky. It was on their collective watches, in various combinations from roughly 2002 to 2007, that Penn joined with Erik Bedard, Adam Loewen and Daniel Cabrera as the Rotation of the Future, the one around which the renaissance of the Orioles was being built.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK and PETER SCHMUCK,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
News item: Former top Orioles pitching prospect Adam Loewen passed up a minor league deal with the club to continue his comeback as a position player with the Toronto Blue Jays. My take: Sure, I'm a little surprised he didn't show more loyalty to the O's, who stood by him through thick and thin, but it's not as if he's a traitor. It's also not as if it's going to make a difference in the greater scheme of things. Rick Ankiel comes along only once in a generation. News item: Oakland Raiders fans have been coming out of the woodwork since I poked fun at them in my blog (which you should click on as soon as you finish reading this)
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
You could make a case that losing a player whose pitching career has gone bust, and whose career as a fielder has barely started and is nowhere close to guaranteed, is no reflection on the organization that lost him. Tough break, and better luck with the next player you're trying to keep, or attract. The Orioles had better hope the rest of baseball buys that argument. Available players now and in the future, in particular. Their own, such as Brian Roberts or Nick Markakis, for example.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 25, 2008
The news that Adam Loewen has signed with the Blue Jays is a little bit of a shock - and it probably could be interpreted by the Orioles' front office as a slap in the face - but it's not exactly a setback for the organization. In fact, you can make the case that Loewen did the O's a favor by jumping ship, since the odds of his actually becoming a serviceable position player at the major league level remain quite long. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | May 1, 2008
A bone scan on Orioles pitcher Adam Loewen's left elbow has come back clear. Too bad the reason for his discomfort can't be described as the same. Loewen, who was removed from last Thursday's start in the third inning and placed on the 15-day disabled list, is scheduled to visit Dr. James Andrews on Monday in Birmingham, Ala. Andrews performed the surgery in June that included the insertion of a screw in Loewen's elbow. The only positive development this week is that the bone scan, a CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging haven't revealed a fracture.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | March 17, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Pitcher Adam Loewen emerged from his bullpen session yesterday feeling better about his left shoulder, and about the decision made by the Orioles to skip his turn in the rotation. Loewen remains scheduled to start Wednesday after throwing 45 pitches, mixing in everything and impressing bullpen coach Alan Dunn, who passed along a glowing report to manager Dave Trembley. "It was great," Trembley said. "Alan Dunn said that's the best he's seen him throw all spring.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
If Adam Loewen is going to make a successful transition into a power-hitting outfielder or first baseman, it won't be in an Orioles uniform. In a surprising development, Loewen confirmed yesterday that he has signed a minor league contract with the Toronto Blue Jays, turning down an offer from the Orioles, who were confident they would be able to retain their 2002 first-round draft pick. "It was a lot tougher decision than when I decided to hang up pitching for my career," Loewen said.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | October 21, 2008
To make room on their 40-man roster for a quintet of injured pitchers, the Orioles released 2002 first-round draft pick Adam Loewen yesterday and outrighted five players to Triple-A. Loewen's release essentially terminates the left-hander's major league contract but almost certainly does not mean the end of his relationship with the organization, club president Andy MacPhail said. "This was something that was talked about ... and was expected by both the player and his representative," MacPhail said.
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