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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | April 19, 2008
As he prepared to preside over his last Passover services at Beth El synagogue in Pikesville, Rabbi Mark Loeb allowed himself to consider the opportunities and the responsibilities that come with freedom - his own and the human family's. "Most people think the story is the Haggadah, where we say God gets the people out of bondage. We celebrate it, and happy days are here again. That's not it," Loeb said, referring to Passover. "Liberation from bondage only takes you away from oppression, but it doesn't liberate your soul to dream about how to live your life."
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NEWS
October 15, 2009
On October 7, 2009, Rabbi Mark Loeb, Funeral services will be held at Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Avenue (21208) on Thursday, October 15 at 1 P.M. Interment Beth El Memorial Park,- Randallstown. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Rabbi Mark Gordon Loeb Memorial Fund, Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21208 or MAZON, 10495 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025. Family and friends will be receiving visitors at Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Avenue (21208)
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FEATURES
By Rod Harmon and Rod Harmon,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | December 16, 2002
Lisa Loeb is such a girly-girl. She loves The Bachelor. She bakes cakes for friends. Her '60s-retro glasses and flip hairstyle give her an innocent look, like the shy classmate who was sweet to everyone and preferred reading to going to pep rallies. And she loves Hello Kitty. Her home is filled with the round-faced feline, from watches and leg warmers to purses and waffle makers. For her latest album, Hello Lisa (Artemis Records), Loeb took her innocent persona to the nth level by combining her two loves.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
As Rabbi Mark G. Loeb neared retirement last year, members of Beth El Congregation were given the opportunity to write letters describing what he had meant to them, a way in which he had come to their aid or a moment in which he had touched their lives. The request drew hundreds of responses. "It was just astonishing to him, the things that people remembered and the things that he had done that he didn't remember himself," said Rabbi Steven Schwartz, who succeeded Rabbi Loeb as senior rabbi at the state's largest Jewish congregation.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
As Rabbi Mark G. Loeb neared retirement last year, members of Beth El Congregation were given the opportunity to write letters describing what he had meant to them, a way in which he had come to their aid or a moment in which he had touched their lives. The request drew hundreds of responses. "It was just astonishing to him, the things that people remembered and the things that he had done that he didn't remember himself," said Rabbi Steven Schwartz, who succeeded Rabbi Loeb as senior rabbi at the state's largest Jewish congregation.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
Scalpel in hand, Dr. Marcia Loeb slices into the insect under her microscope and extracts a pea-sized organ she thinks may hold the key to saving millions of acres of trees in the United States.It is the reproductive organ of the male gypsy moth, one of the most destructive pests in the country. If she can thoroughly understand its reproductive system, she might be able to find a poison that would halt the spread of the insect and the damage it causes.As a research physiologist at the federal Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Loeb has spent 18 years cutting open the little creatures and examining their organs.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
The director of the Annapolis hospital nursery where three babies were mistakenly poisoned has resigned without explanation, Anne Arundel Medical Center confirmed yesterday.Dr. Sandra Lee Loeb, a neonatologist who was hired in January 1994 to supervise the opening of the critical care nursery, notified hospital officials Feb. 27 that her last day would be March 3, said spokeswoman Carolyn Shenk.Dr. Loeb's assistant, Teresa Blocker, a neonatal nurse practitioner, also resigned.The doctor's resignation came about a month after three newborns suffered breathing difficulties after they were given morphine accidentally.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1996
Stick to the basics: If you like to ask prospective employees trick questions or try to intimidate them, you won't find out what really matters: can this person do the job? Nicholas Corcodilos, an executive search consultant interviewed in Working Woman magazine, says a job interview should not be about a candidate's most challenging experience or greatest accomplishments. "Interviewing is about the job," he says. Better would be a hands-on session in which someone gets to show what he or she can do, Mr. Corcodilos said.
FEATURES
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1995
College students may not agree with everything Paul Rogat Loeb has to say about them, but they have to admit he's done his homework.That's more than he can say for some of you.Mr. Loeb began researching this book in the early '80s while lecturing on college campuses about citizen involvement in critical public issues. He followed this up with hundreds of student interviews from 1987 through 1993. The observations and questions that arose from those interviewed, and Mr. Loeb's passionate analysis of his subjects' responses, make up the bulk of "Generation at the Crossroads."
NEWS
December 10, 1996
Mary Leakey, 83, an archaeologist and anthropologist whose curiosity about prehistoric humans led her and her husband to momentous discoveries about man's origins, died yesterday in Nairobi, Kenya.Louis and Mary Leakey found fossils in Tanzania and Kenya that indicated man's evolution began in East Africa 2 million years ago, far earlier than was believed at the time of the discovery.Three months before her death, Mrs. Leakey agreed it was impossible for scientists to pinpoint exactly when prehistoric man became fully human.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | April 19, 2008
As he prepared to preside over his last Passover services at Beth El synagogue in Pikesville, Rabbi Mark Loeb allowed himself to consider the opportunities and the responsibilities that come with freedom - his own and the human family's. "Most people think the story is the Haggadah, where we say God gets the people out of bondage. We celebrate it, and happy days are here again. That's not it," Loeb said, referring to Passover. "Liberation from bondage only takes you away from oppression, but it doesn't liberate your soul to dream about how to live your life."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2007
Three Sun journalists who produced the revelatory series "Crab Factory," which detailed the rise of Asian crabmeat and its effect on Maryland's ailing seafood industry, won a Gerald Loeb Award for distinguished business and financial journalism last night. During a ceremony at a restaurant in New York, reporters Gady A. Epstein and Stephanie Desmon and photographer Chiaki Kawajiri won in the medium-sized newspaper category - those with circulations of 150,000 to 350,000 - for the two-part series, the first article of which ran on April 30, 2006.
NEWS
August 19, 2005
GEORGE SCHAUM, JR., formerly of Baltimore, MD, died August 13, 2005, in Virginia Beach, VA. He was born on April 28, 1922 in Huntington, WVA. The eldest of four children. He was a disabled world war II Navy veteran, worked for Gunther and National Brewing Cos. in Baltimore and retired from the brewing industry in Norfolk, VA. Cherishing his memory are his son, Jerome Benton Schaum and daughter-in-law Marilyn Chelborg Schaum of Virginia Beach, VA. He is also survived by brothers William Schaum, Sr. and Charles Schaum, their wives Helen and Maggie and brother-in-law Raymond Loeb, all of Baltimore, five nephews, four nieces and their children.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 3, 2003
On the phone, Lisa Loeb isn't very chatty. But she is polite, her words softly spoken. Since her ascent up the pop charts in '94, she has been the antithesis of what's hot: a brainy singer-songwriter in dark-frame glasses with a flippy That Girl-like do, strumming a guitar and crooning lyrics of love lost and found. Her style is never obtrusive or overdone; there's an openness. "The songs are inspired by different experiences," she says, "but they aren't too autobiographical." On Saturday night, the Dallas native will perform at Temple Oheb Shalom, 7310 Park Heights Ave., in a concert open to the community (age 10 and up)
FEATURES
By Rod Harmon and Rod Harmon,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | December 16, 2002
Lisa Loeb is such a girly-girl. She loves The Bachelor. She bakes cakes for friends. Her '60s-retro glasses and flip hairstyle give her an innocent look, like the shy classmate who was sweet to everyone and preferred reading to going to pep rallies. And she loves Hello Kitty. Her home is filled with the round-faced feline, from watches and leg warmers to purses and waffle makers. For her latest album, Hello Lisa (Artemis Records), Loeb took her innocent persona to the nth level by combining her two loves.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Consumers worried about potential layoffs and heavy debt will carefully watch their spending in coming months, shunning luxury goods and seeking out value, say retailers and industry experts gathered here for a national trade show. Talk of the recession - and how to survive it - dominated yesterday's opening of the National Retail Federation's annual conference, where retailers met in hopes of finding ways to lure shoppers after a difficult year. "The consumer has changed and downsized," said Walter Loeb, a New York-based retail analyst and president of Loeb Associates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeffrey Gettleman and Jeffrey Gettleman,Los Angeles Times | November 21, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- Ever since that night at a local bar two years ago when the idea sprang forth from the forest of Bud long necks like a message from above, Steven Loeb has been determined to make a comedy about a town full of serial killers.A week ago Saturday, he had 120 seconds to deliver his pitch."OK, there's this small logging town in Oregon with a big problem," Loeb began, a smile sneaking across his face.The movie producer sitting across from him nodded."Helen kills short people, Alton kills redheads and Matt targets loggers," Loeb explained.
NEWS
August 19, 2005
GEORGE SCHAUM, JR., formerly of Baltimore, MD, died August 13, 2005, in Virginia Beach, VA. He was born on April 28, 1922 in Huntington, WVA. The eldest of four children. He was a disabled world war II Navy veteran, worked for Gunther and National Brewing Cos. in Baltimore and retired from the brewing industry in Norfolk, VA. Cherishing his memory are his son, Jerome Benton Schaum and daughter-in-law Marilyn Chelborg Schaum of Virginia Beach, VA. He is also survived by brothers William Schaum, Sr. and Charles Schaum, their wives Helen and Maggie and brother-in-law Raymond Loeb, all of Baltimore, five nephews, four nieces and their children.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 16, 2001
As a New Yorker, the scenes from the World Trade Center so shocked and affected conductor Benjamin Loeb that he felt he had to do something. So he organized a free concert at the Peabody Institute, where he is finishing up studies for a graduate performance diploma. "The sole function of music is to elevate the human spirit," he says. "That's what I want to do with this concert." Of all the musical responses made so far locally to the events of Sept. 11, this one is perhaps the most unusual.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeffrey Gettleman and Jeffrey Gettleman,Los Angeles Times | November 21, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- Ever since that night at a local bar two years ago when the idea sprang forth from the forest of Bud long necks like a message from above, Steven Loeb has been determined to make a comedy about a town full of serial killers.A week ago Saturday, he had 120 seconds to deliver his pitch."OK, there's this small logging town in Oregon with a big problem," Loeb began, a smile sneaking across his face.The movie producer sitting across from him nodded."Helen kills short people, Alton kills redheads and Matt targets loggers," Loeb explained.
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