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SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
When six Ravens tested the NFL's tenuous labor peace early Friday, they found an open door and a sense of normalcy. But before night fell, the peace was shattered and the door closed. The league won a temporary administrative stay from the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday night, restoring the lockout at least through the weekend. The three-person appellate court will listen to arguments next week on the NFL's request to overturn the decision of a federal court in Minneapolis that the lockout was illegal.
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SPORTS
By Mike Preston | June 23, 2011
When the NFL owners' lockout was first announced, there was fear that some of the league's biggest players would get bigger, because they wouldn't have the discipline to remain fit without the various mini-camps. But the Ravens' Haloti Ngata has shrunk. The giant defensive tackle out of Oregon has lost 25 pounds, down to 325. He is faster, stronger, quicker and poised to have a third straight Pro Bowl season. And the strike has helped. "I've used the time off to spend more time with my family," said Ngata, who is living Salt Lake City.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
When the clock strikes midnight and Thursday evening officially becomes Friday morning the world of professional football, and the multi-billion dollar economy it fuels, will almost certainly come to a grinding halt. Baring a last-minute miracle at the table — something neither side believes is likely — the current collective bargaining agreement between the NFL owners and the NFL Players Association will expire. The owners are expected to begin a lockout that will stop payment on players' salaries and bar them from showing up to work.
SPORTS
By JIM HENNEMAN | January 17, 1993
Richard Ravitch has said he will advise club owners not to lock out the players this season, but those who care about such things shouldn't interpret that as a guarantee there won't be a work stoppage in baseball this year.Every indication now points to spring training opening on time, but without any written guarantees the owners will be taking a huge risk. Once the collective bargaining agreement was re-opened, an option granted to both sides when the deal was struck three years ago, it gave either side the right to take action.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
The NFL players' leadership is expected to recommend the labor deal Monday, which would move the league one step closer to ending the lockout. According to an ESPN report, the league and the players have reached an agreement on the remaining issues in a 10-year collective bargaining agreement. The report said the players are planning a major news conference Monday. Josh Wilson, though, will believe it when he sees it. There's been too many times recently when the Ravens cornerback thought the sides were close, only to deal with disappointment again.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Major League Baseball's 28 owners voted yesterday to reopen their collective bargaining agreement with the Major League Players Association, a decision that could move the sport closer to a major labor showdown.The owners voted 15-13 to resume bargaining with the players union one year before the 1990 Basic Agreement was scheduled to expire -- creating the possibility of a lockout that could endanger the 1993 season -- but ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch said that the owners have no plans to take such action.
SPORTS
By Jerome Holtzman and Jerome Holtzman,Chicago Tribune | April 3, 1991
CHICAGO -- Richie Phillips, the Philadelphia lawyer who represents the Major League Umpires Association, yesterday filed an unfair labor practices charge against the American and National leagues.Phillips said league officials are planning to lock out the umpires, beginning Opening Day, until a contract agreement is reached, and replace them from a pool of 200 amateurs."We're very, very far apart," Phillips said. "There is hope, assuming they want to get serious and work out a deal. But if they're intent on a lockout, there is no hope."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this article | August 14, 1993
KOHLER, Wis. -- The hour was late, and Richard Ravitch was tired to the bone, working on just an hour of sleep during a two-day period.But in the midst of his grogginess and his inability to get owners and representatives of the 28 major-league teams to agree to a revenue-sharing plan, Ravitch had the presence to pull a little sleight of hand early yesterday morning.Ravitch, president of the Player Relations Committee, the owners' bargaining arm with the players association, said the owners would not lock the players out of spring training in 1994, even if the sides haven't finished negotiations for a collective bargaining agreement.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Contract talks for some of the NBA's top free agents -- including Washington Bullets forward Juwan Howard -- will get under way tomorrow after the league yesterday briefly imposed a lockout, only to reverse itself later after finally reaching an agreement with the players association.Yesterday's lockout, coming after both sides initially could not reach an agreement in the dispersal of $50 million in profit sharing, forced the cancellation of talks yesterday between the Bullets and Howard that were to take place at the Chevy Chase offices of agent David Falk.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Crown Central Petroleum Corp. has reached a tentative agreement with union workers at its Pasadena, Texas, oil refinery, potentially ending a 4 1/2 -year lockout punctuated by numerous lawsuits and countersuits filed by both sides in the dispute. In a joint statement released yesterday, the union and Baltimore-based company said they have agreed to resolve all pending litigation, which stemmed in part from the company's claim that workers tried to sabotage the plant after negotiations failed in 1996.
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