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BUSINESS
March 11, 2010
The U.S. Navy has awarded a $17 million contract to Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin to provide engineering design services for the MK 41 Vertical Launching System on two classes of ships. The MK 41 Launching System has been one of the main products made at Lockheed Martin's facility in Middle River. The contract includes options that could bring its total value to $104 million over four years. The work will be performed at facilities in Maryland and California. - Baltimore Sun staff
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
When federal databases containing sensitive information on U.S. intelligence or nuclear weapons come under cyberattack, the agencies call on major companies like Lockheed Martin, Verizon and Booz Allen Hamilton - as well as a two-year-old startup in Federal Hill - to shore up defenses. Maddrix LLC is among seven companies to be the first ones accredited in a new National Security Agency vetting program. The firms use complex data analysis and digital forensics to root out invaders that are lurking or have left behind tracks during their intrusions.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin said Friday that it will furlough about 3,000 employees across the company beginning Monday and warned that more workers would likely be sent home in later weeks if the federal government's partial shutdown continues. Spokesman Gordon Johndroe said the company could not say Friday afternoon how many Maryland workers are in that group, but the furlough "affects all our business areas across the country. " Lockheed Martin employs about 7,500 people in the state.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Matthew T. Kellermann, a computer systems analyst and lifelong baseball fan, died Aug. 1 of a heart attack at his Ellicott City home. He was 53. The son of John L. "Jack" Kellermann, an American Telephone & Telegraph worker, and Ruth Bopp Kellermann, Matthew Thomas Kellermann was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in the West Hills neighborhood before moving in 1972 with his family to the Allenford neighborhood of Ellicott City. A 1979 graduate of Mount Hebron High School, where he was an outstanding varsity pitcher, he studied for two years at the Community College of Baltimore County's Catonsville campus.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
Defense contractor Lockheed Martin Corp. said Tuesday that it is laying off 37 employees at its Middle River site, part of nationwide cuts in its mission systems and sensors division. The company notified 472 U.S. employees Tuesday their jobs are being cut. Most affected employees will stay on for two weeks before leaving with severance packages, the company said. The Middle River site, which specializes in a missile launch system used on Navy ships, will employ 531 people after the cuts.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
In a cost-cutting move, a logistics division of Lockheed Martin is moving from Johnstown, Pa., to Middle River, according to a company representative. The 78-person Global Supply Chain Services team was notified of the move Thursday, said Emily Caruso, a Lockheed Martin spokeswoman. "Our goal is to make offers to all qualified employees willing to relocate," Caruso said. "We'll supplement that with local hiring. " Lockheed Martin is not renewing the lease on this division's workspace in Johnstown, a move that will save the company $1.6 million annually, she said.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
Completion of the $10 billion merger between Martin Marietta Corp. and Lockheed Corp. makes Maryland the headquarters state for the nation's largest aerospace and defense company, a $23 billion behemoth whose new name, Lockheed Martin, echoes down through the decades of aviation history. Which company came out top dog in this deal is a matter of who you are and where you are.The corporate staffs for both companies, Martin in Bethesda and Lockheed in Calabasas, Calif., both comprised about 500 employees.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Lockheed Martin, a government contractor best known for its fighter jets, formally opened a health care center in Baltimore County Wednesday, part of a bid to expand the company's role in the medical sector. While health care services still represent a small portion of Lockheed's business, company representatives said they see the opportunity to apply Lockheed's technology and security background to the rapidly increasing amount of data entering the medical field. "We've done really large information systems in other domains, like defense intelligence … and health care is, I don't want to say just another domain, but it's going through the same pains and revolutions that we've seen in our other businesses," said chief scientist Michael Hultner.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Lockheed Martin Corp. is warning state regulators that it will lay off 35 employees based at five Maryland military facilities because a contract to provide services at those locations is not being renewed. The Bethesda-based defense contractor told the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation that layoffs would affect four employees based at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, two employees based at a Naval Observatory location in Montgomery County, 14 employees based at two Naval Support Activity locations in Maryland and 15 employees based at the Naval Air Station in Patuxent River.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Divisions of Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp. won major contracts at opposite ends of the globe yesterday.Australia picked the company to help complete that nation's early warning radar system. And the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office awarded Lockheed Martin $254 million for upgrading computer operations.The Australian project involves a joint venture with Transfield Defence Systems to manage the installation of two radar complexes, the Jindalee Operational Radar Network, which will guard Australia's northern coast.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Denise Charrier McQuighan, a database engineer and Johns Hopkins University graduate, died of cancer March 5 at her Gaithersburg home. She was 55. Born Denise Anne Charrier in Cincinnati, she was the daughter of George Charrier, an engineer who lives in Cody, Wyo., and Jacqueline Watson Charrier, a Hunt Valley resident. Mrs. McQuighan was a 1976 graduate of Cincinnati's Western Hills High School and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lockheed Martin Corp. announced Tuesday that it signed a contract to develop the world's largest wave energy project off Victoria, Australia, calling it a "significant step toward making ocean energy commercially available. " The New Ventures office of Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training Baltimore site signed the deal with Victorian Wave Partners Ltd. to develop a 62.5-megawatt peak power wave energy generation project. The project will use a wave energy converter buoy pioneered by Ocean Power Technologies of Pennington, N.J. As the buoy moves up and down on waves, the mechanical energy drives an electrical generator, which is sent to shore through underwater cables.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Aerospace firm Sigma Space Corp. has joined fellow Maryland companies Under Armour and Lockheed Martin in developing technology to help the U.S. Speedskating team at the Winter Olympics. Lanham-based Sigma Space said Friday its optical and mechanical engineers have been at work on a secret project since the fall to enhance skaters performance. Through its "Blade Runner" mission, the company aimed to build a tool that could polish skate blade sides, which never go through the sharpening common to blade bottoms.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
When they race this month at the Olympics, U.S. speedskaters will suit up in skin-tight, high-tech uniforms that research shows could make a measurable difference in their speed. In a quest to create the world's fastest suit for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, two iconic Maryland companies, Under Armour and Lockheed Martin, created a unique collaboration. Already a supplier for the team, Baltimore's hometown sports apparel brand turned to the Bethesda-based defense and aerospace giant to help it fashion the most aerodynamic suit possible, using computer modeling based on filming the athletes and hundreds of hours of wind tunnel testing.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay leaders is losing the organization more money -- this time from Maryland. This week, Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, one of the largest private employers in the state, announced it will no longer provide philanthropic support to the Boy Scouts because of the nonprofit organization's "policies that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and religious affiliation. " Lockheed Martin announced its decision in a statement to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Lockheed Martin, a government contractor best known for its fighter jets, formally opened a health care center in Baltimore County Wednesday, part of a bid to expand the company's role in the medical sector. While health care services still represent a small portion of Lockheed's business, company representatives said they see the opportunity to apply Lockheed's technology and security background to the rapidly increasing amount of data entering the medical field. "We've done really large information systems in other domains, like defense intelligence … and health care is, I don't want to say just another domain, but it's going through the same pains and revolutions that we've seen in our other businesses," said chief scientist Michael Hultner.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1996
They make missiles, warplanes and space vehicles, but no longer does Lockheed Martin Corp. supply a healthy percentage of the rocks and minerals used across the country in more Earth-bound construction work.The Bethesda defense giant announced yesterday that it had completed a stock swap that purged it of Martin Marietta Materials Inc., of Raleigh, N.C."Obviously, their core business is defense, and they decided to spin off this business to shareholders," said industry analyst Stuart McCutchan, who publishes a newsletter called Defense Mergers & Acquisitions.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin said Friday that it will furlough about 3,000 employees across the company beginning Monday and warned that more workers would likely be sent home in later weeks if the federal government's partial shutdown continues. Spokesman Gordon Johndroe said the company could not say Friday afternoon how many Maryland workers are in that group, but the furlough "affects all our business areas across the country. " Lockheed Martin employs about 7,500 people in the state.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's federal political action committee accepted more than $73,000 in contributions during this year's General Assembly session — donations that would have been unlawful if they had been directed to a state campaign. Because the money was sent to a campaign account set up under federal law, the governor's O' Say Can You See PAC could accept the money. Nevertheless, the public might wonder whether the federal account was intended as a "runaround on the prohibition on raising funds during the session," said Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, Maryland executive director of the watchdog group Common Cause.
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