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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
ARLINGTON, Va. -- George H. Williams of Joppa movedthrough the crowd to the front row where the president was inching along, shaking hands, looking into one face of grief after another. Mr. Williams waited, then told his story again, this time to the president of the United States."My son was in the Army," began Mr. Williams, shaking Mr. Clinton's hand. The president clenched his jaw, nodded his head and listened to Mr. Williams, whose son, an Army first lieutenant, was one of 270 people killed when a terrorist bomb exploded aboard Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland five years ago yesterday.
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NEWS
By Daniel Morris | September 1, 2009
In my graduate class on Arab politics, we would often puzzle over decisions autocratic leaders have made that did not seem to make sense, either in moral or strategic terms. It was often tempting to take the intellectually lazy route and think they were simply crazy or stupid. In order to make the discussion more productive, the professor would suggest that we assume the leaders are at least as smart as ourselves. In recent weeks, the only person convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing was released to Libyan soil, where he received a jubilant welcome organized by Libyan leader Col. Muammar el Kadafi.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1990
LONDON -- Jetliners should be made more bomb-resistant to lessen the destructive power of explosions like the one that ripped apart Pan Am Flight 103 over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in December 1988, according to an official report into the disaster yesterday.Investigators from the British Department of Transport's Air Accidents Investigation Branch called on airplane manufacturers and authorities on airworthiness to work out "measures that might mitigate the effects of explosive devices and improve the tolerance of aircraft structure and systems to explosive damage."
NEWS
August 23, 2009
Should Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, the terminally ill man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 270 people in 1988, have been released from prison to die in Libya? Yes 6% No 92% Not sure 2% (1,087 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Do you think the federal Car Allowance Rebate System, or "Cash for Clunkers", was a successful economic stimulus program? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Ray Takeyh | February 5, 2001
WASHINGTON -- More than 12 years after Pan Am 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, the striking point about the most expensive and elaborate trial in British legal history is its complete irrelevance, despite the conviction of a Libyan intelligence agent. Libya had negotiated such advantageous legal procedures that, regardless of the verdict, the government and its high-ranking officials would be insulated from any responsibility. The initial U.S. position was that the culprits of the bombing were not limited to two minor functionaries and that the case would have to be pursued to its logical conclusion.
NEWS
February 2, 2001
CHURCH BELLS did not toll in Lockerbie, Scotland, after the conviction of a Libyan intelligence officer for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over that town in December 1988, killing 259 passengers and crew and 11 townsfolk. The unanimous verdict of three Scottish judges, under Scottish law, sitting in a bit of the Netherlands proclaimed to be Scotland, brought no closure. The conviction of one of two defendants implicates the Libyan regime of Col. Muammar el Kadafi in the eyes of victims' kin, the U.S. and British governments, but not in Libya's.
NEWS
By Michael Wines XTC and Michael Wines XTC,New York Times News Service | October 10, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Newly uncovered evidence in the terrorist bombing of a Pan American jumbo jet in December 1988 indicates for the first time that Libyan intelligence agents may have assembled and planted the bomb that destroyed the plane, U.S. government investigators involved in the inquiry said this week.Until now the 2-year-old inquiry into the bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, has focused on evidence that Iran hired a Syrian-sponsored terrorist group, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, to bomb a U.S. airliner in late 1988.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 21, 1993
Less than 48 hours after he got the news, Joe Horgan was flying toward a little farming village in Scotland.Christmas lights twinkled back home in North Wales, Pa.Ahead, the sun was rising on the still-smoldering wreck of a U.S. jumbo jet and 270 twisted bodies.Somewhere among them was his brother-in-law, Mike Doyle of Voorhees, Pa.On Dec. 21, 1988, Pan American Flight 103 had been en route to New York from Frankfurt, Germany, when a bomb exploded in its baggage compartment.Seconds later, and 31,000 feet below, the people of Lockerbie, Scotland, saw a V-shaped fireball tumbling out of the sky, then a "rain of fire" as wings and bodies and engines fell onto the houses and fields, killing 11 villagers in addition to the 259 people on board.
NEWS
August 23, 2009
Should Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, the terminally ill man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 270 people in 1988, have been released from prison to die in Libya? Yes 6% No 92% Not sure 2% (1,087 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Do you think the federal Car Allowance Rebate System, or "Cash for Clunkers", was a successful economic stimulus program? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
An oddly graceful flying boat called the China Clipper rose out of a cove off Middle River in late October 1935 and flew straight into aviation history. Not quite a month later, the Pan American China Clipper, by the Glenn L. Martin company, flew from San Francisco on the first transoceanic flight by a commercial airliner. The Clipper hopped island to island across the Pacific Ocean to Manila in about five days. "Ron Davis, the curator for air transport at the Air and Space Museum, said that was the greatest event in transport history," says George Price, a Pan Am pilot for 31 years.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
The cool and quiet of Rosemary and Larry Mild's Severna Park home was broken again by the ringing phone. Reporters were calling to probe their reaction Thursday to news that the Libyan intelligence officer convicted of planting a bomb on Pan Am Flight 103 - the bomb that killed Rosemary's daughter over Lockerbie, Scotland - had been released from prison. Scottish authorities allowed Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, who has terminal cancer, to return to Libya and his wife and five children. "You ask how I am?"
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 29, 2007
LONDON -- Nearly 19 years after a bomb blew up Pan Am Flight 103 in the skies above Lockerbie, Scotland, and six years after a former Libyan intelligence agent was convicted of planning the attack, a judicial review has resurrected lingering doubts about the case. The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, an independent panel that oversees matters brought before Scottish courts, recommended yesterday that Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, the only person convicted in the case, be granted permission to file a fresh appeal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - The White House said yesterday that President Bush had removed U.S. restrictions on travel to Libya and would allow for a significant expansion of diplomatic dialogue with the country. Officials said the action is warranted now that Libya has dismantled most of its nuclear infrastructure and reaffirmed its responsibility for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. "While more remains to be done, Libya's actions have been serious, credible and consistent with Colonel Kadafi's public declaration that Libya seeks to play a role in building a new world free from [weapons of mass destruction]
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
An oddly graceful flying boat called the China Clipper rose out of a cove off Middle River in late October 1935 and flew straight into aviation history. Not quite a month later, the Pan American China Clipper, by the Glenn L. Martin company, flew from San Francisco on the first transoceanic flight by a commercial airliner. The Clipper hopped island to island across the Pacific Ocean to Manila in about five days. "Ron Davis, the curator for air transport at the Air and Space Museum, said that was the greatest event in transport history," says George Price, a Pan Am pilot for 31 years.
NEWS
By Ray Takeyh | February 5, 2001
WASHINGTON -- More than 12 years after Pan Am 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, the striking point about the most expensive and elaborate trial in British legal history is its complete irrelevance, despite the conviction of a Libyan intelligence agent. Libya had negotiated such advantageous legal procedures that, regardless of the verdict, the government and its high-ranking officials would be insulated from any responsibility. The initial U.S. position was that the culprits of the bombing were not limited to two minor functionaries and that the case would have to be pursued to its logical conclusion.
NEWS
February 2, 2001
CHURCH BELLS did not toll in Lockerbie, Scotland, after the conviction of a Libyan intelligence officer for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over that town in December 1988, killing 259 passengers and crew and 11 townsfolk. The unanimous verdict of three Scottish judges, under Scottish law, sitting in a bit of the Netherlands proclaimed to be Scotland, brought no closure. The conviction of one of two defendants implicates the Libyan regime of Col. Muammar el Kadafi in the eyes of victims' kin, the U.S. and British governments, but not in Libya's.
TOPIC
By Milton Viorst | April 11, 1999
COL. MUAMMAR El Kadafi's emissary, Youssef Debri, met me in Cairo last year. He was in Egypt exploring the ramifications of Libya's surrendering two of its citizens to stand trial for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.In formal talks in New York, a U.N. official had managed to narrow the gap between Libya's concerns and the British-American proposal for a trial in the Netherlands, but important differences remained.Now Debri was in Cairo informally, to clarify Washington's terms with a well-connected, retired American diplomat, in the hope of ending Kadafi's equivocation.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - Facing a Friday deadline, the State Department is poised to renew U.S.-Libyan travel restrictions for only several months instead of the full year allowed under law, angering relatives of those killed in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and amounting to what some see as a new step in warming U.S. relations with Libyan Col. Muammar el Kadafi. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright is strongly considering a measure that would extend the travel restrictions on Americans in Libya for another three or six months, according to congressional aides and families of bombing victims who have been briefed by the department.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
The Scottish court that delivered its verdict yesterday in the Lockerbie bombing trial found one Libyan defendant guilty and another innocent in the deaths of 270 people. It also declared that "conception, planning and execution" of the plot that led to the destruction of Pan Am Flight 103 on Dec. 22, 1988, "was of Libyan origin." But not every question was answered: Still unknown is how a bomb got aboard the Pan Am plane, as well as many of the actions of the two defendants. The defendants were Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, found guilty of murder, and Al Amin Khalifa Fhimah, found innocent.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 2001
CAMP ZEIST, Netherlands - In a split verdict that stunned defendants and relatives, a Libyan intelligence agent was found guilty and sentenced to life in prison for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. His Libyan co-defendant was set free. Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, 48, was ordered by a panel of three judges to serve a minimum of 20 years in a Scottish prison. Al-Megrahi, who maintains that he is innocent in the bombing that killed 259 passengers and 11 others on the ground, has two weeks to file an appeal.
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