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NEWS
October 7, 1990
The following are the rules regarding locker-room access for male and female reporters for various sporting events:Major League Baseball: Clubhouses generally are open to male and female reporters, except for closing about 90 minutes before games. They reopen immediately after the game. The Baltimore Orioles allow reporters in their clubhouse until about 45 minutes before the first pitch.National Football League: Open to male and female reporters after games and for a short time on practice days.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 22, 2014
Washington Redskins cornerback DeAngelo Hall said Sunday that the team's medical staff believes he tore his left Achilles tendon early in the second quarter of the team's 37-34 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles. The 11th-year veteran suffered the injury on a play that occurred away from the ball. He said he believed his foot was stepped on as he ran. Immediately after the play, Hall lay, writhing in pain, near the right side of the field, the opposite side of the field from where Eagles running back Darren Sproles had been tackled.
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SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
I love it when some player reportedly "calls me" out. Apparently, that's what former Ravens safety Ed Reed did last week. He called me out during a conference call with the Baltimore media last week. I actually listened to the recording before it got on local radio and heard Reed laughing before he made any comments. In all honesty, I thought the comments were made more out of respect than ridicule. Reed and I had a good relationship when he was younger with the Ravens, and it did get a little tense the last few years he was in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Saturday's 31-20 victory over visiting North Carolina Central lifted Towson to a 2-2 record, marking their first time at .500 since the beginning of the season. The win also injected some much-needed confidence into the team, coach Rob Ambrose said Monday during his weekly conference call arranged by the Colonial Athletic Association. “These are college students with college-student problems and injuries,” he said. “Everybody's got problems. So it's about managing them as best we can and moving forward.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
It's no surprise that Terps football coach Randy Edsall sleeps in his office during training camp. Actually, he sleeps in a private area of the locker room. He's been a coach for more than 30 years and this is standard training camp practice. “It's all I know,” he said. Edsall lives about a 30-minute drive from campus, so he said bunking in College Park is a time-saver and helps build morale. We wrote previously on how a couple of the assistant coaches were sleeping in the dorms.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Saturday's 31-20 victory over visiting North Carolina Central lifted Towson to a 2-2 record, marking their first time at .500 since the beginning of the season. The win also injected some much-needed confidence into the team, coach Rob Ambrose said Monday during his weekly conference call arranged by the Colonial Athletic Association. “These are college students with college-student problems and injuries,” he said. “Everybody's got problems. So it's about managing them as best we can and moving forward.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
Police officials have interviewed a suspect in the wake of three thefts since November from a locker room at Westminster High.Investigators said Wednesday night that they were going to question a former student in connection with the three incidents, but officials said no charges had been filed as of yesterday afternoon.The latest incident was Tuesday night, when members of the Frederick High School boys basketball team told state police that valuables were stolen from clothing that was left in the locker room during a game.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 30, 1990
Let's go back to the scene of the crime: the New England Patriots locker room. Like all NFL locker rooms, it is where the players undress, shower, dress, gossip, play cards, stretch, read the paper, exchange head butts, meet with the coach, emit the occasional primal scream and also where they can be interviewed by sportswriters and their electronic-media brethren. The place smells of salve and sweat and laundry baskets overflowing with jockstraps. You get used to the atmosphere, but no one would ever confuse a locker room with, say, the Tulerie Gardens.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 5, 1990
ALMOST EVERY SOCIAL issue gets played out on or around the sports pages. You want to talk about drugs? You want to talk about greed? You want to talk about race relations? You want to talk about men and women?Tune in to your local sports station and argue about drug testing on the football field, the undeserving rich on the mound, race relations in the front office, segregation at the golf course. And sexual harassment in the locker room.The story of Lisa Olson, the Boston Herald reporter whose treatment by a gang of Patriots gave new meaning to the term ''locker-room mentality,'' began when a group of naked football players reportedly displayed their parts before her. They suggested that she wanted to reach out and touch someone.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | November 30, 1990
THE GUILTY verdict is in and the big fines have been imposed, but countless Americans still believe that a woman reporter's place is not in the locker room of a professional football team.When this furor first erupted, I received mounds of letters from men and women. The majority of them said that female sports reporters aren't really looking for news stories; they are shameless hussies who want to enter locker rooms to gaze upon the players' sex organs.At first, I disagreed, saying that the players could easily resolve the dispute by donning robes or wrapping towels around their waists.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
We hereby call upon the editor of The Sun op-ed page to suspend Susan Reimer two weeks for violating the rules of rational thinking ( "Ray Rice decision appears to prompt new NFL policy," Aug. 17). She is worried that the NFL "seeks to punish not only behavior that affects play on the field but behavior not even found criminal under the law. " Her first example: "Bullying in the locker room, for example. " As a former sportswriter, Ms. Reimer should know that what happens in the locker room most definitely does affect play on the field, including when it leads a bullied player to quit the team.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Former Maryland basketball star Walt Williams, who currently serves as an analyst on the team's radio broadcast at home games, said Wednesday that he heard sophomore forward Charles Mitchell being "disruptive" during a timeout in Tuesday's game against Virginia Tech. The incident led to Mitchell being sent to the locker room by Terps coach Mark Turgeon . Williams said he didn't hear or see what preceeded the timeout. “I was listening to what Mark was telling them at the under 4-minute timeout, and I could hear Charles talking too. You could hear both of them.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
TAMPA -- For the first time in his major league career, Brian Roberts faced the Orioles as an opponent on Tuesday night  Roberts, who spent 15 years in an Orioles uniform and was the face of the franchise for several of them, played his first game against his former team as a member of the New York Yankees. The 36-year-old Roberts signed a one-year, $2-million deal with the Yankees in the offseason. In the Orioles' exhibition game against the Yankees, Roberts started at second base and batting cleanup.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith took to his new blog Wednesday to show support for University of Missouri defensive end Michael Sam, who came out publicly Sunday night . "I would personally like to applaud Michael Sam for being the first in this profession to be open and honest about his sexuality," Smith wrote. "This shows his courage and strength. " Sam, whose announcement of his sexual orientation first appeared in The New York Times and ESPN, is poised to become the NFL's first openly gay player if he's selected in May's NFL draft.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
When Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith reported to his first training camp two years ago, he anticipated being hazed by veteran teammates. He had heard the stories and watched shows like HBO's "Hard Knocks" that glorified the behavior and was prepared to be rudely welcomed to the NFL. But to his surprise, the rookies were welcomed by leaders like Ray Lewis, Ed Reed and Terrell Suggs, who made it clear that the team had more important things to...
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
I love it when some player reportedly "calls me" out. Apparently, that's what former Ravens safety Ed Reed did last week. He called me out during a conference call with the Baltimore media last week. I actually listened to the recording before it got on local radio and heard Reed laughing before he made any comments. In all honesty, I thought the comments were made more out of respect than ridicule. Reed and I had a good relationship when he was younger with the Ravens, and it did get a little tense the last few years he was in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Susan Reimer is a sportswriter for The Sun | October 7, 1990
We are all part of a larger landscape -- even we humble women sportswriters -- and so it is that the controversy over our access to locker rooms has less to do, perhaps, with the First Amendment than it does with the evolving role of women in society.I don't know. Maybe it doesn't. Maybe the controversy surrounding Lisa Olson and the New England Patriots means that some men are just plain animals and some are just plain bigots and that when they take their clothes off it is just plain hard to tell the difference.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
A security system thwarted intruders as they drilled peepholes to look into the locker room of a Long Reach women's gym Friday night, police said.Officers have made no arrests, but they have identified suspects and charges of breaking and entering are pending, said police spokesman Sgt. Gary L. Gardner.Police were alerted when the security system was triggered about 9:30 p.m. at the Synergy women's gym, in the 8800 block of Columbia 100 Parkway in Long Reach.Police arrived to discover the gym's front door open and holes drilled through the ceiling.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
It's no surprise that Terps football coach Randy Edsall sleeps in his office during training camp. Actually, he sleeps in a private area of the locker room. He's been a coach for more than 30 years and this is standard training camp practice. “It's all I know,” he said. Edsall lives about a 30-minute drive from campus, so he said bunking in College Park is a time-saver and helps build morale. We wrote previously on how a couple of the assistant coaches were sleeping in the dorms.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Between 1983 and 2004, Syracuse advanced to the NCAA tournament semifinals every year, a remarkable accomplishment that may never be matched again. What makes Duke's seven consecutive appearances in the Final Four nearly as impressive is that the Blue Devils have achieved that in a four-round tournament, which was expanded from 12 to 16 teams for the 2003 season. But seventh-seeded Duke (14-5), which will tangle with Cornell (14-3) in the first of two national semifinals this Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, is just 2-4 in the Final Four, advancing to the title game in 2007 (losing to Johns Hopkins)
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