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Loch Raven Village

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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Neighborhoods: The cheek-and-jowl Loch Raven Village and Knettishall Location: Mostly in Towson (Baltimore County) Average sales price: $219,000 (January through June) Notable features: Brick townhouses built in the 1940s and '50s, with more personality than most of the newer stuff. The yards are large enough for flower gardens, and Interstate 695 is less than a mile away. (Why "mostly in Towson"? Because the eastern half of Loch Raven Village is in Parkville.
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NEWS
By Mary Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 18, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance has offered his assurances that the Loch Raven Elementary School will not be demolished. Dance wrote in response to an April 30 letter from County Councilman David Marks and members of the General Assembly who represent the Towson area. "Let me assure you that we have gone on record that Loch Raven Elementary School will be a renovation/addition," he wrote. "There are no plans to demolish the building. " The 66-year-old school building hasn't welcomed elementary school students since 1982 but Dance last year proposed moving the children of Halstead Academy to a new school on the Loch Raven site.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1999
In an attempt to distinguish Loch Raven Village from what residents see as the urban sprawl of Towson, the neighborhood association has put up a series of colorful banners to give the area an identity.On light poles along busy roads, including Putty Hill Avenue, Pleasant Plains Road and Glen Keith Boulevard, hang 34 banners identifying Loch Raven Village -- an unusual, county-funded effort to make the community stand out from the surrounding areas of Towson and Parkville, which residents feel threaten to overshadow it.There's a tendency to see suburban neighborhoods "all as one great sea of homes, and yet they're not," said David Nielsen, member of the Loch Raven Association's board of directors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Jean Amos, who had been the swimming instructor at what is now Notre Dame University of Maryland and a Red Cross water safety teacher, died March 1 of complications from dementia at her Loch Raven Village home. She was 90. The daughter of a Pennsylvania Railroad conductor and a homemaker, Jean Ford was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. She was a 1942 graduate of Western High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1944 in English from the University of Maryland, College Park, she began teaching at Robert Poole Junior High School in Hampden.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 28, 2008
The Rev. Kevin Walter Brooksbank, an associate pastor at a Loch Raven Village Roman Catholic parish, died of a viral infection and kidney failure Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 35. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cockeysville, he attended Warren Elementary School and was a 1990 Dulaney High School graduate, where he played soccer and was active in dramatics. He earned a degree in computer science at Frostburg State University, where he also played soccer and was twice awarded the Gilbert Gray Memorial Award for "exceptional work ethic on the field, an outstanding attitude toward his teammates, and a determined overall desire to play to the best of his abilities and have fun while doing it."
BUSINESS
By Rosalia Scalia and Rosalia Scalia,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 17, 1995
With its Colonial, brick Georgian townhouses and wide, tree-lined streets, Loch Raven Village, a horseshoe-shaped community just north of the city line, east of Towson and west of Parkville, is a neighborhood with a storybook feel.At night, white candles cast their lights from many front windows, giving the neighborhood a Norman Rockwell glow."They are not Christmas decorations," said Wayne Skinner, a four-year resident and board member of the Loch Raven Village Community Association. "The candles are pretty, and people like to keep them up all year long."
NEWS
October 18, 2013
I would like to thank the readers who pointed out that the former Loch Raven Elementary School is indeed used by a variety of groups and services. It affirms that the building has remained an integral part of Loch Raven Village all these years. We have been dealing with the county trying to demolish LRES since it was closed as a school in 1983. We are dumbfounded as to why Loch Raven Elementary has had a target on it all this time. Before LRES was closed, we had two schools in Loch Raven Village, Pleasant Plains and Loch Raven Elementary, and they served our community quite well.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Neighborhoods:: The cheek-and-jowl Loch Raven Village and Knettishall Location:: Mostly in Towson (Baltimore County) Average sales price: : $219,000 (January through June) Notable features: : Brick townhouses built in the 1940s and '50s, with more personality than most of the newer stuff. The yards are large enough for flower gardens, and Interstate 695 is less than a mile away. (Why "mostly in Towson"? Because the eastern half of Loch Raven Village is in Parkville.) You've got all the locational benefits of Towson here - malls, colleges, recreation - without the usual Towson price.
NEWS
August 19, 1992
Mollie C. Kirk, several of whose survivors live in Maryland, died Sunday of heart failure at her home farm in Independence, Va., at age 102.Services are set for 3 p.m. today at Gold Hill Baptist Church in that southwestern Virginia community.One of Mrs. Kirk's five surviving children, two of her 12 grandchildren and one of her five great-grandchildren live in Maryland.Born in 1890 in Bridle Creek, Va., the former Mollie C. Phipps attended schools there. She was married in 1917 to C. Mastin Kirk, who died in 1972.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
The Rev. Joseph L. McManus, the retired pastor of a Loch Raven Village Roman Catholic church and a Towson University chaplain, died of heart disease Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 76. Born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, he attended the Shrine of the Sacred Heart Parochial School and was a 1948 Loyola High School graduate. Father McManus, who attended Loyola College and received his religious education at St. Mary's Seminary, was ordained in 1956. He became an associate pastor at Immaculate Conception Church in Towson and remained there until 1977, when he was named chaplain at the Towson University Newman House.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 25, 2014
In the face of education and community issues that stretch across traditional neighborhood lines, leaders in the Loch Raven area have joined forces to resurrect the dormant Loch Raven Community Council. "It's been defunct for a number of years," Councilman David Marks, who represents the area, said. "I wanted to bring it back because I think there's a real value in having the community organizations talking to one another. I also think there are some common issues that need to be addressed.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 21, 2014
Representatives from the Loch Raven Village and the Knettishall communities emerged from a meeting Friday with Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance as strident as ever in their opposition to a plan calling for reopening a school at the site of the former Loch Raven Elementary despite assurances that a revised plan addresses some of their concerns. "We heard their feedback and aside from just not doing the school, which would be their ultimate goal, we adjusted our thinking of what it should look like based on what they said to us," Dance said in an interview after the meeting.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
A community group in the Loch Raven area got a first look Monday night at plans for Loch Raven Commons, a $45 million mixed-use development with up to 200 high-end apartments, commercial space and a village green proposed for the former Raytheon site on East Joppa Road. The meeting, which was held in Councilman David Marks' office, included the project's developer, the Buccini/Pollin Group, and an advisory committee comprising residents of nearby Towson Estates and Loch Raven Village that Marks formed earlier this year.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
I would like to thank the readers who pointed out that the former Loch Raven Elementary School is indeed used by a variety of groups and services. It affirms that the building has remained an integral part of Loch Raven Village all these years. We have been dealing with the county trying to demolish LRES since it was closed as a school in 1983. We are dumbfounded as to why Loch Raven Elementary has had a target on it all this time. Before LRES was closed, we had two schools in Loch Raven Village, Pleasant Plains and Loch Raven Elementary, and they served our community quite well.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
J. George Kropp, an educator whose career at Calvert Hall College High School teaching social studies and history spanned more than 50 years, died Sunday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Loch Raven Village resident was 76. "I call him a legend and an icon. If you knew him, he was always student-centered. He always put the kids first," said Chuck Stembler, principal of Calvert Hall. "He also had a genuine love of his subject and all things history, and he loved the intellectual rigors of history.
NEWS
Svanessen2@hotmail.com | August 28, 2013
An exciting science curriculum has been planned for students of both Halstead Academy and Pleasant Plains Elementary School for the 2013 -2014 school year. The STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)and Education Outreach Facility of Aberdeen Proving Grounds has partnered with the two schools to provide students hands-on learning opportunities. Susie Peeling, resource teacher for the schools said, "This center, which has attracted students from across the country, changes the way children think of and regard science and engineering.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1997
A proposal by a Sheppard Pratt subsidiary to open two homes for the mentally ill in Loch Raven Village near Towson has created an uproar in the 50-year-old townhouse community of almost 1,500 homes.Residents are bombarding elected officials with letters and faxes of protest. Towson Republican Councilman Douglas B. Riley, who supports his constituents' opposition, calls the furor one of the hottest issues in his seven-year tenure."It's a very emotional issue," said Lily Raines, who lives near the site of one of the proposed homes in the 8100 block of Clydebank Road.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Tryko Partners LLC, a Brick, N.J.-based private equity real estate group, said Tuesday it purchased the 253-unit Park Raven apartments in Baltimore from Continental Realty Corp. The purchase price was not immediately available. With the acquisition, Tryko owns and operates 1,137 apartment units within a three-mile radius. Park Raven, with 55 brick buildings on nearly 20 acres on Ramblewood Road, was built in 1949 and is about 95 percent occupied. The property, near Good Samaritan Hospital and two miles from Belvedere Square, underwent a major renovation in 2006, including updated kitchens and baths.
NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | July 1, 2013
Leslie Vallade is a woman on a mission. As president of the new nonprofit Loch Raven Fireworks Foundation Inc., she said only a third of the $10,000 needed to stage the annual July 4 fireworks display at Loch Raven Technical Academy has been raised. But Vallade is undaunted in her efforts and confident that spectators from the dozens of nearby neighborhoods who attend the display will come through by donating the remaining $6,500 to cover its costs. It's "been very stressful.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | August 14, 2012
With its rolling lawns and stately trees, the grounds of Babcock Presbyterian Church, just off busy Loch Raven Boulevard, is like an urban oasis. On a sweltering early August morning, a cool breeze sweeps across a grassy knoll behind the church building. The open space along Loch Ness Road is contoured with a dozen small, rectangular garden plots where squash, cucumbers, tomatoes and cantaloupes ripen on the vine and an occasional rabbit darts across the lawn and into the trees. The little plots, most about the size of a large dining room table, are part of the community garden project that Babcock Church started last year.
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