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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | June 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Some Baltimore-area federal employees could receive higher locality pay raises under a recommendation to include Baltimore and Washington in the same statistical pay area.The Federal Salary Council, an independent advisory group of union representatives and academics, recommended last week that one locality pay scale be used throughout the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Statistical Area, plus St. Mary's County, which is not part of the MSA.Locality pay is designed to bring government salaries in line with the private sector.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | June 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Federal worker legislation approved last week by the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee does not include locality pay raises.But the raises, based on regional cost-of-living differences, still have a good chance of going into effect next year.Locality pay is "definitely a priority and it's something we're looking to handle down the road," says a spokesman for Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, committee chairman. "Just because we didn't deal with it [last week], that doesn't mean it's not a priority."
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | February 3, 2006
President Bush's 2007 budget proposal next week is likely to revive the annual tug of war with Congress over whether civilians are entitled to the same pay raises as soldiers. A key union leader said that civilian workers "should not be surprised" if Bush proposes a 1.7 percent across-the-board raise for them, which, if enacted, would be the second-lowest since 1958, according to the 2005 Federal Employees Almanac. (In 1994, there was no national raise.) A three-member group of high-level government appointees recommended that raise to the president in December.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | December 2, 2005
President Bush has approved a 3.1 percent pay raise for federal workers to take effect next year, but the raises will not be paid until the president signs an executive order dividing the pot among across-the-board raises and regional adjustments, called "locality pay." Passed in 1990, locality pay helps the federal government provide wages closer to private-sector salaries in high cost-of-living cities, such as San Francisco and New York. For instance, last year, in addition to a 2.7 percent across-the-board raise, federal workers in New York received a 2.16 percent increase in locality pay -- compared with 1.72 percent in Baltimore and its surrounding counties.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | December 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In timing certain to brighten the holiday shopping season, the White House decided yesterday to let a long-awaited 4.23 percent raise for most of Maryland's 271,000 federal workers go into effect in January.The Clinton administration had a deadline of midnight to propose nTC changes in the so-called locality pay raises, which will begin making federal salaries more competitive with private-sector pay in different regions of the country.Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland said he was told by White House officials yesterday that the Clinton administration will propose no change in the plan.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | August 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's 300,000 federal workers could see an extra $700 in their paychecks next year -- a windfall from an unusual coalition of congressional Democrats and Republicans and the strange rules of the U.S. Senate.The potential increase comes after members of the conference committee crafting a compromise on the president's economic plan agreed to put the government's new "locality pay" plan into effect on Jan. 1, 1994, instead of waiting until July 1, 1994.The locality pay is designed to close the gap in earnings between public and private sector jobs in different regions of the country.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A 4.2 percent pay raise for thousands of federal workers in Central Maryland seems all but certain after President Clinton signed a government appropriations bill yesterday that would bring government salaries closer to those in the private sector.The 4.2 percent boost would be the region's first "locality pay" and would take effect in January.The Federal Salary Council, a labor-management group set up to figure out how far apart federal and private-sector salaries were in 28 different regions nationwide, recommended the 4.2 percent pay raise for white-collar federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | May 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A House committee voted yesterday to revive "locality" pay for federal workers, which the Clintonadministration wanted to postpone until 1995, and agreed to preserve federal workers' survivors' benefits despite a Clinton proposal to cut them by 10 percent.The House Post Office and Civil Service Committee restored the locality pay, designed to close the gap between federal and private-sector pay, by slashing the federal work force by 150,000 over five years instead of 100,000, eliminating cash performance awards for federal workers for four years and limiting the amount of annual leave carried over by senior executives after this year.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | May 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The average paycheck for workers in Baltimore-area federal offices would rise 3 percent next year under a bill approved yesterday by the House Appropriations Committee.The proposed raise for the 1995 fiscal year -- equaling at least $1,130 for the average federal worker in the Baltimore area -- exceeds what President Clinton proposed in his budget but is less than what federal workers say they are entitled to under a 1990 federal law. And it falls below the raises that Congress granted federal workers for this fiscal year, which equaled 4.23 percent for Baltimore-area workers.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
Federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area will get an extra 1.52 percent pay increase next year on top of the average raise approved for all government employees, thanks to an executive order signed by President Bush yesterday. Before leaving for his Christmas celebration at Camp David, Bush left a gift for workers across the country. Congress had approved the pay raise, but so-called "locality pay" is added for employees in many cities where the cost of living is more expensive, to bring their wages closer to those earned in the private sector.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | December 2, 2005
President Bush has approved a 3.1 percent pay raise for federal workers to take effect next year, but the raises will not be paid until the president signs an executive order dividing the pot among across-the-board raises and regional adjustments, called "locality pay." Passed in 1990, locality pay helps the federal government provide wages closer to private-sector salaries in high cost-of-living cities, such as San Francisco and New York. For instance, last year, in addition to a 2.7 percent across-the-board raise, federal workers in New York received a 2.16 percent increase in locality pay -- compared with 1.72 percent in Baltimore and its surrounding counties.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
In January, when Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. became the sole distributor of its signature product - a dime-sized wafer that dispenses anti-cancer treatments - the Baltimore company needed to beef up its sales-and-marketing team to go after new customers. The strategy is working, but it comes at a price. The company said yesterday that it more than doubled its spending on selling, general and administrative expenses in the first quarter. That, coupled with an increase in research and development costs, helped push the drug developer to a loss of $14.6 million, or 55 cents per share, in the three months that ended March 31. That compares with an operating loss of $8.3 million in last year's first quarter, excluding an $8.6 million one-time accounting charge.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2000
Frederick Douglass' work as an abolitionist, activist, orator and author took him all over the world, but the years he spent in Baltimore as a child were among the most important: That is when he learned to read. Douglass' struggle to learn to read while enduring the conditions of slavery is depicted in a mural in east Baltimore that local artist Gary Mullen hopes will enlighten residents and improve the neighborhood that requested it. "Frederick Douglass had a hard time; he didn't have the right to read," Mullen said of the abolitionist who began his life as a slave on Maryland's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
Robert J. Antonetti is still expected to be Howard County's new election board administrator, but he'll earn at least $13,000 a year less than first announced, according to county and state officials. The controversial, 64-year-old Prince George's County elections official is due to begin his new job in Howard County in two weeks, regardless of pay, said Antonetti's wife, Casey, and the Rev. Roland L. Howard, chairman of the Howard board. Antonetti was traveling yesterday and not available for comment.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | August 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Responding to pressure from Capitol Hill, President Clinton is likely to soon recommend a 2 percent pay increase for federal workers in Maryland and across the nation next year, modifying the administration's earlier request for a smaller raise.In addition to that salary boost, most of Maryland's federal employees are likely to receive an additional 1.1 percent salary -- increase from "locality pay," the federal government's system for bridging the earnings gap between private- and public-sector workers in different parts of the country.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | January 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- As federal workers are seeing locality pay increases in their paychecks, Maryland Rep. Steny H. Hoyer is taking steps to make sure next year's scheduled increase appears in the budget.Mr. Hoyer fired off a letter last week to Office of Management and Budget Director Leon Panetta, stating his fears that "efforts may be made to derail locality pay before it can close the gap between federal workers and their private sector counterparts."The 5th District Democrat noted resistance to future locality pay raises hinted at in a report issued last year by the President's Pay Agent, which is actually a panel of federal officials who decide how much to raise salaries in 28 metropolitan areas.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
Federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area will get an extra 1.52 percent pay increase next year on top of the average raise approved for all government employees, thanks to an executive order signed by President Bush yesterday. Before leaving for his Christmas celebration at Camp David, Bush left a gift for workers across the country. Congress had approved the pay raise, but so-called "locality pay" is added for employees in many cities where the cost of living is more expensive, to bring their wages closer to those earned in the private sector.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal workers' pay raises could be hundreds of dollars smaller next year if congressional negotiators agree to a lower salary increase approved by the Senate this week.Congressional conferees will meet as early as next week to merge two competing pay raise proposals.The House plan, strongly backed by federal worker unions, could result in a salary increase of more than 3 percent for Baltimore-area workers. The Senate plan, approved Wednesday, proposes a raise half that size.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal workers' pay raises could be hundreds of dollars smaller next year if congressional negotiators agree to a lower salary increase approved by the Senate this week.Congressional conferees will meet as early as next week to merge two competing pay raise proposals.The House plan, strongly backed by federal worker unions, could result in a salary increase of more than 3 percent for Baltimore-area workers. The Senate plan, approved Wednesday, proposes a raise half that size.
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