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By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
The board of the United Way of Central Maryland was meeting today to decide whether it should withhold dues to its national trade group, the United Way of America, which has been hit by allegations of financial abuses.The local board already has withheld payment of about $80,000 in first-quarter dues to the national organization. Today's meeting was the first time the local board has met to discuss how to respond to the allegations and stem distrust of the organization.Withholding dues "is a tough call for the board of directors to make," said Mel Tansill, spokesman for the local group, which paid $346,000 to the national organization last year.
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NEWS
By Lisa Silverman and Lisa Silverman,Sun reporter | April 16, 2008
"Students already have voices," said Andrew Gavelek, student member of the Howard County Board of Education. "It's just a matter of using them." About 160 students from 29 middle and high schools had their voices heard last week at the second Youth Summit at The Gathering Place in Clarksville. The summit was sponsored by Voices for Change, an organization of young people and adults that empowers students to create positive change in Howard County, according to its mission statement. Brianna Bradford, a junior at Reservoir High School, has served as the student co-chair of Voices for Change, formerly known as the Youth Summit Planning Committee, for the past two years.
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
In an attempt to head off a drop in donations, the board of United Way of Central Maryland has decided to change the way it pays dues to its national trade group, United Way of America, which has been hit by allegations of financial abuses.The board, meeting in Baltimore yesterday, decided to pay the dues monthly rather than quarterly, said Norman O. Taylor, president of the local group.It also will monitor the management of the national organization more closely, a process that will include periodic reviews of financial reports, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
General Motors Corp.'s proposed labor contract appears to offer good news for its White Marsh transmission plant. The deal calls for production through at least 2012 at the three plants the facility supplies with transmissions, the United Auto Workers said yesterday. The plants are in Flint and Pontiac, Mich., and Arlington, Texas. "It's going to directly affect us on a positive side -- we're going to have longevity just like they do," said Fred Swanner, president of UAW Local 239, which represents nearly 370 White Marsh workers.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | March 20, 1995
Mention the term United Way to people nowadays, and you will probably get the most polarized reaction that the pairing of any two words could elicit.People seem to be divided into two camps: staunch supporters and die-hard critics. Lost in the argument lately is the voice of reason.Well, I'll tell you a little secret. United Way of Central Maryland is doing things right lately.I recently met with Norm Taylor, executive director of our local United Way. Taylor is a soft-spoken, giant of a man, who is only now coming into his own in Baltimore.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
United Way of Central Maryland announced last night that it reached its fund-raising goal last year for the first time since 2001, raising $40.4 million. The organization had seen steep declines in recent years, hurt by the struggling economy and a financial scandal at the Washington, D.C., branch. The news came as a relief to many local nonprofit agencies that have faced funding shortfalls from United Way, as well as the state and federal government, and private donations. "That's what made this year's campaign so critical," said branch President Larry E. Walton, whose organization made the announcement at a volunteer event.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Hurt by a slow economy and news of scandal at its sister charity in Washington, the United Way of Central Maryland expects giving to fall $2 million short of last year - the first decrease in seven years. Charity officials are asking companies to extend their workplace campaigns, most of which ordinarily would have closed by now, to ask employees who haven't given to change their minds. They have also persuaded a number of companies, such as NeighborCare Inc., to start new, late campaigns in December and January.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
After a lackluster start, the United Way of Central Maryland seems to be gaining momentum in its annual fund-raising drive.Donations more than doubled in the past month, from $12.8 million to $28.3 million, a spokesman said. United Way, which started the campaign Sept. 23, has until Jan. 31 to reach its goal of $40 million."We think the message is getting out," spokesman Mel Tansill said. "Perhaps the anxiety level over the economy is finally over."United Way officials have maintained that Maryland's weak economy was their biggest concern going into the 1992 campaign.
NEWS
By Mel Tansill | August 5, 1992
No doubt you were concerned when you read or heard about allegations regarding William Aramony, former president of United Way of America (UWA), in February. You were concerned about allegations involving Mr. Aramony's salary, travel, out-of-town accommodations, his establishment spin-off corporations, and controversy about employment practices at the United Way. So were the staff and volunteers of United Way of Central Maryland -- our local United Way.The UWCM's 37-member volunteer Board of Directors was so concerned by the allegations that it acted quickly and decisively to reduce dues payments to UWA, its Virginia-based trade organization, by 10 percent.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
In its largest contribution ever to a single program, the United Way of Central Maryland announced a $10 million pledge yesterday to a project aimed at making metropolitan Baltimore a safer, healthier place for children.Previously, the most the local United Way has given any one charity was $1 million to Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland.The award to the Safe and Sound Campaign -- an independent offshoot of the Baltimore Community Foundation -- will focus on basic health needs of children from the prenatal stage through age 6.The grant is separate from the United Way's annual fund-raising campaign, which last year dispersed about $38 million.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,[sun reporter] | April 6, 2007
Unhappy about changes in the way the United Way allocates its grants, the Howard County executive said yesterday that he would like the county to break away from United Way of Central Maryland and form a competing local organization. County Executive Ken Ulman said he has heard from a number of local groups whose funding has been cut and that he is exploring the creation of a group to solicit funds from public and private donors for local charities. A spokeswoman for United Way of America said she does not know of a local government that has left the United Way in recent years.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2005
A federal commission voted yesterday to shake up the Air National Guard - including transferring out of state eight airlift planes from a Baltimore County unit - laying the foundation for a legal showdown over whether these airborne state militias are controlled by their governors or the Pentagon. The Pentagon had proposed removing all aircraft from nearly two dozen Air National Guard bases across the country while realigning dozens of other operations to cut costs. The nine-member Base Closure and Realignment Commission endorsed restructuring the Air Guard but did not accept Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's proposal in its entirety, picking and choosing from his list.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
United Way of Central Maryland announced last night that it reached its fund-raising goal last year for the first time since 2001, raising $40.4 million. The organization had seen steep declines in recent years, hurt by the struggling economy and a financial scandal at the Washington, D.C., branch. The news came as a relief to many local nonprofit agencies that have faced funding shortfalls from United Way, as well as the state and federal government, and private donations. "That's what made this year's campaign so critical," said branch President Larry E. Walton, whose organization made the announcement at a volunteer event.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
After two years of getting battered by corporate cutbacks and a drooping stock market, the United Way of Central Maryland announced yesterday that it hopes to raise $40.4 million this year, about 2 percent more than last. Larry Walton, president of the fund-raising organization, said he hopes to attract more first-time donors by emphasizing the United Way's original mission, helping the poor. For the first time in the fall, the area branch of the United Way will not accept donations directed to private schools, arts organizations or churches, Walton said.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Just days ago, the Army's 372nd Military Police Company, based near Cumberland, was the source of unabashed pride in the city, the reason yellow ribbons are tacked to tree trunks and fences, and why the Wal-Mart posts pictures of the unit's young soldiers near its doors. That changed somewhat Wednesday when the country found out what Cumberland-area residents had been whispering for weeks - that members of the unit, deployed in Iraq, have been accused of committing crimes against Iraqi prisoners in their custody.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
United Way of Central Maryland has ended its long-standing policy of allowing donors to earmark contributions for private schools and art institutions, a move that it expects to cause at least a temporary dip in the next fund-raising campaign. Starting with the local charity's 2004 campaign - scheduled to begin this summer - the group will accept only gifts that are designated for nonprofit organizations that have health or human services as their core mission, said Larry E. Walton, president and chief professional officer.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
After a lackluster start, the United Way of Central Maryland seems to be gaining momentum in its annual fund-raising drive.Donations more than doubled in the past month, from $12.8 million to $28.3 million, a spokesman said. United Way, which started the campaign Sept. 23, has until Jan. 31 to reach its goal of $40 million."We think the message is getting out," spokesman Mel Tansill said. "Perhaps the anxiety level over the economy is finally over."United Way officials have maintained that Maryland's weak economy was their biggest concern going into the 1992 campaign.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
The United Way of Central Maryland said it would announce today that Larry E. Walton, head of the United Way in Richmond, will become its new president and chief professional officer Jan. 1.Mr. Walton, 49, who emerged from 137 applicants, has led Richmond's United Way since 1981. During his time there, annual campaign revenues grew from $6.1 million to $21 million, said Joseph E. Blair Jr., chairman of United Way of Central Maryland.The local United Way is in the midst of its annual campaign, which aims to raise $37 million.
NEWS
April 16, 2003
The United Way of Central Maryland has lost its bid to take over a large charity campaign for government workers from its beleaguered sister charity in Washington. A federal coordinating panel awarded the contract yesterday for the Combined Federal Campaign of the National Capital Area to Global Impact, a group of 50 international humanitarian agencies that has run a similar campaign for overseas Department of Defense workers since 1996. The National Capital Area campaign raised more than $47 million last year.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Hurt by a slow economy and news of scandal at its sister charity in Washington, the United Way of Central Maryland expects giving to fall $2 million short of last year - the first decrease in seven years. Charity officials are asking companies to extend their workplace campaigns, most of which ordinarily would have closed by now, to ask employees who haven't given to change their minds. They have also persuaded a number of companies, such as NeighborCare Inc., to start new, late campaigns in December and January.
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