Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLocal Union
IN THE NEWS

Local Union

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
The Steelworkers union local at Sparrows Point has been taken over by its parent organization, a standard practice when a steel mill closes. United Steelworkers Local 9477 was put into "administratorship" in January, according to Jim Strong, the Baltimore-area director for the USW International. Strong has been appointed to oversee the local while it winds down operations. "They've begun the dissolution process, basically," said Chris MacLarion, vice president of the local at Sparrows Point before it was taken over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The dueling complaints by two port of Baltimore union officials alleging the other assaulted him now will be considered by residents of Baltimore, after their attorneys requested a jury trial in the case. Maryland District Court Judge Timothy D. Murphy approved the requests Tuesday. Riker "Rocky" McKenzie, president of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, filed a complaint on Nov. 8 alleging the union's then-secretary-treasurer, Daryl Wilburn, assaulted him during an altercation that morning at the local's Locust Point union hall.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Unionized longshoremen who work the docks at the port of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to reject a contract proposal from their employers, once again extending a labor standoff that has destabilized the state's primary trade hub for months. They did so with the backing of national labor officials, who warned that approval of the contract would mean millions of dollars pulled from the union's - and local longshoremen's - pockets. Others fear that continuing to work without a contract could have a more dire effect: ratcheting up concerns of labor instability among port customers and causing cargo to be diverted.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When a three-day strike by local longshoremen forced the 718-foot CCNI Antofagasta to sail out of the port of Baltimore without unloading its container cargo, the effects rippled across the country and overseas. Several shipping lines scrambled to reroute dozens of Baltimore-bound containers north again after the ship brought them back to Cartagena, Colombia, according to documents obtained from the Maryland Port Administration through a Maryland Public Information Act request. Chicago customers expecting to reuse Antofagasta containers emptied in Baltimore instead had to order them by rail from Savannah, Ga. The Antofagasta burned nearly 40,000 tons of additional fuel to make up for lost time and arrive on schedule at the Panama Canal.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- BP Oil Co. said yesterday that it will shut down its Marcus Hook, Pa., refinery this month in the wake of a breakdown in talks between unionized workers and the company that has agreed to buy the refinery.Most of the 535 people who work at the sprawling plant will lose their jobs. A shutdown also would have a widespread impact on the thousands of contract laborers and vendors who work at the plant each year, in addition to the maritime industry that moves petroleum shipments up the Delaware River.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Labor unions that represent government workers may not pay for their lobbying, political activity and public relations tactics out of support fees paid by non-members they represent, a widely split Supreme Court ruled yesterday.In a sweeping decision seeking to spell out constitutional limits on non-members' right not to have fees they pay to unions used for causes they oppose, the court curbed a good deal of public-employee union activity with non-member fees.The court was widely split in a case involving a union that represents faculty members at Ferris State College in Big Rapids, Mich.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When a three-day strike by local longshoremen forced the 718-foot CCNI Antofagasta to sail out of the port of Baltimore without unloading its container cargo, the effects rippled across the country and overseas. Several shipping lines scrambled to reroute dozens of Baltimore-bound containers north again after the ship brought them back to Cartagena, Colombia, according to documents obtained from the Maryland Port Administration through a Maryland Public Information Act request. Chicago customers expecting to reuse Antofagasta containers emptied in Baltimore instead had to order them by rail from Savannah, Ga. The Antofagasta burned nearly 40,000 tons of additional fuel to make up for lost time and arrive on schedule at the Panama Canal.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Bus drivers, dispatchers and other public transit employees in Baltimore will vote for a new local union president next week, following the ouster of their elected president by national union officials. Union officials said Janice Murray was removed as president of the 2,600-member Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1300 because she owed the organization $200 in travel expenses from six years ago. Murray's victory was appealed by a rival candidate, the local's former president, who said unpaid travel expenses invalidated her candidacy.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
Twenty officials of the largest local union at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point mill improperly received $217,000 from 1989 through 1991 by double-billing the union and receiving inflated wages, according to a union audit.The release of the audit results yesterday came four months after the international offices of the United Steelworkers of America took over Steelworkers Local 2610 and removed President Walter Scott and Treasurer Walter Stankiwicz."They ripped us off," Stanley Satchell, a 23-year veteran of the mill, said last night during a meeting to discuss the audit.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | June 14, 2009
Salary: $90,000 Age: 55 Years on the job: 36 How he got started: : After graduating from high school, Tom Hayes applied to the five-year apprenticeship program at the local union to become a steamfitter and welder. He worked in the construction field as a steamfitter and welder for about 23 years, serving on numerous union committees. He eventually sought election as a union business agent. After 12 years as a business agent, he was elected business manager. He's serving the first year of a three-year term.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
John Hopkins Hospital and the union representing housekeepers, food servers and other workers were unable to agree on a contract Thursday night, leaving open the possibility for a strike beginning April. 9. Local union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East is working on behalf of 2,000 hospital employees to push for wage increases. They say many of the workers are on food stamps Medicaid and other public assistance. A Hopkins spokeswoman reiterated Friday that hospital officials were working "to reach a settlement that's fair to everyone and reflects financial responsibility on the part of the hospital.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Bus drivers, dispatchers and other public transit employees in Baltimore will vote for a new local union president next week, following the ouster of their elected president by national union officials. Union officials said Janice Murray was removed as president of the 2,600-member Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1300 because she owed the organization $200 in travel expenses from six years ago. Murray's victory was appealed by a rival candidate, the local's former president, who said unpaid travel expenses invalidated her candidacy.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Unionized longshoremen who work the docks at the port of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to reject a contract proposal from their employers, once again extending a labor standoff that has destabilized the state's primary trade hub for months. They did so with the backing of national labor officials, who warned that approval of the contract would mean millions of dollars pulled from the union's - and local longshoremen's - pockets. Others fear that continuing to work without a contract could have a more dire effect: ratcheting up concerns of labor instability among port customers and causing cargo to be diverted.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Discord has erupted within the longshoremen's union at the heart of the labor dispute at the port of Baltimore, with some members calling for an end to the union's standoff with port employers and others promising to push on. The dissension is growing as the standoff begins to affect trade. Some customers have diverted cargo, fearing a second labor disruption in four months, a development some longshoreman believe portends more trouble for the business they depend on for survival.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Ernest B. Crofoot, a former labor organizer who later headed Council 67 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, died Friday of complications from cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 88. "Ernie was one hell of a trade unionist," said Ed A. Mohler, who went to work for Mr. Crofoot at AFSCME in 1968. "He put together a first-class staff at AFSCME and had people from the United Auto Workers, machinists, building trades and other unions who had a variety of experiences.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
The Steelworkers union local at Sparrows Point has been taken over by its parent organization, a standard practice when a steel mill closes. United Steelworkers Local 9477 was put into "administratorship" in January, according to Jim Strong, the Baltimore-area director for the USW International. Strong has been appointed to oversee the local while it winds down operations. "They've begun the dissolution process, basically," said Chris MacLarion, vice president of the local at Sparrows Point before it was taken over.
BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | July 6, 2006
Workers at Ford Motor Co.'s Chicago Stamping Plant have approved new work rules that the automaker hopes will serve as a model for other facilities as it struggles to make its American factories more efficient and cost-competitive. The new agreement aims to improve efficiency on the factory floor by dividing the plant's work force into more flexible production teams and loosening restrictions on job classifications so workers can be assigned to jobs where they are most needed. "There are significant improvements in flexibility," said Jim Sanfilippo, an analyst with AMCI in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The dueling complaints by two port of Baltimore union officials alleging the other assaulted him now will be considered by residents of Baltimore, after their attorneys requested a jury trial in the case. Maryland District Court Judge Timothy D. Murphy approved the requests Tuesday. Riker "Rocky" McKenzie, president of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, filed a complaint on Nov. 8 alleging the union's then-secretary-treasurer, Daryl Wilburn, assaulted him during an altercation that morning at the local's Locust Point union hall.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Dock workers and the management of 15 East Coast and Gulf ports reached a tentative agreement on a new master contract late Friday night, averting a threatened walkout on Wednesday. The six-year deal between the International Longshoremen's Association, which represents 14,500 workers, and the U.S. Maritime Alliance, which negotiates for ports and shipping companies, is still subject to ratification by both sides and to agreements between local unions and port managers. Details were not released.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
An image of Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's face on a roll of toilet paper recently circulated on the Internet has sparked turmoil within the local firefighters union whose members created it. The image, and another of Fire Chief James Clack's face in a toilet bowl, were determined to have been created and distributed online last month by two members of the Baltimore Firefighters Local 734 union who are now being disciplined, president Rick...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.