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By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | May 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could greatly increase competition for many local telephone companies, the Federal Communications Commission proposed a rule yesterday that would force them to let rivals plug directly into local telephone systems.The proposal, which officials hope will be adopted within 12 months, will be a big help for the growing number of operators of high-speed fiber optics lines that bypass the traditional telephone system.These companies allow customers to reach their long-distance carriers at prices considerably lower than the access charges imposed by local telephone companies.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
An AT&T Corp. attorney accused Verizon of Maryland Inc. yesterday of charging rival companies unfair and inflated prices to perform basic services such as line repairs and service disconnections. In a case before the Maryland Public Service Commission, AT&T already is challenging Verizon - which owns 97 percent of the lines used by other companies to provide local telephone service in Maryland - on the amount Verizon charges companies to lease its lines. Federal law requires larger companies to provide smaller rivals access to their networks to encourage competition.
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NEWS
July 22, 1997
NO LONGER can Bell Atlantic Corp. be considered a "Baby" Bell. Though spun off in the court-ordered break-up of AT&T, Bell Atlantic is about to become the East Coast giant of telephony, thanks to its accord with the Federal Communications Commission that paves the way for its $24 billion merger with Nynex Corp., the dominant telephone company in the Northeast.Combined, the new Bell Atlantic will control local phone service for 26 million customers from Maine to Virginia. It is the most lucrative market in the country, with 23 percent of the U.S. population and one-third of all long-distance traffic.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Verizon-Maryland, the state's dominant telephone company, would be forced to split into two operating units under legislation that will be introduced in the General Assembly today. Del. Joan F. Stern said she will sponsor a bill to break up the former Bell Atlantic-Maryland in order to ensure "vibrant and irreversible" competition in the local telephone market. "It's all about choice. Consumers should have choice, and we don't have it," the Montgomery County Democrat said. The legislation would require the Maryland subsidiary of Verizon Inc. to create two strictly separate entities: a competitive affiliate offering retail telephone service and a wholesale unit that would operate the network and sell access to other telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The FCC has given Bell Atlantic and the nation's seven other big providers of local telephone service greater freedom to raise or lower the prices they charge long-distance carriers for completing interstate calls.The move signals a fundamental shift in the economic philosophy of U.S. regulation. The charges account for about half the cost of placing a long-distance call.But the Federal Communications Commission declined to estimate the effect of yesterday's decision on long-distance carriers, and ultimately on consumers, because the charges will now depend more closely on the productivity of the local telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1997
NEW YORK -- Seeking a partner to invigorate its torpid local telephone strategy, AT&T Corp. is discussing a merger with GTE Corp., executives close to the talks said yesterday.A deal to merge the two companies could be worth $48 billion or more and would be the largest corporate takeover in American history, dwarfing WorldCom Inc.'s unsolicited bid of about $30 billion, announced last week, to acquire MCI Communications Corp.AT&T, the nation's largest long-distance telephone carrier, and GTE, one of the biggest local telephone companies, have been discussing a potential merger intermittently for at least a year, according to analysts and executives familiar with the two companies.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- MCI Communications Corp. plans to establish a full range of local telephone services to business customers in Baltimore and nine other big cities by the end of this year, in what will be the biggest assault yet by a long-distance company on the local Bell companies.MCI, based in Washington, said its primary focus would be on business rather than residential customers, at least initially. Smaller companies that have offered such services have been able to offer business customers sharply lower rates.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
MCI Communications Corp. introduced yesterday what it called a permanent solution to one of the biggest barriers to the emergence of robust competition in the local marketplace -- how to make telephone numbers truly "portable" for consumers who want to switch carriers.MCI said its plan will permit consumers and businesses to keep all the advanced features they now receive from their current carriers. Some interim number-portability arrangements proposed by telephone companies did not permit the use of such functions as Caller ID.MCI said the database system developed in its laboratory in Richardson, Texas, is compatible with existing telephone networks such as Bell Atlantic's and could be deployed with minimal cost.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1997
AT&T Corp. announced its first significant foray into the local telephone business yesterday, but the modest scope of its two new services underscored that AT&T was tiptoeing into this $100 billion market, even a year after it was thrown open to competition.Starting Feb. 3, AT&T said it would offer local phone service to small- and medium-size business customers in California. The long-distance carrier will not build its own local operations, but will lease lines on the existing local network of Pacific Telesis Group.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Thomas W. Waldron and Michael Dresser and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writers | July 27, 1993
Urging Maryland to emerge from the "Jurassic Period" of local telephone service, an upstart telecommunications company asked state regulators yesterday to end the monopoly of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland.MFS Communications Co. Inc. told the Public Service Commission (PSC) that it wants to offer local telephone exchange services to small, medium and large business customers throughout the state.In the most sweeping challenge ever mounted to C&P's protected role in Maryland, MFS called on the PSC "to abandon the outdated and antiquated concept of the natural monopoly" in local telephone services.
NEWS
By Mark N. Cooper | October 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Local telephone competition in Maryland, where Verizon Communications has managed to perpetuate a virtual monopoly, seems no closer than it was four years ago, when the federal Telecommunications Act was adopted. Currently, consumers in only two states -- New York and Texas -- enjoy the benefits of local and long-distance telephone competition. It is clear why it took so long to open up those phone markets: the "Baby Bells" tried mightily to get into long-distance without first truly allowing competitors into their local markets.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- SBC Communications Inc., the No. 2 U.S. local phone company, received Federal Communications Commission approval yesterday of its $81.1 billion purchase of Ameritech Corp., the No. 5 local company.The approval includes an unprecedented set of 30 conditions aimed at promoting local phone competition in the Ameritech and SBC regions and encouraging the development of advanced telecommunications services. The companies agreed to pay $2 billion in penalties if they fail to meet the conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1999
Visit Tiffany Dowling's apartment at Briar Cliff East in Cockeysville and look closely at her telephone. Yes, it looks like a phone, rings like a phone, and when she calls her mom, even sounds like a phone.But there's a difference between her phone and yours: At the end of the month, her bill doesn't come from Bell Atlantic, but from Comcast Corp. For Dowling and 100 or so others around Baltimore, the local cable television company is also the local phone company."It's nice to have a choice," she says.
NEWS
March 7, 1999
Police lauded for handling of recent standoff On Feb. 26, I was one of the residents of Chatham Garden Apartments in Ellicott City who had to be evacuated by police because of the unfortunate standoff that began in the early morning. At 8 a.m., residents in our area had to leave and were transported by police to the Church of the Resurrection nearby. I commend the officers of the State Police and Howard County for the professional and compassionate manner in which they handled the situation.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing | February 7, 1999
AFTER American Telephone & Telegraph Co. was broken up in 1984, it struggled to redefine itself. The nation's largest long-distance company was challenged by new rivals, stymied by rapid technological change and haunted by its own poor strategic decisions.Now, under Chairman and Chief Executive Officer C. Michael Armstrong, AT&T Corp. is waging a comeback, entering new markets through partnerships with such firms as British Telecommunications PLC and through acquisitions of companies like local telephone provider Teleport Communications Group Inc. (TCG)
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court waded into the maze of new legal rules for local telephone service yesterday, as the companies with a monopoly in that area complained that potential competitors want "a free ride on our networks."In a two-hour hearing on the meaning of the Telecommunications Act passed two years ago, the justices seemed confused not only about a myriad of details of that law but also about what Congress had intended to achieve.Little time was spent weighing the effects on telephone users, in homes and businesses, as the hearing parsed the law, section by section, technical phrase by technical phrase, word by word.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
MCI Communications, the nation's second-largest long-distance company, launched a direct attack on Bell Atlantic Corp.'s primacy in Maryland yesterday as it asked the Public Service Commission for permission to compete in the local telephone business.For now, MCI's petition to the Maryland Public Service Commission deals only with service to businesses. But Nate Davis, chief operating officer of the MCI Metro subsidiary, said the company will seek permission to enter the residential market for local telephone service within the next few years.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing | February 7, 1999
AFTER American Telephone & Telegraph Co. was broken up in 1984, it struggled to redefine itself. The nation's largest long-distance company was challenged by new rivals, stymied by rapid technological change and haunted by its own poor strategic decisions.Now, under Chairman and Chief Executive Officer C. Michael Armstrong, AT&T Corp. is waging a comeback, entering new markets through partnerships with such firms as British Telecommunications PLC and through acquisitions of companies like local telephone provider Teleport Communications Group Inc. (TCG)
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1997
NEW YORK -- Seeking a partner to invigorate its torpid local telephone strategy, AT&T Corp. is discussing a merger with GTE Corp., executives close to the talks said yesterday.A deal to merge the two companies could be worth $48 billion or more and would be the largest corporate takeover in American history, dwarfing WorldCom Inc.'s unsolicited bid of about $30 billion, announced last week, to acquire MCI Communications Corp.AT&T, the nation's largest long-distance telephone carrier, and GTE, one of the biggest local telephone companies, have been discussing a potential merger intermittently for at least a year, according to analysts and executives familiar with the two companies.
NEWS
July 22, 1997
NO LONGER can Bell Atlantic Corp. be considered a "Baby" Bell. Though spun off in the court-ordered break-up of AT&T, Bell Atlantic is about to become the East Coast giant of telephony, thanks to its accord with the Federal Communications Commission that paves the way for its $24 billion merger with Nynex Corp., the dominant telephone company in the Northeast.Combined, the new Bell Atlantic will control local phone service for 26 million customers from Maine to Virginia. It is the most lucrative market in the country, with 23 percent of the U.S. population and one-third of all long-distance traffic.
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