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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
Howard residents will have a chance to tell their General Assembly representatives tonight what they think about two proposed local taxes and a measure that would allow a restaurant-brewery in the county.The tax bills aren't aimed at county residents, however, but at the pocketbooks of people who stay in hotels here or who might be attending NFL football games in Laurel.Del. Martin G. Madden, R-District 13B, is sponsoring a bill that would let the County Council impose a tax on any parking space in the county within a certain distance of a proposed new football stadium for the Washington Redskins in Laurel.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014
The departure of Sun Products from Baltimore has rekindled letters and statements suggesting that Maryland's taxes are driving businesses out of the state ( "Sun Products move should be a wake-up call for tax-happy Md.," Feb. 13). No serious businessmen could make that statement. As a retired business CEO in Maryland, it is apparent to me that tax differentials between states are insignificant in a company's financial situation compared to other locational criteria. Location decisions are made primarily on the basis of demand for your products or services, the quality and adequacy of the local labor force, cost of materials, energy and transportation, location of markets, and quality of life that is increasingly important to attract talented employees.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
Income taxes in Howard County are up by 30 percent. The state's property tax rate increased, as did Anne Arundel County's. Water and sewer rates are rising in most of the region, including Baltimore City and Baltimore, Carroll and Harford counties. And home assessments made their biggest leap in more than 12 years. But as Marylanders begin preparing 2003 tax returns, they'll discover they will be left with more, not less money, in their pockets -- thanks to federal income tax cuts. When state and local tax increases are offset by those federal cuts, the bottom line is appealing: A middle-class family of four in the Baltimore area could have more than $3,000 extra in the bank.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Those things that make Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller a formidable adversary in Annapolis can sure come in handy sometimes. This week, he single-handedly restored to relevancy one of the most important issues facing Maryland - a looming shortfall in transportation funding - that others in his party seem to regard as radioactive. Call him irascible, call him egotistical, call him a bull in a china shop, but the real lesson here is to always call on the longest-serving Senate leader in Maryland history when it's time to pick up an unpopular cause like raising the gas tax. The veteran Prince George's County politician may often be wrong, but he's never in doubt.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1998
The 10 percent state income tax cut enacted last year has resulted in lower taxes but more confusion, according to the Maryland Comptroller's Office.The tax cut affects state taxes, not the local taxes levied by Maryland's 23 counties and Baltimore City, which are based on the pre-tax cut rate, said Assistant Comptroller Marvin A. Bond.Because the local tax is no longer a straight percentage of the state tax, separate calculations are now necessary. As a result, many employee pay stubs for the first time are showing separate withholding amounts for state and local income taxes, he said.
BUSINESS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
So by now you may have figured out that the new Maryland tax form can be a pain in the neck. The one-page "short" sheet is gone, replaced by a longer, headache-inducing form with different rates and sets of exemptions for state and local taxes.Well, next year the short form is coming back. Legislators have to file taxes, too, and they have passed a bill getting rid of the extra work sheets and calculations.It may be too late for this year's tax day, but for next April taxpayers can count on a one-page form.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
The next time you stay in a county hotel, put your boat in a slip atthe Havre de Grace marina or use your phone, you may have to pay a little more in local taxes.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann wants permission from the state for the county to start charging a rangeof new user and product taxes.Rehrmann wants to take advantage of state law that permits counties, with the permission of the General Assembly, to charge any of 12 local taxes: room taxes at hotels and motels, and taxes on cable television, telephone service, natural gas, fuel oil, coal, steam, electric, liquid petroleum, beverage containers, boat slips and parking lots.
NEWS
April 24, 1991
No matter how you slice the pie, taxes are a burden, and the way that burden falls on various groups is a good measure of a society's concern with fairness and equity. This country's commitment to those ideals has been called into question by a new study of state and local taxes. Citizens for Tax Justice, the private research group that released the study this week, has found that the burden of state and local taxes falls much more heavily on poor and middle-class Americans than on affluent taxpayers.
NEWS
December 30, 1991
President Bush's read-my-lips, no-new-taxes pledge served well enough to get him elected but was quickly discarded when it became necessary to do so once he was in office. There were new taxes -- for everyone, that is, except, well, George Bush.Money magazine has just revealed that Bush, by skillfully traversing the arcane labyrinth of federal, state and local tax laws in the United States, has managed to escape paying state levies almost entirely -- at a time when virtually every state is compelled to raise taxes to meet the social starvation resulting from a decade of the Reagan-Bush 1981 federal tax cuts.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 18, 2004
BUSINESSES, as Ricky said to Lucy, you got some splainin' to do. You keep beefing about taxes, but you contribute less to state and local taxes in Maryland, in percentage terms, than in any other state in the country. You can look it up. Prompted by claims that business doesn't pay its fair share, the Council on State Taxation hired a consultant to analyze business taxes across the nation. The study came out last month. In Maryland, business' share of state and local taxes was 32 percent, the least in any state.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Baltimore and Maryland's counties could impose their own 5-cents-a-gallon tax on gas to pay for local roads and buses under a proposal by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. Miller also proposed Thursday leasing a state toll highway to a private operator to raise money for mass-transit projects in Baltimore and the Washington suburbs. His proposal comes as lawmakers in Annapolis are struggling to find ways to raise money for transportation projects they say are long overdue.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
The budget package passed by the Maryland state Senate has many good elements -- investments in local schools, a cap on tuition hikes at public colleges, more money for road repairs and cuts in nonessential spending. However, it also includes a provision making it easier for county councils to override voter-imposed property tax limits. Five counties - Prince George's, Montgomery, Anne Arundel, Talbot, and Wicomico - currently have such limits. Whether or not you think your local property tax rate is high enough to support good schools, we should all be able to agree that the voters' will ought to be respected.
NEWS
July 21, 2011
For Baltimore to thrive in coming years, it must attract new residents and businesses - perhaps as many as 100,000 new jobs and residents each over the next two decades. The populations most likely to fuel this growth are young professionals, empty-nesters and immigrants. To attract these populations, Baltimore requires a clear-eyed focus on improving livability. That will require changing the regressive property tax through which the city currently finances its government, which is the highest in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,Tribune Media Services | August 31, 2008
Q. When investing in municipal bonds, how and why do you calculate the tax-equivalent yield? - H.E., via the Internet A. A municipal bond is a debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to finance its capital expenditures. It is exempt from federal taxes and from most state and local taxes. The tax-equivalent yield is the pretax yield that a taxable bond needs for its yield to equal to that of a tax-free municipal bond. "Munis usually make sense for investors in the 25 percent or higher tax brackets," said Mark Balasa, certified financial planner.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | August 26, 2007
By now you've surely heard of Maryland's $1.5 billion "structural deficit," a giant pothole in the state budget that's spurring talk of big tax increases, spending cuts, slot machines and more. Republicans and Democrats agree the deficit is no abstract menace, but a real problem that has to be solved. It has been brewing for years, spurred by a variety of factors, but mostly by an income-tax cut in late 1998, combined with a decision in 2002 to vastly increase spending on K-12 education.
NEWS
July 23, 2007
The Sun's article "State leaders look at Md. income taxes" (July 19) was a good start at engaging the attention of taxpayers in the discussion about how to address the state's $1.5 billion structural deficit. And, yes, Maryland's income tax could be made more progressive. But the role of business in carrying the tax burden also needs to be brought into the discussion. According to a February report from the Council on State Taxation comparing the tax burdens of business among the states for fiscal 2006, Maryland ranks No. 48 (tied with Oregon)
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,Tribune Media Services | August 31, 2008
Q. When investing in municipal bonds, how and why do you calculate the tax-equivalent yield? - H.E., via the Internet A. A municipal bond is a debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to finance its capital expenditures. It is exempt from federal taxes and from most state and local taxes. The tax-equivalent yield is the pretax yield that a taxable bond needs for its yield to equal to that of a tax-free municipal bond. "Munis usually make sense for investors in the 25 percent or higher tax brackets," said Mark Balasa, certified financial planner.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 4, 1991
WHAT! Another big tax bill taking shape on Capitol Hill? How could they? Why should they? How dare they?Dare they will -- in 1992. Election-year politics are likely to churn up federal tax-cut proposals of every ilk next year, from schemes to cut capital gains taxes and unfairly put more money in the pockets of rich investors to those that would benefit the less well off but bore a gaping new hole into federal revenues.If we are going to go through this again -- and it seems likely -- at least it should be done right.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 2, 2005
Hurricane Katrina couldn't do it. Three-dollar gas couldn't do it. Alan Greenspan hasn't done it, although he's trying harder than ever. None of them has stopped the U.S. economy, which is chugging along, slowly creating jobs and spreading prosperity. What's going to cause the next recession? Cue the President's Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform. With laser precision, the panel aimed its biggest tax-reform bullet at the industry that almost single-handedly has kept the economy afloat for years: residential housing.
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