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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | June 24, 1992
Say goodbye to Garfield, the Ninja Turtles and the Muppet Babies. In another example of the dramatically changing face of television, WBAL (Channel 11) yesterday announced it is canceling all Saturday morning cartoons as of July 18.The CBS affiliate said it is dumping Saturday morning network programming and replacing it with a 4 1/2 -hour locally produced news show designed to look like CNN, with the cycle of stories repeated every half hour. The local news show will also run Sunday mornings, but Channel 11 will continue to carry CBS' "Sunday Morning" as part of its lineup.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Wednesday that it plans to buy eight television stations from New Age Media for $90 million, continuing a string of recent station acquisitions. The stations are spread throughout three markets, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, Pa., Tallahassee, Fla., and Gainesville, Fla., and give the broadcaster a mix of FOX, MyNetwork, CW, CBS and NBC affiliates. "We are excited to be adding the New Age stations to our portfolio, growing our presence in Pennsylvania and Florida, and further diversifying our affiliation mix," CEO David Smith said in the company's announcement.
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NEWS
April 4, 1997
THE SUPREME COURT'S decision requiring cable companies to continue to carry local broadcasters is as much a victory for congressional authority as for local broadcasters. Writing for a 5-4 majority, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy noted that "Congress has an independent interest in preserving a multiplicity of broadcasters to ensure that all households have access to information and entertainment on an equal footing with those who subscribe to cable."Since the ruling upholds current practice, viewers will not see major changes resulting from the court's action.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. will renew Fox Broadcasting Co. affiliations with 19 of its television stations in an agreement that also allows Sinclair to purchase a Fox-owned station in Baltimore. Under the agreement with Fox, Sinclair has the option to buy WUTB, Fox's MyNetwork station in Baltimore, for up to $52.7 million between July 1 and March 31, 2013. Sinclair negotiated for the option to strengthen its position as owner of a Fox affiliate in Baltimore, one of the broadcaster's most important markets, David Smith, Sinclair's chief executive and president, said in a statement.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | February 13, 2008
Last week on Super Tuesday, all-news cable TV made it plain that CNN, MSNBC and Fox News have displaced the major networks this primary season as the best on-screen source for political coverage. Last night, the 24/7 cable news channels were again dominant, but this time they stole the thunder from local TV news operations - making area broadcasters that were unwilling to cut into network prime-time programming seem all but irrelevant with their 11 p.m. newscasts in cities such as Baltimore.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 6, 1993
Today is an important one for cable TV subscribers. It's the deadline for cable operators to inform them which local stations and network shows, like popular sitcoms "Roseanne" and "Seinfeld," they might not see on cable after Oct. 6. This, like the recent rate restructuring, comes courtesy of the 1992 Cable TV Act.And what cable customers are finding out leaves many of them confused and worried.Area cable operators do not yet have permission from the majority of Baltimore and Washington network affiliates to carry their programming.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 31, 2002
Twenty-six homicides in a month. A 13-year-old caught in a drive-by shooting. A triple killing in South Baltimore. A teen slain while trying to steal a bicycle. July would seem to have been one troubled stretch for the city, leading local news stations to serve up an unhappy cocktail of violence and fear. That leaves viewers with a key question: How could you tell the difference from any other month? The truth about television news on local stations is that it is almost always unrelentingly defined by the violence it serves up at the top of the hour.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | May 23, 2001
Mark Twain once wrote that there were "lies, damn lies, and statistics." Hard to believe that the man died 19 years before the advent of television. First, let's deal with ratings. The May "sweeps" period, of smothering importance to local stations and networks, is pulling to a close after tonight. The ratings estimates from Nielsen Media are unlikely to be affected much by the final nights. So, according to station officials - and those statistics - we can say: WBAL is happy. Channel 11's late newscast at 11 p.m. has asserted its dominance over that time slot, considered the main event for local markets.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Understand this: Television news loves bad weather. It lives for bad weather. So local stations felt they had a lot to live for yesterday as Hurricane Isabel swept toward Maryland. "It's the perfect television story," said Scott Livingston, news director of WBFF-TV. "You hope no one gets harmed, but you don't know what's going to happen." Stations expanded coverage - adding hours here, brief cut-ins there, with a whole lot of weather maps. News conferences from Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. were given extensive live coverage.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 28, 1990
TONIGHT'S FINAL broadcast of WJZ's "Evening" magazine show at 7:30 on Channel 13 is not just the end of a television show, it's the sad end of an era in Baltimore television.WJZ rose to its position of dominance in the ratings on the back of a sturdy philosophy espoused by the late Don McGannon, longtime head of its parent company, Westinghouse's Group W, who preached the importance of local television.Indeed, McGannon was instrumental in pushing through the idea of taking the half hour from 7:30 to 8 o'clock away from the networks and giving it to local stations to program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
In the new world of endless channels and multiple ways to watch TV, you almost never see as dramatic a change in viewing as the one unfolding in Baltimore this fall. After a year of speculation about how the end of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" would affect the fortunes of local stations, the October "sweeps" ratings period shows WJZ surpassing longtime ratings champ WBAL in the afternoon and early evening. Call it the aftereffect of the legendary Oprah Factor. Even if she hasn't yet found a way to translate her ratings magic to her new cable channel OWN, Winfrey still has an impact on local TV. Last October, WBAL, Baltimore's Hearst-owned NBC affiliate, was drawing 74,700 total viewers from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
When Scott Garceau was forced out of the sports anchor chair at Baltimore's ABC affiliate, competitors said it was a desperate move by a station trying to cut costs. But since 2008, many stations across the country have scaled back on sports in their late newscasts as well. And this week, Baltimore's WBFF-TV — known for its extensive sports coverage — will consider joining their ranks. The Fox affiliate will experiment with dropping its 15-minute "Sports Unlimited" segment in favor a shortened sports report within the body of the show.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
Most of us look to our local radio stations as reliable sources for news and music. We tune into them at home, at work, in the car, and pretty much anywhere we go with a radio or device that allows us to stream our favorite stations. As a business owner, I also view local radio stations as an important resource for growth since they offer affordable advertising that helps me reach potential customers. Even though local radio stations are important resources to the communities they serve, the recording industry is pushing for a new tax that would drive some of them out of business and ultimately force others to cut staff and budgets for community-oriented activities such as charity events and disaster relief.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
One of the most depressing media stories of the past two decades has been the dwindling amount of political coverage provided by network news organizations and their affiliates. The snapshot regularly used to make the case was Election Night, with nonstop, wall-to-wall news coverage in the 1960s pared down to an hour or two in recent years so that the networks would not have to pre-empt dramas, sitcoms and reality TV shows even on the nights Americans went to the polls. But this year, there will be more coverage than ever — even more than there was in the so-called glory years of the 1960s and '70s.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
The economy is still on shaky ground. The state has few major primary showdowns. And by the general elections, there will likely be only a handful of top-dollar, hotly contested races here. Yet political ad spending on Baltimore television could break the 2006 record of $17 million by the midterm elections on Nov. 2. Local radio is going to have a banner year as well, analysts say, thanks to a Supreme Court ruling opening the floodgates on advocacy advertising. Meanwhile, deep-pocketed Democrats will be spending big over the airwaves to counter anti-incumbent sentiment in these contentious times.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama's call for a delay in next month's conversion from analog to digital TV appears to be gaining support, although local television stations are still preparing for the Feb. 17 switch that has been in the works for more than a decade. As directed by Congress during the Clinton administration, broadcast TV stations in the U.S. - that is, those that can be received without a cable or satellite system - will be switching their transmission signals from the traditional analog to digital.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,New York Daily News | January 9, 1992
Action for Children's Television, which for 23 years fought for better TV programming for children, will go out of business by the end of the year, president Peggy Charren announced yesterday.The organization, which Charren founded in her Cambridge, Mass., living room, is closing up because it achieved one of its main goals with the passage of the 1990 Children's Television Act, whose guidelines took effect Jan. 1, 1992.The new law limits the number of ads broadcasters may run in children's shows and requires local stations to air educational programs in order to get their licenses renewed.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
*TC After fighting the NFL pre-game show battle with Fox and ESPN with a hand tied behind its back, NBC joined the club and expanded its "NFL on NBC" to an hour, beginning next season, in an announcement made at the league's meetings in West Palm Beach, Fla., yesterday.In expanding the show from its current 30-minute format, NBC made a number of affiliate-friendly moves that helped sell the move to local stations that might not have been so willing to accommodate the sports division.For instance, NBC has promised to give five minutes of commercial time to local stations in the first half-hour to sell as their own to compensate for the revenue that might be lost by the expansion, which, in some markets, like Baltimore, will cut into lucrative local Sunday news shows.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | February 13, 2008
Last week on Super Tuesday, all-news cable TV made it plain that CNN, MSNBC and Fox News have displaced the major networks this primary season as the best on-screen source for political coverage. Last night, the 24/7 cable news channels were again dominant, but this time they stole the thunder from local TV news operations - making area broadcasters that were unwilling to cut into network prime-time programming seem all but irrelevant with their 11 p.m. newscasts in cities such as Baltimore.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | June 24, 2007
LIKE MUCH OF AMERICA, MARYLAND IS GOING "green," with green houses, green schools and green libraries. But a green gas station? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? Even as customers fuel their gas guzzlers, a new BP station near downtown Baltimore aims, through its design, to be more friendly to nature. From the road, the gas station looks deceptively conventional -- with six pumps, a convenience store and a car wash. What sets it apart is that the store and the car wash have "living roofs": soil and vegetation that keep rainwater from running into storm drains and ultimately into Baltimore's harbor, carrying the pollutants and toxins of the city with it. The BP station opened this spring at 1465 Key Highway, the first business on the road's $13.8 million, quarter-mile extension deeper into Locust Point.
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