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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
The Public Service Commission added more yeast to the ferment in the local telephone industry yesterday as it decided to let MCI Communications Corp. jump into the scramble for Maryland business customers.The PSC voted unanimously to approve MCI's Oct. 4 petition to go into competition with Bell Atlantic Corp. Over Bell Atlantic's objections, the commission decided to forgo a full hearing.It ruled that the MCI petition was essentially identical to one submitted by MFS Communications Co. Inc. of Omaha, Neb.The commission approved the petition of MFS in April, kicking down the decades-old barriers to competition in the business of providing a local dial tone.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Canton has traditionally been a blue-collar neighborhood, and for more than 100 years, the Canton Railroad Co. has been a part of that mix, moving freight for local industries and the port of Baltimore. Its locomotives are a familiar — and at times frustrating — sight for those traveling into Canton from the east, where the company's tracks crisscross Boston and O'Donnell streets. Long trains sometimes mean long waits for drivers. John C. Magness, the company's president and CEO, said the state-owned railroad's core mission continues.
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BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court took no action yesterday on the high-stakes legal conflict over the future of local telephone service, raising the prospect that the dispute could soon wind up back in Congress' hands.Yesterday was the last day that the court was likely to accept cases for the term that ends in July, and the justices had said they would study eight separate appeals on the telephone matter at yesterday's private session.They did so, but then issued orders that did not include a review of the telephone dispute.
EXPLORE
November 19, 2012
An article in the Nov. 23, 1912, edition of The Argus reported a raid on a local drinking establishment. Samuel Bloom saloon on Frederick road at Paradise was raided Sunday night at 7 o'clock by Patrolmen Hutson and Phelps , of the Canton Police Station. The patrolmen, who were dressed in plain clothes, say they entered the saloon and ordered bottle beer which was served to them. They then arrested Samuel Bloom , John Hall , a helper, and two other men as witnesses.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Allegiance Telecom Inc., a Dallas telephone company, said yesterday that it has been granted permission by the Public Service Commission to provide local phone service in Maryland.The company will offer service in Washington suburbs early next year. It plans to introduce Baltimore-area service in late 1999 at the earliest.Allegiance President and Chief Operating Officer Dan Yost said the privately owned company will open a series of offices in Maryland."We certainly will be hiring sales teams as well as some operations management in the area," he said.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
The big state contract for local phone service turned out to be a case of call waiting yesterday, as officials asked for bids on a deal much smaller than some of the new local phone players had hoped for.Officials at the state Department of Budget and Management asked only for proposals to serve new state buildings, small state offices with fewer than 31 phone lines, and offices where phone service or equipment is being replaced.Preston Dillard, the state's telecommunications director, said the state estimates that about $15 million worth of business will be available over a three-year period.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, clearing the way for a major restructuring of the telephone industry and maybe a price break for consumers, approved a sweeping opportunity yesterday for the nation's long-distance companies to compete for local phone business.By a 5-3 vote, the court approved broad new power for the Federal Communications Commission to oversee local competition, including authority to select a pricing method for the charges new competitors will pay to use local companies' existing facilities and services.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
LCI International Inc. will begin to offer local phone service in Maryland in March, as the nation's seventh-largest long-distance company prepares to resell phone-service packages it will buy wholesale from Bell Atlantic Corp.The arrangements between Maryland's phone monopoly and the McLean, Va.-based upstart are rooted in the federal telecommunications reform law that President Clinton signed a year ago today. The act requires traditional local exchange carriers like Bell Atlantic to sell newcomers the right to use all or part of their call-handling networks, hoping that such limited competition will let newcomers earn profits they can invest in new, more modern systems.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
In another move toward eroding Bell Atlantic Corp.'s hold on local phone service in Maryland, MFS Communications Co. is asking state regulators for permission to sell local service to residential customers, in addition to the business callers MFS usually serves.In a meeting today, Maryland's Public Service Commission is expected to consider the upstart carrier's application to expand from serving a small number of major customers to being eligible to serve consumers statewide.The application is part of a flurry of new competition sparked, in part, by the telecommunications reform law Congress approved Feb. 1. In a sign of the way proponents hope deregulation will cut prices, MFS' plan calls for consumers to pay $27.40 a month for a souped-up service, including call waiting and seven other options, that now costs more than $30 monthly to buy from Bell Atlantic.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
Saying talks on the future of local telephone competition have left them far apart, AT&T Corp. and Bell Atlantic Corp. yesterday asked regulators in Maryland to arbitrate the price AT&T will pay Bell Atlantic for access to the local phone market.The Basking Ridge, N.J.-based long-distance giant plans to enter the local phone business by buying service wholesale from Bell Atlantic and other regional Bell operating companies, then turning around and selling the same service to consumers. Over time, the company plans to build its own network.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
As of 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has imposed mandatory travel restrictions on city roads until noon Tuesday. Restrictions do not apply to uniformed personnel, hospital employees, other medical providers and Corporate Emergency Access System partners. "We need folks to stay off the roads so that our first responders can focus 100 percent on real emergency accidents as they may occur," the mayor said. "We are working closely with our hospitals and medical providers to ensure that their employees have safe routes to work.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has granted Maryland $2.3 million to help people living in public housing find opportunities for job training and education. The money will be used to hire local “service coordinators” who will work with people living in public housing, or receiving financial assistance from the government to pay for housing, find services that will lead to employment, according to a statement Friday from the department. In addition to connecting public housing residents with job training and educational opportunities, the coordinators will be able to guide public assistance recipients to childcare, transportation, and counseling, and computer and budgeting lessons, HUD said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Last year, Aaron Marchanti invited his father to the annual Memorial Day ceremony at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. On Monday, he returned to the event to honor him. Maj. Robert J. Marchanti II, a member of the Maryland National Guard who went to Afghanistan to help train that country's security forces, was shot to death inside a ministry building in Kabul in February. The Baltimore County man was one of seven Marylanders remembered Monday at the cemetery in Timonium. "Memorial Day was always important growing up because my dad's been in the military my whole life," Aaron Marchanti said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
County Executive Ken Ulman stood this week for a news conference, threatening to reduce library hours, cut police positions and cancel local Fourth of July fireworks if the state decides to shift the cost of teacher pensions to local governments. Ulman's warnings, repeated by about a dozen county agency heads outside the Harper's Choice Village Center on Thursday, came amid a series of similar events held by local officials throughout the state. All warned that the cost-sharing plan proposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley would lead to painful decisions far beyond their school systems.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
If Frederick increasingly is known for its trendy restaurants and shops, its historical roots remain a part of its fabric, from a City Hall built on the site of an early protest against British rule to a mall and minor league baseball team named after hometown hero Francis Scott Key. Now, another revolution could be fomenting as Frederick County considers a radical change to the way it does government business: It is debating whether to outsource many...
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
When Erica Earl gets congested and wheezy, her choices for medical care are straightforward: She can go to a community health clinic in East Baltimore that receives federal funding, or she can head to the emergency room. Earl, a 43-year-old nursing student, prefers the clinic — and that's the choice doctors, politicians of both parties and hospital executives want patients to make. But at the same time, the nation's 8,000 community clinics that serve millions of low-income patients are bracing for a $600 million cut in federal aid under the budget compromise approved by Congress on Thursday.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1997
AT&T Corp. announced its first significant foray into the local telephone business yesterday, but the modest scope of its two new services underscored that AT&T was tiptoeing into this $100 billion market, even a year after it was thrown open to competition.Starting Feb. 3, AT&T said it would offer local phone service to small- and medium-size business customers in California. The long-distance carrier will not build its own local operations, but will lease lines on the existing local network of Pacific Telesis Group.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
A tiny Annapolis Junction-based phone company got a powerful boost from MCI Communications Corp. yesterday, as the long-distance giant tapped American Communications Services Inc. to handle parts of both its long-distance service and its emerging local phone service business.ACSI stock rose $1.625 to $11.125 on the news, though neither side would say how much revenue the deal will bring ACSI during its five-year term. ACSI is one of a breed of smaller phone companies that have sprung up to challenge the Baby Bells for control of the $100 billion local phone industry, especially the lucrative business markets.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
The Maryland Transit Administration is making wholesale changes to the schedule for the MARC Penn Line, pinning its hopes of reducing rush-hour crowding and locomotive breakdowns on a plan to run shorter trains at more frequent intervals. The agency said it plans to break its MARC trains into six- and seven-car sets that will carry fewer passengers at once but run more often. With two trains added to both the morning and afternoon peaks, transit officials believe they can add 1,000 seats each rush hour.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | March 24, 2005
INTERNET PHONE service, with its promise of cheap, unlimited long-distance calling, is a hot technology these days. But potential customers quickly discover one big disadvantage: It doesn't really replace a local phone line. The two main drawbacks are questionable access to 911 emergency systems and a general vulnerability to power blackouts and Internet service disruptions. So I was intrigued by a new offering from one of the older hands in this relatively young market, DialpadUSA. Instead of trying to replace your local phone line, Dialpad works with it, adding unlimited long-distance calling over the Internet for $11.99 a month.
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