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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Two-thirds of Maryland's 24 local school boards have agreed to sign on to education reforms they hope could earn the state as much as $250 million more in federal aid this year, but teachers unions appear to be far less supportive, which could weaken the state's position. All of the largest school districts in the Baltimore area have voted to sign the Race to the Top application, including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties. But local teachers unions, with the exception of the Baltimore Teachers Union, say they won't be signing or haven't taken a position.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 29, 2012
As president of the Maryland School Bus Contractors Association I was dismayed to read about speed cameras in Baltimore City and Baltimore County catching school bus drivers violating posted speed limits in school zones ("Speed cameras catch school buses," Oct. 24). This is a serious issue that needed to be brought to light. While the MSBCA does not currently represent any school bus contractors in Baltimore City and has no affiliation with the companies referred to in the article, we do represent a significant number of companies that contract with local school boards throughout the state and take the subject of your report to heart.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2003
A Denver judge struck down Colorado's new school voucher law yesterday, ruling that it violates the state constitution by stripping local school boards of their control over education. "The goals of the voucher program are laudable," wrote District Judge Joseph E. Meyer III. "However, even great ideas must be implemented within the framework of the Colorado Constitution. By stripping all discretion from the local district over the instruction to be provided in the voucher program, the General Assembly has violated article IX, section 15."
NEWS
July 28, 2011
Montgomery County school board officials deserve congratulations for their decision this week to allow the first charter school to open in the district. For years, board members resisted pressure to authorize charter schools, arguing they would distract from efforts to improve a school system that was already regarded as one of the best in the country. The dynamic there was the same one that has slowed the charter school movement in nearly every Maryland school district; critics complain that everywhere except Baltimore City, local officials have simply sought to avoid the competition from publicly financed but independently operated charters.
TOPIC
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Maryland school board's pronouncement this week that only the state can fire county superintendents might have been news to most local school boards, but it's been the law of the state for more than eight decades. It can be traced back to a Johns Hopkins University graduate who is best known for overhauling American medical schools in the early 1900s. That man is Abraham Flexner, and it was his 1916 scathing analysis of the condition of public education in Maryland that accounts for much of the educational governance structure still in existence today.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Sen. Charles H. Smelser said yesterday that he introduced a bill to limit educational mandates because of a requirement that Maryland students perform volunteer work to graduate.Mr. Smelser, a Democrat who represents Carroll and Frederick counties, said the Maryland Board of Education should not have imposed the graduation requirement last year when local boards opposed it.He introduced Senate Bill 242 to require the General Assembly to pay for any mandate that would cost $250,000 to implement statewide.
NEWS
December 1, 1997
THE TROUBLES at Northern High School in Baltimore City are serious enough; the last thing the school needs is political candidates rushing in to try to turn the situation into a campaign issue to garner votes.Yet there was Ellen R. Sauerbrey, front-runner for the Republican nomination for governor next year, holding a press conference with her supporters last Wednesday in front of the beleaguered school.Ms. Sauerbrey is right about one thing. If taxes were the political issue that touched the deepest nerves in the last statewide election three years ago, this time education seems to be uppermost on voters' minds.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 6, 2003
City primary change gets preliminary OK from the Senate The Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a measure that would move Baltimore's municipal primary to September of next year and reduce the next term for the mayor and City Council to two years. Under the Senate's plan, the city would hold its local primary and general elections next year and again with the statewide races in 2006. The mayoral elections would then be held every subsequent four years with the state races. Sen. George W. Della Jr. attempted to amend the legislation to give the next mayor and council a six-year term as suggested by a key city leader in the House of Delegates, but the Senate rejected the idea.
NEWS
March 6, 2002
THE INHERENT message behind state school officials' decision to make previously mandatory eighth-grade tests optional is this: The Maryland School Performance Assessment Program's shelf-life is soon to expire. What a message to send students whose teachers have prodded and prepped them all year in anticipation (or dread) of the tests used to judge school quality. And it's some burden to pass on to the local school boards and systems: Each must decide now whether to administer the exams or take a pass.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 18, 1992
County lawmakers are sponsoring legislation that would require the state to pay for 75 percent of the programs it mandates for local schools.Educators across the state, including Anne Arundel County, have protested increasingly that the State Board of Education is imposing costly new requirements, such as mandatory kindergarten, without regard to how local school boards will pay for them."
NEWS
December 27, 2010
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman raised a few eyebrows recently when he said that if the legislature decides to transfer some teacher pension costs to the counties, as a state budget commission recently recommended, the costs should be paid by local school boards rather than out of the county general funds. Mr. Ulman argued that since the school systems have sole authority to hire school personnel, they should be responsible for their pension costs. Despite the fact that this is the very same argument state budget analysts have been making for years in questioning the state's practice of picking up 100 percent of the teacher pension tab, Mr. Ulman was quick to add that he opposes any change to the status quo. But his remark was clearly a nod to the possibility that the present arrangement may not be sustainable.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
Maryland got some very good news Tuesday, when the U.S. Department of Education announced that it was one of 18 states selected as finalists in the federal Race To The Top competition, which will award some $3.4 billion in additional aid to states that demonstrate a serious commitment to school reform. If successful, Maryland could win up to $250 million in grants to advance its reform effort. But it's too early to break out the champagne. Previous experience has shown that though many are called, but few are chosen.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and the state Board of Education, holding separate and unrelated events Tuesday, discussed strikingly similar proposals aimed at encouraging the growth of charter schools in Maryland. Ehrlich, a Republican running to take back the office he lost four years ago to Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, traveled to Montgomery County to unveil a three-point plan for charter schools. "Charters are no longer these strange animals," he said. Making the state rules more friendly to them, he said, "should not be heavy lifting."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Two-thirds of Maryland's 24 local school boards have agreed to sign on to education reforms they hope could earn the state as much as $250 million more in federal aid this year, but teachers unions appear to be far less supportive, which could weaken the state's position. All of the largest school districts in the Baltimore area have voted to sign the Race to the Top application, including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties. But local teachers unions, with the exception of the Baltimore Teachers Union, say they won't be signing or haven't taken a position.
NEWS
By David Borinsky | December 9, 2009
"If I ever forget myself with that girl, I'd like to remember it." That's a Fred Astaire line. Let it sink in, people. It's clever. When it comes to education policy in Maryland, you might say that the General Assembly forgot itself in 2003 when it passed legislation authorizing charter schools and that it's not sure these days how much of that time it would like to remember. But the legislature would do well to jog its memory, and not just because charter schools are doing a good job of educating students in Maryland.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Maryland's Court of Appeals has agreed with the State Board of Education that charter schools are entitled to a much larger sum of money than school boards, particularly Baltimore's Board of School Commissioners, think is fair. The ruling could cost the city school system hundreds of thousands of dollars in compensatory funds. It may also inspire the General Assembly to come up with more realistic funding for charter schools.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Carroll County school board members rejected last night a resolution to support partial voting rights for the panel's student representative. Brendan Schlauch, this year's student representative, has an "opinion vote," which means he is allowed to participate in voting at board meetings, but the vote does not count. The resolution would not have affected Schlauch, whose term ends next month, but he had hoped to secure the right for future representatives. Students at the meeting called the board's 3-2 vote a disappointment, but they said they would persevere.
NEWS
By James W. Campbell | January 26, 2005
AS A RESULT of legislation passed by the General Assembly and signed into law two years ago, local school boards across Maryland will begin the year reviewing proposals from citizens groups to establish charter schools. These advocates will be seeking approval for their contracts - charters - to govern their operations. Ironically, school boards will be asked to transfer their own public dollars to support these independent schools. While all school systems will be affected, the most financially strapped system, Baltimore City, stands to lose the most.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
A pioneering charter school in Anne Arundel County, which had raised reading and math test scores among its once-trailing minority and low-income students, has abandoned its two-year hunt for more space and is closing. The Knowledge is Power Program, or KIPP, Harbor Academy in Edgewater made its decision Wednesday and began notifying parents. "It is with immense sadness that we announce that KIPP Harbor Academy must permanently close its doors this summer," Jallon Brown, KIPP Harbor's founder and school leader, wrote in a letter to parents.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Carroll County school board members rejected last night a resolution to support partial voting rights for the panel's student representative. Brendan Schlauch, this year's student representative, has an "opinion vote," which means he is allowed to participate in voting at board meetings, but the vote does not count. The resolution would not have affected Schlauch, whose term ends next month, but he had hoped to secure the right for future representatives. Students at the meeting called the board's 3-2 vote a disappointment, but they said they would persevere.
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