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By Eric Siegel | December 15, 1991
If a notorious radio personality came on the air in Baltimore and virtually no one tuned in to his show, might he still have an impact on the market?It's a question local radio executives have been asking about New York shock jock Howard Stern, whose morning show began being simulcast here Oct. 1 on WJFK-AM (1300 KHz), formerly WLIF-AM and before that WFBR.It's also a question that begets a couple of others -- namely, what kind of radio market is Baltimore? Or to be more precise, is it too conservative for cutting-edge personalities?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
It was after the Cincinnati game, after Baltimore's Ravens clinched AFC North title, after those mind-blowing runs by Ray Rice, that the three buddies, who'd just about yelled themselves hoarse, went upstairs to hear some music. That's when the purple lightning bolt struck, just as Kenny Silkworth was showing off one of his instrumental tracks, a piece that sounded inspiring to him — motivating, almost, like a battle hymn. Robert "McFreshington" Norton, who raps in town under the name Fresh Competition, heard it and then began to softly chant, "We are, we are, we are the Ravens nation.
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FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2006
Rush Limbaugh, one of the most popular and polarizing radio personalities of recent years, has been sacked in Baltimore. WBAL-AM Radio has canceled Limbaugh's syndicated call-in talk show, saying it wants to focus on local news and hosts. It is the first station to cancel the show, which is heard in nearly 600 markets, according to Limbaugh's syndicate, Premiere Radio Networks. "In this market at this time, we just think we can perform better without him," said Jeff Beauchamp, station manager and vice president at WBAL.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
It may not rank up there with introducing the Beatles, but it's an honor nonetheless.Local radio legend Johnny Dark, whose early-'60s radio program on WCAO helped introduce the British Invasion to Baltimore, will be commended for a lifetime of achievement as part of the second annual Achievement in Radio awards, organized by local radio stations and the March of Dimes.Dark, a native of Cambridge, Mass., had already established himself as a major force in radio by the time he signed with WCAO (600 AM)
SPORTS
By Nestor Aparicio | March 26, 1991
The Skipjacks announced yesterday that tomorrow's game in Utica will be the last broadcast on WLIF-AM 1300, which has been its flagship station all season.The station said yesterday that its programming switch to include a 100 percent simulcast on both its AM and FM stations doesn't allow for Jacks games.The Jacks reached a short-term agreement with WITH-AM 1230 to carry Friday's game at the Arena with Utica and Saturday's game with Capital District in Albany, N.Y. Ken Albert will remain the team's play-by-play man.There is no word on whether Sunday's regular-season finale in Binghamton will be carried on local radio.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1995
The corner of St. Paul and Fayette streets in downtown Baltimore became communications central this month for the WOL Radio Network, which simulcasts weekday talk fare oriented toward black audiences on WOLB-AM (1010) in Baltimore and WOL-AM (1450) in Washington.Previously, daily talk hosts Bernie McCain, Eric St. James, Cathy Hughes and other station voices did their shows from the studios on H Street in Washington. Baltimore listeners wishing to participate in WOLB/WOL programs were routed through phone lines to Washington.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
Tipper Gore, if she had been at the Baltimore City Council meeting last night, would have been proud.The council overwhelmingly backed a bill to put pressure on local radio stations to quash offensive lyrics that demean women and glorify violence. Mrs. Gore, wife of Vice President Al Gore, has led a tireless crusade against explicit song lyrics.The bill, introduced by 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes, calls for a task force to study ways to get radio stations to agree voluntarily not to play songs with suggestive lyrics.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
Radio station WBSB-FM (B-104) will continue to mean music, as its popular slogan puts it, but what kind of music?It's a question local radio executives and advertisers have been asking with increasing frequency in recent days.The Top 40 station, an institution in the Baltimore market for the past decade, has scheduled a breakfast meeting with advertisers Tuesday amid speculation it will be changing to a classic rock or rock-oriented adult-contemporary format.Talk about a possible format change at B-104 -- which has declined dramatically in the ratings in recent years -- has been around for weeks, and invitations tout next week's meeting as the day "the gossip dies" about the station.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1997
AFTER WEEKS of anticipation and preparation, Christmas Day has come and gone. As we awake this morning, the excitement associated with Christmas seems to have faded with presents opened and tried out, families scattered once again, and the holiday feast reduced to leftovers in the refrigerator.Now that the big day is behind us, as are the demands of preparing for it, time remains to enjoy the sights of the holiday season.Jay Henly invites families to stroll through his outdoor light display from 6: 30 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. nightly until New Year's Eve.Located at 206 Frederick Ave., Mount Airy, Henley designed his Christmas light display especially for children in the "spirit of Christmas."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
WBAL radio Monday named Merrie Street as news director replacing Mark Miller, who resigned last month. Street, whose resume includes news director and anchor duties at WLIF and WPOC, starts Monday, according to an email from Ed Kiernan, station general manager. "I have to say I was really impressed with her," Kiernan said in a follow-up telephone interview. "WBAL is one of the premier news organizations in the country," Street said in a telephone interview Monday. "This is just a great opportunity and I look so forward to it. " In addition to her career in radio, Street has also been involved in politics running for such offices as Harford County register of wills.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
Most of us look to our local radio stations as reliable sources for news and music. We tune into them at home, at work, in the car, and pretty much anywhere we go with a radio or device that allows us to stream our favorite stations. As a business owner, I also view local radio stations as an important resource for growth since they offer affordable advertising that helps me reach potential customers. Even though local radio stations are important resources to the communities they serve, the recording industry is pushing for a new tax that would drive some of them out of business and ultimately force others to cut staff and budgets for community-oriented activities such as charity events and disaster relief.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | July 6, 2010
A familiar voice was heard on WJZ-FM 105.7 The Fan on Tuesday morning when longtime sports anchor Steve Davis joined Ed Norris for the inaugural "Norris and Davis Show," which can be heard weekdays from 5 to 9 a.m. Davis, the former sports anchor for Channel 45/WBFF and WBAL radio, provides a knowledgeable sports voice in teaming with Norris, a former Baltimore City police officer who talks politics and all things Baltimore. "I think what people will be able to expect are the things that I've done for 16 years being in Baltimore -- talking sports," Davis said.
NEWS
By From Sun staff reports | March 29, 2010
Starting in April, former Orioles catcher Chris Hoiles will co-host a new afternoon sports talk radio show on Fox Sports 1370 AM. Adam Gladstone, the former director of minor league operations for Ripken Baseball and ex-director of baseball operations for the York Revolution, will join Hoiles in discussion about the Orioles and other baseball news. The show will debut next Monday and will air every weekday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., featuring interviews with baseball executives, phone calls from listeners, live remote broadcasts and behind-the-scenes looks at Orioles baseball.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 5, 2007
For many people, getting away for a holiday means sitting in traffic while listening to radio reports about rubbernecking delays and cascading backups. But during the next few days, as Americans extend their Fourth of July celebrations, tens of thousands of motorists around the country will receive up-to-the minute accident alerts and guidance on end runs around bottlenecks -- without having to turn on a car radio. In the latest incarnation of traffic reporting, information gleaned from cameras, road-top sensors, electronic tollbooths and eyewitnesses is edited in Mission Control-style command rooms and sent out via personalized text or voice messages to subscribers' cell phones or BlackBerrys, often at no charge.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2006
Rush Limbaugh, one of the most popular and polarizing radio personalities of recent years, has been sacked in Baltimore. WBAL-AM Radio has canceled Limbaugh's syndicated call-in talk show, saying it wants to focus on local news and hosts. It is the first station to cancel the show, which is heard in nearly 600 markets, according to Limbaugh's syndicate, Premiere Radio Networks. "In this market at this time, we just think we can perform better without him," said Jeff Beauchamp, station manager and vice president at WBAL.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
More than 22,000 miles from Earth, two satellites named "Rock" and "Roll" are getting ready to rock 'n roll. The two aptly named orbiters are set to begin bathing North America in waves of digital music in the long-anticipated launch of satellite radio. So what makes these different from the 12,000 radio stations that already service the country? Think of it this way: with a satellite radio you can drive from Baltimore to Los Angeles and never be out of range of near-commercial-free tunes that match your tastes.
FEATURES
By Casi H. Clocker and Casi H. Clocker,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
The phone lines at radio station WMIX-FM (106.5) were lit up until midnight Saturday night with callers welcoming the return of local radio institution Johnny Dark.Mr. Dark was back on the air after a seven-month absence as host of " '70s Saturday Night," a new weekly show airing from 7 p.m. to midnight on WMIX."I guess you kind of expect that response for someone who means that much to a city," said WMIX program director Greg Dunkin of the reaction of listeners to the return of Mr. Dark.
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