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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Police in the Baltimore area increased patrols around movie theaters, and local theater owners added security precautions - including banning face masks and fake weapons - after the mass shooting early Friday in suburban Denver sparked fears of copycat attacks. The shooting rampage at a midnight showing of"The Dark Knight Rises"in Aurora, Colo., shattered the perception of safety in yet another public place in a nation that has seen attacks at schools, shopping centers and workplaces.
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NEWS
August 5, 2013
In recent years it has become popular to mock the concept of neighborhood watch. Last summer's Ben Stiller comedy, "The Watch," followed four inept suburban crime watchers as they attempted to save their neighborhood from an alien invasion. The showdown takes place, appropriately enough considering their affluent surroundings, underneath the local Costco. If that wasn't bad enough, George Zimmerman was a local neighborhood watch coordinator and was known to Sanford, Fla. police for his frequent calls reporting suspicious individuals.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
Carroll officials plan to discuss today a proposal between the county and local police agencies that could augment injury and liability coverage for officers who might perform duties outside municipal limits.Officers in five of the county's eight municipalities frequently are asked to help state or area police agencies outside town limits. Under such circumstances, the officers are covered under the state's mutual aid agreement, but some have questioned if that coverage is sufficient.Details of the proposal were not available yesterday.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Why is it that nobody sees anything when someone, man, woman or child, is gunned down on Baltimore's streets? In a city where it is the norm for people to sit on their porches late into the night to escape the heat, the only violence people see are the ones where police are involved ("Witnesses of man's death sought at vigil," July 24). These are the same people who complain about the safety of their streets but thwart any effort to enforce the laws and make lawbreakers into victims.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
If you are an illegal immigrant in Maryland and you call police to report a crime, what happens next is a matter of location. In Howard County, police will not ask how you arrived in the country unless they find that you have broken a law. But if a state trooper shows up at your door and suspects that you are in the United States illegally, you will probably be reported to the federal government. "Any time we come in contact with somebody [and] we're concerned about documentation, we contact the authorities," said Lt. Bud Frank, a Maryland State Police spokesman.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2003
Most Baltimore police officers rely on city maps to help pinpoint crime spikes and deploy the troops to tamp down violence. But Baltimore Police Lt. David Engel has a different kind of map hanging on his office wall -- one of the world. The map reflects the mission assigned to Engel, commander of the city intelligence unit, and his 36 detectives. Working closely with federal agents specializing in national security, the city's intelligence team tracks global flare-ups of terrorist activity, scans the Internet and pumps informants for tips about potential threats.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
— A high-profile meeting of world leaders at Camp David drew only sparse protests Friday despite extensive security preparations by local officials. Frederick County closed public schools Friday and police said they felt obligated to "prepare for the worst," but ultimately only about 50 Occupy movement participants showed at a "People's Summit" held in a library in advance of the Group of Eight industrialized nations meeting. By midday, fewer than half a dozen people picketed sidewalks in nearby Thurmont.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
Spurred by two recent operations against major heroin, cocaine and marijuana networks in Carroll County, state and local police said yesterday that they plan a town meeting to bring together parents, students and community leaders to develop a strategy to stem drug abuse.State police and the Carroll County Chiefs of Police Association will co-sponsor a Forum Against Drug Trafficking (FAST) on Dec. 18 at Westminster High School to address concerns about drugs in the community. The program could serve as a model for community and law enforcement leaders across the state, said 1st. Sgt. Chester Miller, a spokesman for the office of policy and strategy at state police headquarters in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday that his budget proposal for the state police would boost the number of new troopers -- and, in turn, beef up units to fight illegal gun trafficking, computer crime and auto theft.Glendening, who had previously said he would include a 10 percent raise for state troopers in the budget submitted to legislators next month, outlined his priorities for troopers at a swearing-in ceremony for 55 graduates of the agency's training academy. Under his proposal, 75 trooper candidates would enter the academy next month, and another class of 75 would enter in July.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | June 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For five years, the National Rifle Association and its allies have successfully lobbied Congress to limit the ability of local police to access federal gun trace data. Now, by moving to remove those limits and increase the ability of local officers to track so-called crime guns, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is venturing into what is rapidly emerging as the latest battlefield in the war over gun rights. A provision first approved in 2003, when Republicans controlled Congress, sets tight controls on how the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives may share its gun data with local police departments.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Police departments around the country are collecting DNA in largely unregulated databases, The New York Times reported today, providing a broader look at a practice The Baltimore Sun revealed in Maryland earlier this year. The largest collections of DNA records are held at the state and federal levels, but local agencies are also free to collect their own samples and keep their own records, which are not always subject to the same rules. New York City, for example, has a database of 11,000 suspects and Orange County, Calif., has 90,000 records on file, according to the Times . Baltimore police had samples from more than 2,000 suspects and more than 3,000 homicide victims, The Sun reported in February .  The state's DNA law, which allows the collection of DNA from people arrested in connection with serious crimes and was recently upheld by the Supreme Court , makes no reference to the local databases.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland is pushing legislation to close what it describes as loopholes in state law that allow police to keep DNA samples from people never convicted of crimes. Del. Jill P. Carter, a Baltimore Democrat, said Friday she is preparing — with caucus backing — to introduce a bill that would subject all DNA collected by Maryland police to the restrictive standards used for genetic information taken from people charged with violent crimes and burglaries.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Local governments and police on Wednesday attacked a sweeping proposal to change Maryland's speed camera law. During the first hearing on whether to revamp a law that has been lucrative for local governments but also has sparked concerns about fairness, speed camera proponents defended what has been called a "bounty system" of paying contractors based on the number of tickets issued to drivers. Program supporters also rejected as unfeasible a proposal to require precise time-stamped photos and painted lines on roadways that would more easily allow motorists to challenge the $40 tickets in court.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
A man who "managed to break free" from police custody in the parking lot of the Northeast District station near Morgan State University's campus caused university officials to issue multiple alerts to students Tuesday night, according to police. About 7 p.m., a man who had just been arrested on a warrant and was being transported by officers escaped their control in the 1900 block of Argonne Drive and ran off, according to Detective Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman. Officers immediately began searching for the man. Silbert said he did not know the man's name or why the warrant had been issued for his arrest.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
Targeting human trafficking, federal agents participated in a joint operation with local law enforcement that led to the arrest of 23 men alleged to have solicited sex from undercover officers along U.S. 1 in Jessup. The sting brought agents from Homeland Security Investigations, a division of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, together with officers from local and state police departments. While local law enforcement goes after so-called johns to deter prostitution, their value to federal authorities is as a source of information for cases against human traffickers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Police in the Baltimore area increased patrols around movie theaters, and local theater owners added security precautions - including banning face masks and fake weapons - after the mass shooting early Friday in suburban Denver sparked fears of copycat attacks. The shooting rampage at a midnight showing of"The Dark Knight Rises"in Aurora, Colo., shattered the perception of safety in yet another public place in a nation that has seen attacks at schools, shopping centers and workplaces.
NEWS
By Josh Greenberg and Josh Greenberg,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 7, 1995
Along with the standard police equipment such as guns and radios, patrol officers don't leave the Essex Precinct without teddy bears.Thanks to the Sunday Calico Quilters of Essex, a group of women ages 16 to 82, the police have the bears to comfort children they find caught up in traumatic situations."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
Daniel Davis could have been a lawyer or a businessman backed by an Ivy League diploma. Instead, he chose police work.Davis, 53, retired as a lieutenant last month after 26 years with the Howard County police.A quarter-century ago, his choice of careers caused his friends' jaws to drop."A few people have questioned me over the years about my particular career choice after going to Cornell," Davis said. "But I decided to throw my lot with the local police."Colleagues say his work ethic and high expectations resulted in key programs in the department, from a 1970s burglary-prevention project whose major initiatives are still in force today to the Auxiliary Police Force begun in 1995.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Howard Community College was evacuated Thursday morning after someone called in a bomb threat to local police. Howard County police officials said they ordered all students out of the Columbia school before 10 a.m., after receiving a call stating there was a bomb on the college's property. After searching the school, police ruled the threat a hoax and allowed students to return to class before 11 a.m., officials said. Mike Scrivener, a college spokesman, said the buildings were evacuated for about 40 minutes and the disruption was minimal.
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