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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 21, 2004
Fewer than one in five Anne Arundel County residents support an increase in the local income tax, according to an Anne Arundel Community College poll released Friday. Between March 8 and 11, the 384 county residents surveyed were asked which best described their general feelings about raising the income tax. 17 percent supported the increase because without it the quality of important services could diminish. 17 percent said that while services might diminish, they either can't afford or don't want more taxes.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
When Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman unveiled her proposed $1.35 billion county budget on Thursday, she described it as a package that reduced the county's property tax rate "without cutting essential services or depleting our savings. " But in a political year that has already seen sharp barbs between Neuman and her opponent for the Republican nomination for county executive, Del. Steve Schuh, the tax rate issue immediately drew a rebuke from Schuh, who called the cut "inadequate and misleading.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | February 3, 1991
The last time Maryland set out to make its tax system fairer, it created the "piggyback" tax -- the local income tax of up to 2.5 percent.This time around, tax reformers point to the piggyback tax as one of their biggest problems.While the tax was part of a 1967 plan intended to help equalize revenues among jurisdictions, critics say it now is the single greatest source of disparity in what local governments have to spend. It benefits high-income counties such as Montgomery, but it leaves Baltimore, with far more poor people and far fewer middle-income and upper-income residents, lagging behind.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
In his recent opinion piece on taxing the rich, Brian Murphy packs in just about every Republican tax myth and deception as humanly possible ("Warren Buffett is wrong," Aug. 24). Somehow, in talking about Mr. Buffet's proposal to raise federal taxes on the super-wealthy, he shifts the conversation to state taxes and the Internet sales tax. This is a common Republican tactic to convince middle and lower income groups that a tax on the super-wealthy is really a tax on them. In other words, lead the discussion in a direction that will scare them.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2000
Think you're paying less to the government than you did before the state cut income taxes? Think again. While Marylanders are paying less in state income taxes, about half will turn over more to local governments when they file their returns this spring because the General Assembly wanted to simplify the way people figure their taxes. The change means that as seniors, singles and couples with no children calculate their taxes for 1999, they will pay more local income tax than they did for 1998.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | December 4, 1992
A Baltimore taxpayer group warned City Council members yesterday that approval of a proposed local income tax increase would turn the city into a ghost town.But Police Commissioner Edward V. Woods and Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. offered bleak assessments of public safety in the city without the additional revenue from the tax increase proposed by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke for increased police and fire protection."Are we going to become a city of ghosts?" asked Daniel J. Loden, president of the Baltimore City Homeowners Coalition for Fair Property Taxes, a group that opposes increasing the so-called "piggyback tax."
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | April 20, 1992
Anne Arundel schoolchildren have emerged from this winter's state budget crisis richer, not poorer, than had been expected.Their parents are also better off than they would have been if County ExecutiveRobert R. Neall had decided to raise the local income tax rate.During the General Assembly session, Neall encouraged state lawmakers to give local governments authority to raise the "piggyback" taxrate from 50 to 60 percent of the state income tax rate. But he sayshis fiscal 1993 budget, to be presented May 1, will not include the increase.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it," goes the conventional country wisdom. But heaven forbid if it is broke and you have to call in the Maryland General Assembly. Then you might get something that resembles the revised state sales tax code.The first two phases of the tax changes went into effect May 1 and June 1. They covered consumer items ranging from newspapers to cigarettes, gasoline to snack foods. They also came with a rash of contradictions. A single ice cream treat, for example, is now subject to the 5 percent sales tax. A dozen ice creams aren't.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Phillip McGowan and Ruma Kumar and Phillip McGowan,[Sun Reporters] | January 14, 2007
Anne Arundel County school officials -- hoping for a $131 million boost in school funding -- are pressing the county executive and County Council to raise a local income tax that hasn't been touched since Lyndon B. Johnson was president. Undaunted by the long shot, schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell is pushing for the tax increase because it could generate $80 million for the cash-strapped school system and county. Maxwell said last week that he hopes the council will consider raising the county's local income tax rate from 2.5 to 3.2 percent, the legal limit.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
In his recent opinion piece on taxing the rich, Brian Murphy packs in just about every Republican tax myth and deception as humanly possible ("Warren Buffett is wrong," Aug. 24). Somehow, in talking about Mr. Buffet's proposal to raise federal taxes on the super-wealthy, he shifts the conversation to state taxes and the Internet sales tax. This is a common Republican tactic to convince middle and lower income groups that a tax on the super-wealthy is really a tax on them. In other words, lead the discussion in a direction that will scare them.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Three more Republicans are closer to becoming Republican candidates for Howard County executive or the County Council, they said, while party regulars continue to promote the GOP's chances for a big comeback in 2010. Trent Kittleman, a former Ehrlich administration transportation official and member of a prominent county Republican family, said she's increasingly convinced she can run a good race against Democratic incumbent Ken Ulman. "The longer I am out there talking to people, the more positive I am," Kittleman said.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 19, 2007
State leaders are considering the first changes to Maryland's income tax brackets in 40 years to make them more progressive - and to help erase the state's projected $1.5 billion budget shortfall. The tax is essentially flat - the highest bracket kicks in at $3,000 in income - and the top rate of 4.75 percent is the seventh-lowest in the country. Gov. Martin O'Malley said this week that he wants to find ways to make the state's tax structure more progressive, and key legislators, including Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, have expressed support for at least a temporary tax increase on top earners, such as one that helped Maryland weather its last major fiscal crisis, in the early 1990s.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Phillip McGowan and Ruma Kumar and Phillip McGowan,[Sun Reporters] | January 14, 2007
Anne Arundel County school officials -- hoping for a $131 million boost in school funding -- are pressing the county executive and County Council to raise a local income tax that hasn't been touched since Lyndon B. Johnson was president. Undaunted by the long shot, schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell is pushing for the tax increase because it could generate $80 million for the cash-strapped school system and county. Maxwell said last week that he hopes the council will consider raising the county's local income tax rate from 2.5 to 3.2 percent, the legal limit.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley revealed yesterday several tax and fee increases he is considering to fill a projected $40 million hole in the budget for the fiscal year starting July 1, including a possible increase in the local income tax rate. "No one is going to be happy about higher taxes," O'Malley said during a City Hall news conference. "But we just can't cut any more, because we've been cutting and cutting and cutting over the years." O'Malley blamed the city's fiscal troubles in part on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s budget, which O'Malley said was paying for the Thornton Commission plan to increase education funding by cutting other local aid, including state grants for parks and police.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 21, 2004
Fewer than one in five Anne Arundel County residents support an increase in the local income tax, according to an Anne Arundel Community College poll released Friday. Between March 8 and 11, the 384 county residents surveyed were asked which best described their general feelings about raising the income tax. 17 percent supported the increase because without it the quality of important services could diminish. 17 percent said that while services might diminish, they either can't afford or don't want more taxes.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
County Executive Janet S. Owens says she wants to increase the county income tax rate by nearly a fifth, setting up a head-on collision in the spring with the County Council. "At this point, due to things beyond our control, we need the revenue," Owens said yesterday. The increase would raise the county income tax rate to 3 percent from 2.56 percent. A household earning the median county income - about $62,000 - would pay nearly $275 more in income tax for the fiscal year that begins July 1. The increase would raise an additional $48 million for the county, officials said.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 19, 2007
State leaders are considering the first changes to Maryland's income tax brackets in 40 years to make them more progressive - and to help erase the state's projected $1.5 billion budget shortfall. The tax is essentially flat - the highest bracket kicks in at $3,000 in income - and the top rate of 4.75 percent is the seventh-lowest in the country. Gov. Martin O'Malley said this week that he wants to find ways to make the state's tax structure more progressive, and key legislators, including Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, have expressed support for at least a temporary tax increase on top earners, such as one that helped Maryland weather its last major fiscal crisis, in the early 1990s.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
The governor giveth and he taketh away. The catch is, the Carroll commissioners don't want any part of the giveth side of the equation.Under the fiscal 1993 state budget proposed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer Thursday, scheduled increases in aid to Carroll would be reduced by $6.4 million for the year beginning July 1. The current county budget is about $112 million.The catch is that the county could make up for all of that lost revenue if the General Assembly enacts legislation enabling counties to raise local income tax rates and the commissioners use that authority.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposed budget gives Howard County more money, his administration says, but local officials paint a much different picture. In a complex series of moves worthy of a long game of Celebrity Poker, Ehrlich's budget would cut $2.5 million from Howard's highway maintenance fund, $1 million from Program Open Space and $1.2 million from three education categories, according to a chart from the state Department of Legislative Services. But a one-time accounting move would give the county $4.9 million more in unclaimed income tax revenue, which would wipe out the losses - except for one thing.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2000
Think you're paying less to the government than you did before the state cut income taxes? Think again. While Marylanders are paying less in state income taxes, about half will turn over more to local governments when they file their returns this spring because the General Assembly wanted to simplify the way people figure their taxes. The change means that as seniors, singles and couples with no children calculate their taxes for 1999, they will pay more local income tax than they did for 1998.
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