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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | May 6, 1992
County residents will have to wait a little longer to find out whether they will be paying more in local income taxes this year.The County Council voted along party lines Monday to make June 1 the day it decides the piggyback tax issue. If levied, the tax, a percentage of state income taxes collected for local use, would rise from 50 percent to 52 percent and be retroactive to Jan. 1.Council members say that, by law, June 1 is the only day piggyback taxes can be raised. In reality, the council will have decided the issue by May 21. That's when the council adopts the county budget and approves the property tax rate for fiscal 1993.
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NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
County Executive Janet S. Owens says she wants to increase the county income tax rate by nearly a fifth, setting up a head-on collision in the spring with the County Council. "At this point, due to things beyond our control, we need the revenue," Owens said yesterday. The increase would raise the county income tax rate to 3 percent from 2.56 percent. A household earning the median county income - about $62,000 - would pay nearly $275 more in income tax for the fiscal year that begins July 1. The increase would raise an additional $48 million for the county, officials said.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
In an age of conservative Republican tax and budget cutting, Howard County's liberal Democrats have struck back - approving a hefty income tax increase to fuel a 9.35 percent rise in spending next budget year on a series of 3-2 party line votes, leaving local Republicans dispirited and frustrated. County Executive James N. Robey's income tax boost moves Howard from Maryland's third-lowest rate (2.45 percent) to the legal limit (3.20 percent) to provide money for a 4 percent pay raise for county workers, 311 new school employees and to pay higher fixed costs such as insurance - pending further state cuts.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Howard County Republicans are so outraged by the large increase in local income taxes enacted by County Executive James N. Robey and the majority Democrats, they are advertising it in large, black print. But the party's concern with what it terms "OUT OF CONTROL SPENDING!" in the ads, which have run in The Sun and several Howard County weeklies, ignores the spending decisions of a Republican president and GOP-controlled Congress. Those decisions are predicted to produce a $477 billion deficit this year, rising to $521 billion next year in President Bush's proposed budget, which calls for making federal income tax cuts permanent.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
Maryland officials expect to recover about $9 million by intercepting the federal tax rebates of people who owe state or local income taxes. "Our hope is that we'll collect $9 million," said David F. Roose, revenue estimator for the Maryland Comptroller's Office. "It's not going to solve all the budgetary problems of the state, but it is money that people owe. It's part of our efforts to insure that everyone pays their fair share." The state also will take the tax rebates of residents who owe back child support.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1996
Maybe Money magazine listened.For years, Maryland officials have complained loudly each time Money classified the state as one of the country's worst "tax hells." The magazine's study was flawed, officials argued, because it counted local income taxes in Maryland, but not for many other states in which they were levied. This year Money changed its tune. Instead of ranking states by taxation, it ranked the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas. Because local income taxes were counted wherever they applied, what critics said was the magazine's bias against Maryland presumably has disappeared.
NEWS
April 6, 1994
MONEY magazine was wrong!!! And it's time for this Time Warner publication to admit it.That's the way Maryland Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein feels. He has presented persuasive evidence that the magazine acted more like a scandal sheet than a responsible, fact-checking financial publication when it lumped Maryland in with other "tax hell" states.In its January issue, Money listed Maryland as the third worst state in terms of its tax burden. But Mr. Goldstein found that Money had goofed -- badly.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
You may find a little surprise in your first paycheck next month. Take-home pay will be a bit smaller for some Maryland residents, thanks to income tax changes that kick in July 1.Baltimore County residents will be paying higher local income taxes, as will people living in Allegany, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties.And certain Marylanders with six-figure salaries, regardless of where they live, will start paying higher state income taxes.The General Assembly approved the income tax changes in April to help replenish state and local government budgets zapped by the recession and declining revenues.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
You may find a little surprise in your first paycheck next month. Take-home pay will be a bit smaller for some Maryland residents, thanks to income tax changes that kick in July 1.Baltimore County residents will be paying higher local income taxes, as will people living in Allegany, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties.And certain Marylanders with six-figure salaries, regardless of where they live, will start paying higher state income taxes.The General Assembly approved the income tax changes in April to help replenish state and local government budgets zapped by the recession and declining revenues.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
Many Marylanders still have trouble understanding the state's piggyback income tax system, so it may come as no shock that the federal government is having some trouble grasping it as well.The problem is that no one seems to have informed a key federal payroll center that the Maryland General Assembly's authorization for local jurisdictions to increase the piggyback-tax rate to a maximum of 60 percent was optional.Only five of Maryland's 24 political subdivisions have imposed higher local income taxes by raising the rate -- the "piggyback" percentage that is added on to the state income tax, collected by the state comptroller's office and forwarded to Baltimore and the 23 counties.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
If the weather outside had been frightful, Howard County Executive James N. Robey said last night, he would have understood why so few people attended his annual public hearing on the county budget in Ellicott City. "I would suspect from the significant number of empty seats, it was sleeting or snowing outside, but it's not," he told a sparse crowd of fewer than 100 people -- the vast majority of them veteran advocates for the public schools, fast-growing Howard Community College and the county's popular library system.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
In an age of conservative Republican tax and budget cutting, Howard County's liberal Democrats have struck back - approving a hefty income tax increase to fuel a 9.35 percent rise in spending next budget year on a series of 3-2 party line votes, leaving local Republicans dispirited and frustrated. County Executive James N. Robey's income tax boost moves Howard from Maryland's third-lowest rate (2.45 percent) to the legal limit (3.20 percent) to provide money for a 4 percent pay raise for county workers, 311 new school employees and to pay higher fixed costs such as insurance - pending further state cuts.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2003
A Republican attempt to rally anti-tax sentiment in Howard County with newspaper ads targeting the Democratic County Council chairman backfired last night, when the ads drew many more supporters of a big income tax increase than opponents to a council hearing in Ellicott City. Several speakers, including one councilman, denounced the ads. They showed a black line drawn diagonally across the face of Chairman Guy Guzzone, on an octagonal stop-sign-styled background, and the words urging, "Stop councilman Guy Guzzone from raising our taxes again."
NEWS
May 11, 2003
Hurting those who can least afford it Larry Carson reported in his article "Council frees New Colony from its real estate limbo" (May 6) that I was the sole witness at a council hearing on the county's property tax and that I spoke mainly on the issue of the proposed increase of the county income tax. Mr. Carson also deemed it necessary to include my party affiliation and activities in the article, even though it was not discussed during my testimony, thereby...
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Anne Arundel County's operating budget might be $10 million short this year, a situation caused, in part, by drooping sales taxes and building fees, the county's top budget official reported yesterday. Budget Officer John R. Hammond told the County Council at a work session yesterday that the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as well as Monday's passenger jet crash in New York have consumers feeling nervous. "The economy will turn around, but when, I don't know," Hammond said. It was the first time that the elected body met with Hammond and John M. Brusnighan, the county's new chief administrative officer, to discuss budget concerns, which Brusnighan tried to calm.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
Maryland officials expect to recover about $9 million by intercepting the federal tax rebates of people who owe state or local income taxes. "Our hope is that we'll collect $9 million," said David F. Roose, revenue estimator for the Maryland Comptroller's Office. "It's not going to solve all the budgetary problems of the state, but it is money that people owe. It's part of our efforts to insure that everyone pays their fair share." The state also will take the tax rebates of residents who owe back child support.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter | December 11, 1990
There's little you can do after the end of the year to adjust your taxes. The door locks shut Dec. 31. This means you have only a few days left to estimate your 1990 tax bill and to determine whether there are any moves you can make now to save in April.Begin with basic tax estimates and determinations:* Make a rough estimate of your income and deductions for this year and for 1991.* Based on the taxable income estimates, determine your tax bracket for both years.* Decide if you should accelerate income into 1990 -- or if you should delay such income and the tax."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer Staff writer Sherry Joe contributed to this story | August 26, 1992
County Executive Charles I. Ecker knows Howard County will not escape Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget ax, but he hopes to dull the blade a little."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1998
The County Commissioners gave the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce a preview yesterday of the way they plan to campaign for re-election this year.They told a luncheon crowd of 135 that they have solved the county's 13-year-old trash problem, slowed residential growth, preserved farmland, increased economic development and funded needed schools.Only Commissioner Donald I. Dell mentioned in the annual tri-part State of the County address that the achievements came about largely because of tax increases voted by him and Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1996
Maybe Money magazine listened.For years, Maryland officials have complained loudly each time Money classified the state as one of the country's worst "tax hells." The magazine's study was flawed, officials argued, because it counted local income taxes in Maryland, but not for many other states in which they were levied. This year Money changed its tune. Instead of ranking states by taxation, it ranked the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas. Because local income taxes were counted wherever they applied, what critics said was the magazine's bias against Maryland presumably has disappeared.
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