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NEWS
February 15, 1997
LESS THAN A year after the opening of its magnificent, restored cast-iron exhibit building, the Baltimore City Life Museums is in deep trouble.The institution never finished an $11.5 million capital campaign and owes a bank $2.5 million on the new building. Worse yet, the museum faces a new fiscal year without having secured a funding source for about half of its $2 million operating budget.City Life's predicament is a classic case of over-expansion with inadequate funds.The crisis could not come at a worse time.
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
When people are long dead, they need a good storyteller to bring them back to life. On Friday and Saturday nights in this ghostly season, seven guides roam the streets of historic Ellicott City, sharing tales of unexplained noises, unnatural visitors and unusual visions along with a healthy dose of history from the area once called Ellicott Mills. "Every story has a source," said guide Marty Schoppert, as he set out Saturday night with a group of visitors on the "Ghosts of Ellicott Mills" tour, sponsored by the Ellicott City Tourism Council.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Engelina van Opstal remembers having a problem with the air conditioning in her apartment at Charlestown Retirement Community and calling for someone to come repair it. "John came," van Opstal recalled Thursday, "and he got it working. " That would be John C. Erickson, who 30 years ago opened Charlestown on the grounds of a former seminary in Catonsville, the first of what would become a chain of 16 retirement communities in nine states. Erickson, who sold the company in 2010, returned Thursday for what he called "a big homecoming" to help residents and staff celebrate Charlestown's 30th anniversary.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
When people are long dead, they need a good storyteller to bring them back to life. On Friday and Saturday nights in this ghostly season, seven guides roam the streets of historic Ellicott City, sharing tales of unexplained noises, un natural visitors and unusual visions along with a healthy dose of history from the area once called Ellicott Mills. "Every story has a source." said guide Marty Schoppert , as he set out Saturday night with a group of visitors on the "Ghosts of Ellicott Mills" tour, sponsored by the Ellicott City Tourism Council.
NEWS
September 18, 1991
The Arundel Senior Assistance Programs Inc. of Edgewater have been awarded a Certificate of Commendation by the American Association for State and Local History for the project, "The Annapolis I Remember."This award is one of the most prestigious for local history achievement. It recognizes people and institutions that have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of state and local history.Nominations start at the local level, and are screened at the state and regional levels by a national network of judges.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
The knowledge and appreciation of local history is a glue that keeps communities together and mindful of the perspective of their development. For that reason, it is heartening that so many good picture books have appeared on local history in various parts of Maryland in recent years.The latest news on this front is the release by the Annapolis Publishing Co. of Philip L. Brown's "The Other Annapolis." The handsome volume charts the life of the state capital's African-American community from 1900 to 1950.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Tabernacle Church in northeastern Harford County began as a 24-foot- by-24-foot log building constructed on land donated by Theodore and Sarah McLaughlin on Sept. 1, 1856. Roofed in local slate and heated by an iron stove, the building served as a stopping place for the circuit-riding minister of the Evangelical Church. Improvements such as interior plaster and exterior siding extended the original building's usefulness. Despite a split among the congregation during the Civil War, the membership continued to grow.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
The Maryland Historical Society's Bicentennial Gala Seems to me to have forgotten a few people ("Maryland Historical Society's War of 1812 Bicentennial Gala: Scene & Heard," June 17). Were any of the descendants of the original defenders asked to join? Or were they just not mentioned in the article? Was it just the muckity-mucks with money who attended? I realize space may have been too limited on Page 4 to have included more uniformed men such as Gov.Martin O'MalleyandPeter O'Malley, as well as Michael Enright.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
Joetta M. Cramm has turned her interest in Howard County history into a cottage industry."I never intended for it to happen, but there's a market," said Ms. Cramm, 63, an Ellicott City resident and former County Council legislative assistant who retired in 1989 to dedicate herself to her "hobby."Ms. Cramm now is widely considered the county's unofficial historian.She has contracts with Howard Community College to teach history courses and with the county's Recreation and Parks Department to conduct bus and walking tours.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
John D. Danko stops in mid-conversation to note the sound ringing through the house. The small brass bell chimes from behind the face of the grandfather clock in the foyer, perhaps the same sound people would have heard in their homes while waiting for word from the battlegrounds of the War of 1812. "Back in those days, this is what they heard," says Danko, after the clock has chimed nine times on the hour. Then there's only the tick-tick-tick of the seconds as two weights and a pendulum wrought in cast iron keep the time using technology that dates to the days of the Battle of North Point and Fort McHenry's defense of Baltimore harbor.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | July 29, 2012
Sykesville's Gate House Museum of History has always highlighted the community past, but these days visitors entering the small museum can almost feel a sense of renewal and vitality as well. The atmosphere is almost as if someone came along and — at least figuratively — cleared away the dust, clutter and cobwebs. Visitors are greeted by a new display called "Making Tracks: A Chronological History of Sykesville," which includes pictures and spiffy graphics and takes up an entire wall.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
The Maryland Historical Society's Bicentennial Gala Seems to me to have forgotten a few people ("Maryland Historical Society's War of 1812 Bicentennial Gala: Scene & Heard," June 17). Were any of the descendants of the original defenders asked to join? Or were they just not mentioned in the article? Was it just the muckity-mucks with money who attended? I realize space may have been too limited on Page 4 to have included more uniformed men such as Gov.Martin O'MalleyandPeter O'Malley, as well as Michael Enright.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | May 5, 2012
The Taneytown History Museum is featuring two small, but vivid, exhibits that focus on very different aspects of north Carroll County history: Its brush with the Civil War, and its 200-year heritage of dairy farming. The exhibit "Got Milk: A Brief History of Carroll County Dairy Farming, 1800-1930" takes up only one room in the museum on East Baltimore Street, yet offers a glimpse into dairy farming's economic and cultural importance in Carroll during earlier times. The displays are comprised of an eclectic assortment of photographs, paintings and articles describing several diary industry tools that were invented in Carroll County and marketed nationally.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
We are nearing the 14th anniversary of the closing of the Peale Museum, when Baltimore became one of the few historic cities in the world without its own history center. Also lost to the public - although carefully preserved by the Maryland Historical Society - was the entire treasury of local history formerly displayed and accessible at the Peale, which was rightly regarded as "Baltimore's Smithsonian. " The good news is that MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakerecently announced that her administration intends to give greater recognition to Baltimore history as a critical element of its economic development and cultural enrichment strategy.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
When is hard candy more than just something to eat? Perhaps when you make it from 15 pounds of raw materials, stir in blue and green food coloring, add miniature "waves" as the mass hardens, and let the giant aquatic-looking entity surround the tiny lighthouse you've already crafted from other edible objects. "The Thomas Point Lighthouse," the scenic-but-sugary creation of Don and Marlena Dillenbeck of Hanover, is a contender this year in a gingerbread house competition sponsored by the Historic Annapolis Foundation, a contest in which creativity, technical skill and awareness of local history are as important as ingredients to a recipe.
NEWS
March 28, 1997
FEW MARYLAND COUNTIES can compete with Anne Arundel for the richness of local history: Some of this country's earliest European settlers walked along the Chesapeake and its tributaries on lands which up to that point had been the hunting grounds of native Americans. Later, notables from George Washington to Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson used the local ferries on their travels from the nation's capital to New York and points north.George W. "Bill" Schriefer, 73, obviously did not witness those events.
NEWS
February 24, 1997
APPRECIATION OF local history is vital in giving a place its distinctive identity. In this respect, Annapolis is fortunate. Not only does Maryland's state capital boast a rich past that has been well documented since Colonial times, but the city is a horn of plenty of landmark buildings, relics and memorabilia.The preservation of Annapolis was not predestined. Even though preservation was often on citizens' minds, it was largely an on-again, off-again proposition. It is truly a miracle that the downtown district is so intact because most successful preservation efforts did not start until after World War II.Therein lies a story.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 25, 2011
Digging into the past can be an intriguing and enlightening experience. But when it involves slogging for hours through shin-deep mud and frigid water on a chilly November morning, it might tend to dampen the intrigue and stifle the enlightenment a little bit. Not so for a dozen or so students from New Windsor Middle School who, on a recent Saturday morning, participated in an ongoing archaeological dig at one of New Windsor's landmarks, its...
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | October 20, 2011
Local history, whether it resides in family letters or in the names and dates on weather-scarred tombstones in an abandoned cemetery, only survives if someone, somewhere along the line, takes the initiative to preserve it. So it is with Old Trinity Cemetery, one of the oldest remaining burial grounds in Carroll County, which, ironically, is located almost within a stone's throw of Eldersburg's busiest intersection, Route 32 and Liberty Road....
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