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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
The Maryland medical society is asking doctors to donate preventive health care to the public to help patch gaps created by state budget cuts.Leaders of the Medical and Chirurgical Society of Maryland said yesterday that they have no illusions that doctors volunteering time will compensate fully for a $20 million reduction in state aid to local health departments.But they said each immunization given or AIDS patient counseled will benefit a patient who otherwise would be turned away.Dr. Joseph Fastow, chairman of Med-Chi's governing council, was optimistic that doctors would rally to the call, although he declined to predict how many of the society's 7,000 members might respond.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
The first laboratory-confirmed case of seasonal flu was reported Friday by state health officials, who are using the milestone to remind residents to get vaccinated for the virus. The case involves an adult in the Baltimore region, and comes two months later than the first case reported last season. The flu is spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing or contact with an infected person. Symptoms usually begin a few days later and include fever, body aches, fatigue, coughing and sore throat.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
About 98,400 doses of the batch of swine flu vaccine recalled this week by its Gaithersburg-based maker had been distributed in Maryland, but nearly all were likely used while still at full potency, state officials said. The recall of 4.7 million doses of FluMist nationwide was announced Tuesday by maker MedImmune after tests showed that the doses, if not used, could be losing strength. Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Wednesday that the state's allotment went to 142 providers here, including doctors, hospitals, clinics and all local health departments.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
Maryland's infant mortality rate dropped to its lowest point in 2009, according to preliminary statistics, but state public health officials say there is still need for improvement. The overall rate decreased to 7.2 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in Maryland last year, down from 8 in 2008 — a 10 percent decrease. The teen birth rate also decreased, from 2.8 births to women under 18 to 2.6, with declines recorded for black and white women. "We are so pleased this is showing positive progress," said Frances Phillips, Maryland's deputy secretary for public health.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Many local health departments across the nation say they will have to curtail an array of services, including cancer and tuberculosis screening and children's dental examinations, to meet the needs of President Bush's federal smallpox vaccination program. In interviews, health officials from New York to Seattle said much of the $940 million that Congress allocated to the Department of Health and Human Services last May for bioterrorism preparedness had been spent for steps to respond to the anthrax threats of 2001.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
About 98,400 doses of the batch of swine flu vaccine recalled this week by its Gaithersburg-based maker had been distributed in Maryland, but nearly all were likely used while still at full potency, state officials said. The recall of 4.7 million doses of FluMist nationwide was announced Tuesday by maker MedImmune after tests showed that the doses, if not used, could be losing strength. Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Wednesday that the state's allotment went to 142 providers here, including doctors, hospitals, clinics and all local health departments.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 7, 2010
Local health officials from across Maryland say this year's state budget will lock in crippling cuts that will weaken food inspections, pregnancy clinics, chronic disease prevention and other services provided by front-line workers. "We're very concerned about the viability of local health departments," said Dr. Barbara Brookmyer, president of the Maryland Association of County Health Officers and a Frederick County employee. The spending plan that lawmakers are poised to adopt this week contains $37 million in state funds for local health departments - about the same amount they received in 1997.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
The first laboratory-confirmed case of seasonal flu was reported Friday by state health officials, who are using the milestone to remind residents to get vaccinated for the virus. The case involves an adult in the Baltimore region, and comes two months later than the first case reported last season. The flu is spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing or contact with an infected person. Symptoms usually begin a few days later and include fever, body aches, fatigue, coughing and sore throat.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
Howard County's health officer will head a new state health agency expected to play an important role in preparing the state to defend against bioterrorism and in responding to any new bioterrorism scare or incident. Dr. Diane L. Matuszak, a 19-year veteran of public health service and Howard's health officer since May 1999, will leave Dec. 26 to become director of the Maryland Community Health Administration. The 4-month-old agency has an annual budget of $79 million and supervises the 24 local health departments in the state.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2004
State health officials said yesterday they plan to redistribute flu vaccine from local health departments that have some in hand to the seven jurisdictions with none - though even that step will leave Maryland agencies some 60,000 doses short. About 10 percent of flu vaccinations are provided through state and local health departments, to immunize everyone from healthy soccer moms to senior citizens with chronic health conditions. The state had expected to receive 113,000 doses of the vaccine for the current flu season but will have to make do with less than half that amount.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 7, 2010
Local health officials from across Maryland say this year's state budget will lock in crippling cuts that will weaken food inspections, pregnancy clinics, chronic disease prevention and other services provided by front-line workers. "We're very concerned about the viability of local health departments," said Dr. Barbara Brookmyer, president of the Maryland Association of County Health Officers and a Frederick County employee. The spending plan that lawmakers are poised to adopt this week contains $37 million in state funds for local health departments - about the same amount they received in 1997.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
About 98,400 doses of the batch of swine flu vaccine recalled this week by its Gaithersburg-based maker had been distributed in Maryland, but nearly all were likely used while still at full potency, state officials said. The recall of 4.7 million doses of FluMist nationwide was announced Tuesday by maker MedImmune after tests showed that the doses, if not used, could be losing strength. Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Wednesday that the state's allotment went to 142 providers here, including doctors, hospitals, clinics and all local health departments.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
About 98,400 doses of the batch of swine flu vaccine recalled this week by its Gaithersburg-based maker had been distributed in Maryland, but nearly all were likely used while still at full potency, state officials said. The recall of 4.7 million doses of FluMist nationwide was announced Tuesday by maker MedImmune after tests showed that the doses, if not used, could be losing strength. Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Wednesday that the state's allotment went to 142 providers here, including doctors, hospitals, clinics and all local health departments.
NEWS
By Anne S. Kasper and Leni Preston | November 6, 2009
After ducking the nation's health care crisis for many years, Congress finally stands on the verge of passing comprehensive health reform. Each of several bills on the table would build on our existing public-private system to bring us much closer to making comprehensive, high-quality health care available to all Americans. Maryland is the wealthiest state in the nation. Yet almost one in five residents is uninsured or underinsured, and many more are just one medical bill from bankruptcy or foreclosure.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2004
State health officials said yesterday they plan to redistribute flu vaccine from local health departments that have some in hand to the seven jurisdictions with none - though even that step will leave Maryland agencies some 60,000 doses short. About 10 percent of flu vaccinations are provided through state and local health departments, to immunize everyone from healthy soccer moms to senior citizens with chronic health conditions. The state had expected to receive 113,000 doses of the vaccine for the current flu season but will have to make do with less than half that amount.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Many local health departments across the nation say they will have to curtail an array of services, including cancer and tuberculosis screening and children's dental examinations, to meet the needs of President Bush's federal smallpox vaccination program. In interviews, health officials from New York to Seattle said much of the $940 million that Congress allocated to the Department of Health and Human Services last May for bioterrorism preparedness had been spent for steps to respond to the anthrax threats of 2001.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton will soon propose a $25 million initiative to combat the spread of infectious diseases, including virulent new strains of microbes that resist treatment by antibiotics and other drugs, administration officials said yesterday.Public health officials have become alarmed about the emergence of such "superbugs" and more generally about the increasing incidence of infectious diseases once thought to be under control.The extra money will be included in the budget request that Clinton sends to Congress early next year, administration officials said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs and Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
Despite delays and price gouging in the distribution of flu vaccines this fall, Maryland health officials said yesterday that they now have enough for all state residents and urged everyone to get the shots. The extra supply came just in time for the flu season. Yesterday, the state reported the season's first confirmed cases of the virus in a 10-year-old Baltimore girl and a 59-year-old Prince George's County woman, both of whom are in good condition. "People who may have been discouraged from getting their flu vaccinations earlier this season because of distribution problems, we are now encouraging them to come in and get their shots," Dr. Georges Benjamin, the state's health secretary, said at a news conference.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs and Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
Despite delays and price gouging in the distribution of flu vaccines this fall, Maryland health officials said yesterday that they now have enough for all state residents and urged everyone to get the shots. The extra supply came just in time for the flu season. Yesterday, the state reported the season's first confirmed cases of the virus in a 10-year-old Baltimore girl and a 59-year-old Prince George's County woman, both of whom are in good condition. "People who may have been discouraged from getting their flu vaccinations earlier this season because of distribution problems, we are now encouraging them to come in and get their shots," Dr. Georges Benjamin, the state's health secretary, said at a news conference.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
Howard County's health officer will head a new state health agency expected to play an important role in preparing the state to defend against bioterrorism and in responding to any new bioterrorism scare or incident. Dr. Diane L. Matuszak, a 19-year veteran of public health service and Howard's health officer since May 1999, will leave Dec. 26 to become director of the Maryland Community Health Administration. The 4-month-old agency has an annual budget of $79 million and supervises the 24 local health departments in the state.
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