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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2010
Baltimore's revitalized waterfront draws millions of visitors a year, but could it ever be a place where people actually take a dip? Or catch fish? That's the vision of a local group that wants to make Baltimore's harbor swimmable and fishable within a decade. The Waterfront Partnership, a nonprofit group funded by a tax surcharge on commercial properties along the harbor, plans to unveil its proposal this week for "floating wetlands" that filter and oxygenate polluted water and other projects from installing urns for cigarette butts to adding trees and native plants.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 15, 2009
The annual solicitation letter from Santa Claus Anonymous arrived in the mail the other day, with its trademark depiction of a classic Santa with his hat pulled over his eyes. The iconic drawing, of course, suggests a fundamental tenet of the 75-year-old organization – poor children who receive holiday gifts never need know they came from charity. Nor do donors need know the names of the children who benefit from their contributions; they merely trust that Santa Claus Anonymous delivers as promised.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | February 26, 2009
Walter Leroy "Lee" Gordon, the lead singer with the Bleu Lights, died of heart disease Feb. 18 at Sinai Hospital. The West Baltimore resident, who was also a retired auto technician, was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lauretta Avenue, he attended Frederick Douglass High School. He joined the Air Force and was stationed in French Morocco in the 1950s. Over the years, Mr. Gordon worked for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., Maryland Drydock & Shipbuilding Co., Bethlehem Steel Corp., the Read Drug and Chemical Warehouse, Sheppard-Pratt Hospital and the city of Baltimore, where he was a certified auto technician at its Calvert Heights garage.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Josh Mitchell and Tanika White and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporters | May 10, 2008
As Myanmar's military government has thwarted international efforts to deliver aid to thousands of people affected by last week's cyclone, Baltimore-based organizations are raising money to help victims and waiting to see if partner organizations will be able to gain entry into the devastated country. The political hindrance "adds a level of frustration" for aid workers, said Paul Rebman, director of disaster response for Baltimore-based World Relief. The aid group has partnered with five other organizations, two of which already had staff on the ground in Myanmar - a fact that helped to ease their assistance efforts, Rebman said.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
Not even steady rain and 700 miles could come between Brian Silver and a chance to race Lance Armstrong. Silver, along with seven of his family members, traveled from Chicago to Columbia to join in a 5-kilometer race yesterday to support the organization that helped his family through his brother's fight with cancer. Continuous early-morning showers didn't stop hundreds of runners, bikers, cancer survivors -- and Armstrong -- from supporting the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults race, part of a weekend-long event that brought in more than $500,000 for the organization.
NEWS
By Joanna F. Smiley and Joanna F. Smiley,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2007
Four years ago, Kurt Clodfelter's legs gave out while he was mincing onions in his restaurant. Next thing he knew, the room swallowed him up and - smack - his 230-pound body hit the floor. Three months later, he learned why: he had relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis - a well-known diagnosis but one long considered, in his words, "a chick's disease" because it strikes three women for every man it devastates. The degenerative neurological condition, which affects 400,000 Americans and up to 2.5 million worldwide, can produce a wide variety of symptoms.
BUSINESS
By James Rainey and James Rainey,Chicago Tribune | November 9, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad and prominent investor Ron Burkle submitted a bid yesterday to buy Tribune Co., whose holdings include the Los Angeles Times. Details about the offer and the price that the pair would be willing to pay remained unclear, but the Los Angeles-based businessmen have said for months that they wanted a local group to take control of the Times. "Affiliates of the Broad Investment Co. and [Burkle's] Yucaipa Cos. have submitted a competitive bid for acquisition of the entire Tribune company," a source familiar with the offer said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Local and national Muslim leaders denounced yesterday a recent speech by Pope Benedict XVI that included a 14th-century reference describing the Prophet Muhammad's teachings as "evil and inhuman" and urged the pope to carry on the outreach of his predecessor. The Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations called for Muslim-Catholic dialogue and said it is seeking a meeting with the Vatican's Washington representative. "Let us all continue the interfaith efforts promoted by the late Pope John Paul II, who made great strides in bringing Muslims and Catholics together for the common good," the council said in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By K. CONNIE KANG AND STEPHEN CLARK and K. CONNIE KANG AND STEPHEN CLARK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2006
Episcopal church leaders yesterday rejected a temporary ban against gay bishops, while Presbyterians agreed to let local and regional governing bodies decide whether to ordain gay or lesbian ministers. The actions by the churches' governing assemblies could cause further rifts in denominations already coping with theological divisions over homosexuality and declining membership. The Episcopal House of Deputies, composed of more than 800 lay leaders and clergy, has been meeting in Columbus, Ohio.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2005
The line "Bah, humbug!" will resound from Annapolis to Arnold to Brooklyn Park to Savage when local theater groups tell the classic tale of miserly Ebenezer Scrooge. Three adaptations of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol - one nonmusical opening tonight and two musical versions opening next weekend - will bring Scrooge and his line to his past, present and future Christmases of Victorian London. All three productions promise to respect Dickens' original words revealing Scrooge's transformation from selfish skinflint to open-hearted merchant sharing his wealth with those around him. Pasadena Theatre Company's production opens tonight in Arnold at Anne Arundel Community College's Humanities Recital Hall with a 55-member cast of professional-caliber, all-volunteer Maryland-based actors, many from Anne Arundel County.
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