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By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Mayor Martin O'Malley told a congressional panel yesterday that the federal government needs to quickly funnel more money to local governments to help protect cities from terrorism. O'Malley's testimony before the Senate Appropriations Committee was meant to jump-start legislation to create a $3.5 billion Homeland Security block grant program in which money would go to local governments. `War on two fronts' "Today, we are fighting a different kind of war on two fronts," the mayor said.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff Thomas W. Waldron and Larry Carson contributed to this nTC story | October 8, 1991
Scores of angry protesters converged on the State House today to wave signs and voice their outrage at severe budget cuts proposed by the governor.Meanwhile, Senate and House leaders are nearing an agreement to stave off about one-fifth of those cuts -- such as to state police, welfare recipients and drug treatment programs -- without raising taxes.To do so, lawmakers are considering additional cuts in state aid to local governments and schools, as well as furloughs and early retirements for state government workers, Del. Charles J. Ryan, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said today.
NEWS
By DONALD F. NORRIS | July 9, 1995
The editorial of June 24 (''State of the City: the Suburbs' Stake'') concerns the need for cooperation among the principal local governments in the Baltimore metropolitan area.Clearly, cooperation is necessary, even vital, to the well-being of the entire region. Unfortunately, at least five important structural factors, as well as citizen attitudes and behaviors, make cooperation unlikely.First, local governments possess constitutional and legal status, and as such are autonomous political entities.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
Local governments that charge for ambulance service keep their immunity from most malpractice-type lawsuits against paramedics, the state's highest court ruled yesterday in a Baltimore case closely watched by area municipalities. In a split decision, the majority of the Court of Appeals held that rescue workers are immune from the lawsuits. The possibility that governments might lose their immunity by making patients pay for paramedics has been a key factor in keeping many jurisdictions from charging for ambulance service.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2000
UNITED NATIONS -- After years of treading carefully around the issue of why so many countries stay poor or get poorer, the United Nations said in a report yesterday that much of the blame goes to bad government, a message that many leaders seeking more aid and debt relief do not want to hear. The report from the U.N. Development Program, the world's largest aid agency, is a call to rethink traditional ideas about battling poverty in the Third World. The report elevates "good governance" to the top priority in fighting poverty by the development program's new administrator, Mark Malloch Brown, whose organization supports a range of governance projects.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
Maryland's highest court was the scene yesterday of the latest skirmish in the war between tobacco interests and local governments.On one side of the domed Annapolis courtroom stood Bruce C. Bereano, the flamboyant lobbyist for the Tobacco Institute and lawyer for two cigarette vending machine companies.On behalf of Allied and D.C. vending companies, he urged the Court of Appeals to overturn laws that severely restrict the placement of cigarette machines in Takoma Park and Bowie.To his left stood his legal opponent, Angus Everton, who represents the two cities.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The recession has hit Baltimore and Maryland counties harder than it has many local governments elsewhere, according to a survey by the National Association of Counties.The survey found that local governments, and their citizens, have fared worse in those states where local budgets are funded to a considerable extent by taxes closely tied to local economies. Maryland counties have suffered because of their reliance on income taxes and taxes based on real estate transactions, an association researcher said.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | January 27, 2014
Marylanders who thought our debate over transportation taxes ended with last year's historic gas tax increase may be in for a surprise. A new study released by the O'Malley-Brown administration suggests that state government's long arm may reach into the commuter's wallet yet again. Quietly released in December, the report from the Local and Regional Transportation Funding Task Force floats the concept of regional transportation financing authorities, or RTAs, that would enable Maryland's local governments to impose new taxes to pay for road projects and transit operations.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
Who is to blame for the mounting budget deficits in state and local governments? Local officials fault the regional slowdown that has sapped income and development-related tax revenues. Analysts point to years of short-sighted overspending by local governments fueled by boom-generated tax dollars and public demand. At the state level, legislators are also reaping a healthy serving of blame for missing early warnings of trouble ahead.Governments in virtually every jurisdiction have been hit between the eyes by circumstances within and outside their control.
NEWS
December 8, 2000
SOME PEOPLE SEEM to think that Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger is pulling a fast one by not signing the comprehensive rezoning ordinance covering the northern section of the county. They're convinced he's giving developers a 17-day window to slip in a subdivision or two before the more restrictive zoning takes effect. They should stop worrying. Mr. Ruppersberger's concern is about the impact of this ordinance on properties owned by religious institutions, not homebuilders.
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