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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Mayor Martin O'Malley told a congressional panel yesterday that the federal government needs to quickly funnel more money to local governments to help protect cities from terrorism. O'Malley's testimony before the Senate Appropriations Committee was meant to jump-start legislation to create a $3.5 billion Homeland Security block grant program in which money would go to local governments. `War on two fronts' "Today, we are fighting a different kind of war on two fronts," the mayor said.
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NEWS
By DONALD F. NORRIS | July 9, 1995
The editorial of June 24 (''State of the City: the Suburbs' Stake'') concerns the need for cooperation among the principal local governments in the Baltimore metropolitan area.Clearly, cooperation is necessary, even vital, to the well-being of the entire region. Unfortunately, at least five important structural factors, as well as citizen attitudes and behaviors, make cooperation unlikely.First, local governments possess constitutional and legal status, and as such are autonomous political entities.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff Thomas W. Waldron and Larry Carson contributed to this nTC story | October 8, 1991
Scores of angry protesters converged on the State House today to wave signs and voice their outrage at severe budget cuts proposed by the governor.Meanwhile, Senate and House leaders are nearing an agreement to stave off about one-fifth of those cuts -- such as to state police, welfare recipients and drug treatment programs -- without raising taxes.To do so, lawmakers are considering additional cuts in state aid to local governments and schools, as well as furloughs and early retirements for state government workers, Del. Charles J. Ryan, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said today.
FEATURES
April 10, 2012
In a move aimed at helping Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts, the General Assembly adopted a bill late last night mandating that Maryland's largest localities, including Baltimore city and its suburbs, levy fees on their residents to pay for controlling polluted runoff from streets, parking lots and buildings. HB987 cleared the Senate after a protracted debate and repeated efforts by opponents to limit the requirement.  All failed, though senators did exempt state, county and municipal governments and volunteer fire companies from having to pay any fees.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
Maryland's highest court was the scene yesterday of the latest skirmish in the war between tobacco interests and local governments.On one side of the domed Annapolis courtroom stood Bruce C. Bereano, the flamboyant lobbyist for the Tobacco Institute and lawyer for two cigarette vending machine companies.On behalf of Allied and D.C. vending companies, he urged the Court of Appeals to overturn laws that severely restrict the placement of cigarette machines in Takoma Park and Bowie.To his left stood his legal opponent, Angus Everton, who represents the two cities.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The recession has hit Baltimore and Maryland counties harder than it has many local governments elsewhere, according to a survey by the National Association of Counties.The survey found that local governments, and their citizens, have fared worse in those states where local budgets are funded to a considerable extent by taxes closely tied to local economies. Maryland counties have suffered because of their reliance on income taxes and taxes based on real estate transactions, an association researcher said.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
Who is to blame for the mounting budget deficits in state and local governments? Local officials fault the regional slowdown that has sapped income and development-related tax revenues. Analysts point to years of short-sighted overspending by local governments fueled by boom-generated tax dollars and public demand. At the state level, legislators are also reaping a healthy serving of blame for missing early warnings of trouble ahead.Governments in virtually every jurisdiction have been hit between the eyes by circumstances within and outside their control.
NEWS
December 8, 2000
SOME PEOPLE SEEM to think that Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger is pulling a fast one by not signing the comprehensive rezoning ordinance covering the northern section of the county. They're convinced he's giving developers a 17-day window to slip in a subdivision or two before the more restrictive zoning takes effect. They should stop worrying. Mr. Ruppersberger's concern is about the impact of this ordinance on properties owned by religious institutions, not homebuilders.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
With the 2014 general election almost exactly one year away, at least five of Maryland's gubernatorial candidates are scheduled to debate environmental issues for the first time tomorrow in Annapolis. No doubt questions will range from smart growth to climate change to the future of the Chesapeake Bay, but surely no topic is likely to prove more contentious than what Maryland should do about polluted run-off from city and suburban streets. Voters would be wise to pay attention to what the candidates have to say on the subject as it may prove the best way to sort those who claim to care about clean water from those who are willing to do something about it. The political grandstanding over the state's "rain tax" has been one of the more disheartening developments to hit the local environmental movement in recent years.
NEWS
By Tim Rowland | October 17, 2011
Here, recycling is the name of the game. Copper and aluminum obviously, but also steel, brick and even seemingly worthless nuggets of concrete from demolished buildings find their way to new and productive uses. Grasses are planted to protect critical wetlands near the Chesapeake Bay, and further toward the Appalachian Piedmont, new trees will help protect tributaries of the Potomac River. Dedicated individuals pick up trash along miles of highway and reclaim historic sites. The mission spans the generations, as well; kids tend raised beds, pick cucumbers and make friends with writhing red worms in rich black soil.
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