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September 13, 2012
Granted, Wendy Rosen, the Democratic challenger to Republican Rep. Andy Harris in the 1 s t Congressional District, has property in Florida, and apparently she could, under Maryland law, participate in local elections there. But was it possible to register for those local elections without also picking up access to state and federal elections there as well? I have heard of separate registrations being held for local elections. There was a case in Delaware, I believe, where a man who was teaching his son about the election process showed up for a local election only to find he wasn't registered for it. This points out the need to alert voters who are registering for the first time that there could be a separate registration for local elections.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
Dr. Richard Grubb, a dentist from Havre de Grace, was elected an Honored Fellow at the American Academy of Implant Dentistry's 62nd Annual Meeting. The Honored Fellow designation is awarded to members of the AAID who, through their professional, clinical, research or academic endeavors, have distinguished themselves within implant dentistry. Established in 1951, the AAID is the oldest implant organization in the world. The Academy is the only implant organization that offers implant credentials protected by federal court decisions.
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NEWS
November 13, 1995
ON A CONTINENT that has had more than its share of turmoil and disasters, South Africa continues to beam a ray of hope. Granted, much of the euphoria of the first days of majority rule in the spring of 1994 has been tempered by the hard facts of real life. But President Nelson Mandela governs by pragmatism and South African voters are proving to be surprisingly astute, considering that the country was long deprived of real democracy.The recent local elections are a case in point. The ANC rallied, gaining about 60 percent of the vote, to no one's surprise.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Baltimore City residents will vote next week on whether to elect city officials at the same time they cast their ballots for president — but their choice could be merely symbolic. State lawmakers passed a measure this year to align city elections with the presidential cycle, and lawyers for the General Assembly believe that law would override city residents' vote. Opponents of the change say that legislators should revisit the issue, known as Question K, if voters reject the charter amendment.
NEWS
May 9, 1997
THE EARLY RETURNS are in, and the results are dismally clear. Voter participation in Carroll County municipal elections is near record-low levels.Taneytown had about 50 people voting for three council members. Sykesville turned out only 85 residents, 5 percent of those eligible, to choose a mayor and three councilpersons.Westminster's election results are already known. There are no contested races next Monday for mayor or the two councilpositions in the county's largest municipality, despite a 6-cent property tax increase just approved.
NEWS
By Victoria Burnett and Victoria Burnett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Getting people to turn out and vote is always a problem in Latin America. But with municipal elections scheduled Sunday, the Colombian government faces a challenge just in getting people to stand for office.Leftist rebels striving to scupper the election process have murdered at least 26 candidates and abducted and threatened other political hopefuls. More than 1,100 candidates have pulled out of political races. At least a million Colombians, of a total population of 36 million, will have nobody to vote for this weekend.
NEWS
April 24, 1994
Local elections will be held May 3 in the cities of Aberdeen and Havre de Grace. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.Havre de Grace will elect three members of the city council for two-year terms. Eight candidates are vying for the positions.Aberdeen voters will select a mayor and two members of the City Council, all for two-year terms. Two candidates are running for mayor, and six hopefuls are competing for the two council seats. Statements by the mayoral candidates, Mayor Ruth Elliott and councilman Charles R. Boutin, appear above.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1999
BEIJING -- Election observers from the Carter Center in Atlanta broke yesterday from their previous upbeat assessments of local elections in China, issuing a largely negative report on balloting they found riddled with "irregularities in almost all stages."Despite the drawbacks, observers applauded the enthusiasm of Chinese voters.And at least some were perplexed that China has maintained this sliver of openness when it is in the midst of a crackdown on pro-democracy activists in the big cities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1996
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After years of deadly political conflict, South Africa's KwaZulu/Natal Province held its first free local elections last week, and now that the votes have finally been counted, it appears that the province's archrivals have neither gained nor lost much ground.As in the first post-apartheid general election in 1994, the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party led by Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi swept the province's vast rural areas. President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress triumphed in the cities and suburbs.
NEWS
April 3, 2001
U.N. rights chief reverses decision, wants to stay on UNITED NATIONS - Mary Robinson has reversed her decision to step down as U.N. human rights chief and asked for a one-year extension of her term, the United Nations said yesterday. Two weeks ago, Robinson said she would leave her post in September, at the end of her four-year term. She said she thought she could do more outside the constraints of the U.N. system. But U.N. officials said that after expressions of regret at her departure from many quarters, she asked for a one-year extension.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley has canceled Monday's early voting in Maryland due to Hurricane Sandy's expected arrival. Government offices and schools around the region also have announced that they plan to close Monday, and most flights out of Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been canceled. More than 200 flights scheduled to land at or leave from BWI Monday had already been canceled as of Sunday evening, according to FlightStats.com. Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the airport, said most carriers had indicated they would cancel all flights Monday and monitor the storm to make a decision about Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Granted, Wendy Rosen, the Democratic challenger to Republican Rep. Andy Harris in the 1 s t Congressional District, has property in Florida, and apparently she could, under Maryland law, participate in local elections there. But was it possible to register for those local elections without also picking up access to state and federal elections there as well? I have heard of separate registrations being held for local elections. There was a case in Delaware, I believe, where a man who was teaching his son about the election process showed up for a local election only to find he wasn't registered for it. This points out the need to alert voters who are registering for the first time that there could be a separate registration for local elections.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
Your editorial laments the poor voter turn-out in last week's general election and suggests local elections should be rescheduled to coincide with state and national elections ("A waste of time, money," Nov. 13). But the real problem is the more general lack of participation in civic activities. For examples, one need only look at the decline in membership in community associations, school PTAs, even church attendance, where pastors have seen substantial drops. Newspaper readership is down as well, with people opting to get their news from the Internet or one-minute segments on television.
NEWS
November 15, 2011
The archaic practice of having local government elections based on party politics is the reason turnout at the polls and is so embarrassing. During the primary voting in September, the street in front of my polling place was crowded with people bearing signs and distributing literature. When I visited the same site during November's general election, they were all gone. I come from the West, where city councilmen, mayors, county councilmen, sheriffs and district attorneys all run in non-partisan elections.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
For one day at least, at a church in Dundalk, politician was not a dirty word. For the sixth straight year, Calvary Baptist Church paid tribute to the work of elected officials and political candidates along with police officers, firefighters and other emergency workers. The headliner for the event was former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican who is seeking to take his old job back from Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley — a no-show. He was joined by county-level politicians, Republicans and Democrats, both officeholders and those who aspire to be, in accepting the thanks of a grateful congregation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 2008
LONDON -- Boris Johnson, the floppy-haired media celebrity and Conservative member of Parliament who transformed himself from a shambling, amusing-aphorism-uttering figure of fun into a plausible political force, was elected mayor of London yesterday. Johnson's surprising victory was not only a triumph of his own singular style, but also a resounding public rebuke to the Labor government of Prime Minister Gordon Brown in a day full of such rebukes. As votes were tallied across the country after Thursday's elections, it emerged that the Labor Party had suffered its worst local election results in at least 40 years.
NEWS
October 30, 2006
It has not been a banner week for public confidence in the election process. Reports of past hardware problems in the touch-screen voting machines, the leak of confidential, if outdated, software, and concern over a possible shortage of absentee ballots in certain jurisdictions have caused nearly as much attention to be paid to the mechanics of Election Day as to the candidates whose names will appear on the ballots. But let's set the record straight: Don't buy the hype. Many of these concerns are overstated, and mixed in with the bad news are signs that Nov. 7 could turn out to be a fairly routine Election Day after all. The biggest threat to the election is not that votes will be miscounted but that too many voters will be discouraged from going to the polls.
NEWS
December 7, 1996
WRONG-HEADEDNESS on the part of Serbia's strong-man president, Slobodan Milosevic, transformed protests against stolen Nov. 17 local elections into a mass movement to oust him. More and more, in 18 days of ever-larger demonstrations, the shouting was directed at the top.That may have been surprising to him. Only on Nov. 3, a coalition of the Socialist Party of Mr. Milosevic and the Yugoslav United Left (or Communist) Party of his powerful wife, Mirjana Marcovic, had retained parliamentary control in an apparently fair election.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 8, 2007
Pencil in hand, Dottie McGeehan checked one box for mayor and two of the four boxes listing City Council candidates in the Taneytown election yesterday. Then she emerged from the curtained stall at City Hall - the only polling place open for this election - folded her paper ballot and slipped it into a simple wooden box secured with a padlock. As controversy swirls around the state over computerized voting machines, early voting and other changes in election operations, most of Carroll County's eight municipalities have stuck with the tried-and-true paper ballots as they conduct their city and town elections this month.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 2006
CHICAGO -- When John Kerry came in second in the presidential election, he had to go back to the U.S. Senate, where having a defeated candidate around causes some awkwardness. That was nothing compared with the discomfort felt by Ayman Nour, the 2004 runner-up in Egypt's first multicandidate presidential election. Sentenced last December to five years in prison on a dubious forgery conviction, he was charged in February with slandering the victorious incumbent, Hosni Mubarak, by calling him "a loser," which is not only untrue but, as long as Mubarak is president, impossible.
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