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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
At Liam Flynn's Ale House in Baltimore's Station North Arts and Entertainment District, two George Washingtons will get you a can of Natty Boh. But a single Baltimore BNote, with an image of Frederick Douglass on one side and an oriole on the other, will get you the same beer at half price. It's a special the bar's proprietors use to promote the circulation of the local currency. "It's a deal - and people take advantage of it every day," said Liam Flynn. "Usually it's about 20 BNotes a day. " The BNote recently turned 2 years old and is now accepted at more than 200 local businesses.
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NEWS
May 14, 2013
Regarding Steve Kilar's article on Baltimore's local currency, I love the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). What a great way to support the people, places and businesses that make this city great. Whenever I go someplace new I make sure to ask "do you take BNotes yet?" It helps to let them know we're interested, and that we care about our local economy. I can't wait to see where this project goes from here. I love Bmore! I love BNotes! Damien Nichols, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
One lucky Baltimore resident will be able to swap some green in exchange for a dinner for two, but it won't be George Washington's face on the bill. BNote, a local currency bearing the names and faces of famous Baltimoreans such as Frederick Douglass and Edgar Allan Poe, was launched Sunday in Hampden as officials of the Baltimore Green Currency Association celebrated a new effort to support local economies. A bundle of green balloons carrying an envelope was let loose in the wind — with instructions for the lucky finder on how to cash in a BNote for a dinner at Woodberry Kitchen — signifying the first BNote released to the public, via a biodegradable, helium balloon.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Steve Kilar's excellent article on Baltimore's local currency highlighted the process of launching and growing the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). Missing from the article, however, was an assessment of the economic benefits of local currencies on communities. Local currencies stimulate the economy by encouraging local spending. A 2008 study conducted by Civic Economics showed significant economic impact from local spending in Western Michigan.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Just read the article by Steve Kilar about Baltimore's local currency, the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). This is such a great idea. I'm headed out to find some BNotes, have dinner at Cafe Hon and then head up to Liam Flynn's Ale House for a couple of Bohs. Jack Arnold, Middle River
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Regarding Steve Kilar's article on Baltimore's local currency, I love the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). What a great way to support the people, places and businesses that make this city great. Whenever I go someplace new I make sure to ask "do you take BNotes yet?" It helps to let them know we're interested, and that we care about our local economy. I can't wait to see where this project goes from here. I love Bmore! I love BNotes! Damien Nichols, Baltimore
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Thanks for your excellent article on Baltimore's local currency ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). I've been spending BNotes since their inception, and I often go out of my way to visit businesses that accept them. When I spend a dollar in Baltimore, I don't know where that dollar will wind up; it may wind up in a distant part of the country or even invested overseas. When I spend a BNote, it feels good to know that I'm keeping wealth circulating right here in our city.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Steve Kilar's excellent article on Baltimore's local currency highlighted the process of launching and growing the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). Missing from the article, however, was an assessment of the economic benefits of local currencies on communities. Local currencies stimulate the economy by encouraging local spending. A 2008 study conducted by Civic Economics showed significant economic impact from local spending in Western Michigan.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
I was happy to see Steve Kilar's article on the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). Baltimore has been an increasingly exciting place to live over the last few years for those familiar with recent grassroots projects like the BNote and other programs sponsored by the nonprofit Fusion Partnerships. Without waiting for government, citizens are organizing and embracing innovative and inspirational community approaches to contemporary challenges, and this leads to a new sense of what is possible here.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 30, 2004
ZAANDAM, Netherlands - Royal Ahold NV, the Dutch food retailer that overstated profit for three years, said yesterday that its second-quarter sales fell 4.8 percent as the euro's gains eroded its U.S. revenue. Revenue dropped to 12.3 billion euros ($14.8 billion) from 13 billion euros a year earlier, the supermarket operator said. Analysts had forecast sales of 12.1 billion euros. Ahold, the owner of U.S. grocery chains including Landover-based Giant Food Inc., aims to sell assets worth 2.5 billion euros by next year in a bid to regain its investment-grade credit rating.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
I was happy to see Steve Kilar's article on the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). Baltimore has been an increasingly exciting place to live over the last few years for those familiar with recent grassroots projects like the BNote and other programs sponsored by the nonprofit Fusion Partnerships. Without waiting for government, citizens are organizing and embracing innovative and inspirational community approaches to contemporary challenges, and this leads to a new sense of what is possible here.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Just read the article by Steve Kilar about Baltimore's local currency, the BNote ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). This is such a great idea. I'm headed out to find some BNotes, have dinner at Cafe Hon and then head up to Liam Flynn's Ale House for a couple of Bohs. Jack Arnold, Middle River
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Thanks for your excellent article on Baltimore's local currency ("Baltimore's local currency, the BNote, is 2 years old," May 7). I've been spending BNotes since their inception, and I often go out of my way to visit businesses that accept them. When I spend a dollar in Baltimore, I don't know where that dollar will wind up; it may wind up in a distant part of the country or even invested overseas. When I spend a BNote, it feels good to know that I'm keeping wealth circulating right here in our city.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
At Liam Flynn's Ale House in Baltimore's Station North Arts and Entertainment District, two George Washingtons will get you a can of Natty Boh. But a single Baltimore BNote, with an image of Frederick Douglass on one side and an oriole on the other, will get you the same beer at half price. It's a special the bar's proprietors use to promote the circulation of the local currency. "It's a deal - and people take advantage of it every day," said Liam Flynn. "Usually it's about 20 BNotes a day. " The BNote recently turned 2 years old and is now accepted at more than 200 local businesses.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
One lucky Baltimore resident will be able to swap some green in exchange for a dinner for two, but it won't be George Washington's face on the bill. BNote, a local currency bearing the names and faces of famous Baltimoreans such as Frederick Douglass and Edgar Allan Poe, was launched Sunday in Hampden as officials of the Baltimore Green Currency Association celebrated a new effort to support local economies. A bundle of green balloons carrying an envelope was let loose in the wind — with instructions for the lucky finder on how to cash in a BNote for a dinner at Woodberry Kitchen — signifying the first BNote released to the public, via a biodegradable, helium balloon.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
A Baltimore group wants to put civic pride in your wallet. The Baltimore Green Currency Association, a nonprofit that aims to help small restaurants and mom-and-pop retailers fend off the big chains, is trying to build an alternative economy — mostly in Hampden. To do so, the group plans to issue a local currency called BNotes. Update: The BNote is now in circulation. Customers wanting to buy local could use the currency at more than 25 businesses. And they would get a built-in discount because $10 would get you 11 BNotes, which could be exchanged dollar-for-BNote at designated merchants.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1992
AMMAN, Jordan -- Iraq's economy is the target of a U.S.-led destabilization campaign to pour vast amounts of counterfeit currency into the country, Arab and Western officials here say.The fake dinar notes are being smuggled across the Jordanian, Saudi, Turkish and Iranian borders in an effort to undermine the Iraqi economy, said the officials here who closely monitor the situation inside Iraq.Those officials said counterfeit dollars were being smuggled into Iraq in smaller quantities to confound the banking system further.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
A Baltimore group wants to put civic pride in your wallet. The Baltimore Green Currency Association, a nonprofit that aims to help small restaurants and mom-and-pop retailers fend off the big chains, is trying to build an alternative economy — mostly in Hampden. To do so, the group plans to issue a local currency called BNotes. Update: The BNote is now in circulation. Customers wanting to buy local could use the currency at more than 25 businesses. And they would get a built-in discount because $10 would get you 11 BNotes, which could be exchanged dollar-for-BNote at designated merchants.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 30, 2004
ZAANDAM, Netherlands - Royal Ahold NV, the Dutch food retailer that overstated profit for three years, said yesterday that its second-quarter sales fell 4.8 percent as the euro's gains eroded its U.S. revenue. Revenue dropped to 12.3 billion euros ($14.8 billion) from 13 billion euros a year earlier, the supermarket operator said. Analysts had forecast sales of 12.1 billion euros. Ahold, the owner of U.S. grocery chains including Landover-based Giant Food Inc., aims to sell assets worth 2.5 billion euros by next year in a bid to regain its investment-grade credit rating.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | February 6, 2000
THE EURO has slumped in recent weeks after stronger than expected economic growth. In the United States on Monday, the currency hit a record low of 96.65 U.S. cents, a decline of about 17 percent since it was adopted by 11 of the 15 European Union countries in January 1999. While some have expressed concern about the euro's slide, Dutch Finance Minister Gerrit Zalm called it "a good investment opportunity." What caused the euro's decline against the U.S. dollar? What does it mean for Europe?
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