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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
Julia Seeley, 10, burst into the bustling kitchen in a church hall shortly before 5 p.m. and shouted, "There's buses here!" The first guests began arriving nearly an hour early for a traditional Thanksgiving feast that was still in the making, Although they were preparing about 200 meals, organizers of the 31st annual Greater Towson Jaycees dinner for seniors remained unruffled and on task. They mixed stuffing with herbs and broth and tended steaming caldrons brimming with sweet potatoes, green vegetables and sauerkraut, relying on the dining room help to tend to the guests.
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NEWS
BiJoe Burris | August 8, 2014
The Anne Arundel County school system is anticipating more than 8,000 county residents to attend back-to-school events that offer resources and information for the upcoming school year. For the fourth consecutive year, the school system is staging its Back-to-School Expo in partnership with Abundant Life Church in Glen Burnie. The Aug. 23 event is slated to be part of the church's Super Saturday Kids Carnival. On Fort Meade, the school system will launch its inaugural Back-to-School Bash on Aug. 16 at Meade Middle School, in conjunction with the  i5 Church and the Full Gospel Emancipation Life Center, both located in Odenton.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 23, 2007
The pastor read out 13 names at a "service of comfort" in his East Baltimore church -- the apparent dead and injured from yesterday's rowhouse blaze a few blocks away. Gasps and sobs were the response from the hundreds of people gathered in sadness in the Ark Church sanctuary as the Rev. James L. Carter shared the names he had gathered -- still unconfirmed by authorities -- of those who perished in, or survived, the tragedy on Cecil Avenue. Four of the dead were children, he said -- the youngest just 3 years old. "We can't stop the tears from flowing," Carter told the crowd at the church in the 1200 block of E. North Ave. "It's all right to cry."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
From Rep. Elijah E. Cummings playing a leading role in televised hearings on American deaths in Benghazi, to the Game Show Network visiting a Baltimore church to play matchmaker for a member of the congregation, there is going to be a distinct local flavor to summertime TV this year. Here are 10 shows, stories and trends to look for in and on Baltimore television in coming weeks - for better or worse. “It Takes a Church” debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday on GSN. The reality-TV series hosted by gospel singer Natalie Grant visits a different church each week and, with the help of the pastor and congregation members, plays the dating game.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2012
This is the time each year when America celebrates labor. When better for a story about a family who risked their very lives for the opportunity to work in America? Despite frequent criticism of organized religion, there are times when the church gets it right. Such was the case in 1957, when a local middle-class congregation made a difference in the lives of a family from halfway around the world. Who would have thought that an act of kindness could have such a lasting impact on a family and a community?
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
A Maryland Court of Appeals judge yesterday accused members of a Prince George's County church of organizing "a campaign to intimidate this court" by sending letters to the judges, urging them to rule in favor of their church in a property lawsuit. Judge Dale R. Cathell angrily interrupted Jack Lipson, who represents From the Heart Church Ministries, during the beginning of his statement to ask if he knew that his clients had picketed the courthouse during a previous hearing and wrote 30 to 50 letters to each of the seven judges, all ending with what the judge paraphrased as, "We will remember in November."
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
Eight years ago, Lindley G. DeGarmo was making $1 million a year, traveling around the world putting together multibillion-dollar deals as the head of Salomon Brothers' global power group. This month, significantly poorer but wiser, DeGarmo was installed as the pastor of the 925-member congregation at Towson Presbyterian Church in a ceremony filled with well-wishers. The leap from business to the ministry was a huge one for DeGarmo, 50, who is married and has a 9-year-old daughter. For Towson Presbyterian, DeGarmo - with his financial expertise and managerial skills - seemed heaven-sent.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
The message of Pope Francis about economic fairness is loud and clear, and we need to get with the program. Unfortunately, the current leader of the Archdiocese of Baltimore has a different agenda. He is busy leading an unsuccessful crusade to Never-Never Land. We need to get busy and correct some of our mistakes. The church does a pretty good job of feeding the hungry and housing the homeless, but we need to return to empowering the youth of Baltimore which will help them move forward in the future.
NEWS
By Emma Brown and The Washington Post | December 8, 2009
A Colorado woman who won a $1.2 million home in Edgewater in a $50-a-ticket raffle last January has sold the property to a local church at a bargain-basement price. "Hooray, finally!" said Karen McHale, 47, who lives in a home she built with her husband in the mountains west of Denver and never intended to move to the Mid-Atlantic. "I tell you, that was a giant rock around my neck." McHale said she bought two raffle tickets last year as a contribution to the charity that was co-sponsoring the contest, which came about when a mortgage broker teamed up with the Annapolis-based We Care and Friends, which helps at-risk youths, to sell his home.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
The news media has focused considerable attention on the recent interview with Pope Francis ("Pope Francis faults Catholic Church's focus on gay marriage, abortion," Sept. 19). I have now read the entire published interview, and it is truly remarkable. The interview reveals the pope as a highly intellectual and cultured man who is also authentically humble. He clearly believes that the church needs to be involved with all mankind. Some of his remarks seem to be directed at the hierarchy and clergy, but I wonder how the pope's vision for the church will play out in the local Baltimore Catholic community.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
The message of Pope Francis about economic fairness is loud and clear, and we need to get with the program. Unfortunately, the current leader of the Archdiocese of Baltimore has a different agenda. He is busy leading an unsuccessful crusade to Never-Never Land. We need to get busy and correct some of our mistakes. The church does a pretty good job of feeding the hungry and housing the homeless, but we need to return to empowering the youth of Baltimore which will help them move forward in the future.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
The news media has focused considerable attention on the recent interview with Pope Francis ("Pope Francis faults Catholic Church's focus on gay marriage, abortion," Sept. 19). I have now read the entire published interview, and it is truly remarkable. The interview reveals the pope as a highly intellectual and cultured man who is also authentically humble. He clearly believes that the church needs to be involved with all mankind. Some of his remarks seem to be directed at the hierarchy and clergy, but I wonder how the pope's vision for the church will play out in the local Baltimore Catholic community.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2012
This is the time each year when America celebrates labor. When better for a story about a family who risked their very lives for the opportunity to work in America? Despite frequent criticism of organized religion, there are times when the church gets it right. Such was the case in 1957, when a local middle-class congregation made a difference in the lives of a family from halfway around the world. Who would have thought that an act of kindness could have such a lasting impact on a family and a community?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
Julia Seeley, 10, burst into the bustling kitchen in a church hall shortly before 5 p.m. and shouted, "There's buses here!" The first guests began arriving nearly an hour early for a traditional Thanksgiving feast that was still in the making, Although they were preparing about 200 meals, organizers of the 31st annual Greater Towson Jaycees dinner for seniors remained unruffled and on task. They mixed stuffing with herbs and broth and tended steaming caldrons brimming with sweet potatoes, green vegetables and sauerkraut, relying on the dining room help to tend to the guests.
EXPLORE
By Aegis correspondent | July 13, 2011
Vacation Bible School at Franklin Baptist Church from July 25-29 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for kids ages 4 - 17 with transportation available by calling Rick Wilson at 410-378-5346. The church is at 2106 Franklin Church Road in Darlington. All are welcome to attend. Vacation Bible School will be Aug. 1 through Aug. 5 at the Dublin United Methodist Church. A light supper will be served beginning at 5 p.m., followed by the start of the program. For further information call 410-836-3647.
EXPLORE
July 13, 2011
Take the family out for breakfast Saturday, July 16, when Holy Nativity Lutheran Church's seasoned chefs offer sweets and savories from 9-11 a.m. at 1200 Linden Ave. This repast is free with no reservations required. Get tasty tidbits at 410-242-9441 or walk in. Bring your children to Halethorpe-Relay United Methodist Church, 4513 Ridge Ave., for the shake it up worship hour at 11 am. Sunday, July 17. Youngsters will lead with toe-tapping tunes, interpretive dances and skits about God's bounty.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2001
WILMINGTON, N.C. - A groundbreaking, two-year nationwide study based at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington has identified some 300 Protestant congregations and 300 Catholic parishes as examples of local church excellence. "Churches like these are beacons of hope in a very confusing time when people are looking for moral guidance and a sense of belonging, of true community," said Paul Wilkes, director of the Parish/Congregation Study and a creative writing professor at UNCW.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1991
Lutheran bishop of El Salvador coming to city church SundayLutheran Bishop Medardo Gomez of El Salvador will speak at two local Lutheran churches this Sunday.Local church officials say Gomez is visiting the United States to publicize the plight of the civilians of the small Central American nation ravaged by civil war for more than a decade.The bishop will appear at the 9 a.m. service of the Lutheran Church of the Living Word, which worships at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center in Columbia, and then at the 11 a.m. service of the Lutheran Church of the Holy Comforter, 5513 York Road in Govans.
NEWS
By Emma Brown and The Washington Post | December 8, 2009
A Colorado woman who won a $1.2 million home in Edgewater in a $50-a-ticket raffle last January has sold the property to a local church at a bargain-basement price. "Hooray, finally!" said Karen McHale, 47, who lives in a home she built with her husband in the mountains west of Denver and never intended to move to the Mid-Atlantic. "I tell you, that was a giant rock around my neck." McHale said she bought two raffle tickets last year as a contribution to the charity that was co-sponsoring the contest, which came about when a mortgage broker teamed up with the Annapolis-based We Care and Friends, which helps at-risk youths, to sell his home.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 23, 2007
The pastor read out 13 names at a "service of comfort" in his East Baltimore church -- the apparent dead and injured from yesterday's rowhouse blaze a few blocks away. Gasps and sobs were the response from the hundreds of people gathered in sadness in the Ark Church sanctuary as the Rev. James L. Carter shared the names he had gathered -- still unconfirmed by authorities -- of those who perished in, or survived, the tragedy on Cecil Avenue. Four of the dead were children, he said -- the youngest just 3 years old. "We can't stop the tears from flowing," Carter told the crowd at the church in the 1200 block of E. North Ave. "It's all right to cry."
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