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By San Francisco Chronicle | September 2, 1991
Cable bashing is one of our most popular participatory sports. easy to play, you don't have to buy rackets or bats, and it's really entertaining.Consumer Reports magazine rejoins the game in this month's issue. It plays fairly, printing the results of cable survey responses from more than 200,000 readers.The magazine found substantial consumer problems with cable bills and even higher public dudgeon over trying to communicate with cable companies.Many Americans are convinced that it's easier to phone Mars than to reach their local cable company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
All the TV stations in Baltimore say they're the ones to turn to for breaking news. Coverage of a shooting Saturday morning at the Mall in Columbia that left three dead put those promises to the test in a major way. Not everyone passed. The local stations that got there first with the most resources were WJZ (Channel 13) and WBAL (Channel 11), which were on the air shortly after 12:30 p.m. WMAR-TV was on-air with live coverage shortly after 1 p.m, but WBFF (Channel 45) didn't offer viewers anything except syndicated programming, infomercials and auto racing until 2:30 p.m. And then, it provided only 30 minutes of coverage before returning to Fox network NASCAR coverage.
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NEWS
September 21, 1997
THE INTERNET is full of messages from cable television viewers who do not like their local provider's program line-up or rates. One web page even claims that a local cable company "hates my guts" and urges: "Go bombard them with e-mail!"Hold the messages!Judge Gary I. Strausberg has ordered United Artists Cable Television to reimburse tens of thousands of Baltimore City subscribers nearly $6 million that he says the company wrongfully collected as late-payment penalties."With its $5 late fee, the cable company has taken undue advantage of consumers," he wrote, ordering the company to reduce the late fee to 50 cents.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
Ship may pose toxic threat A former World War II hospital ship that is moored in Baltimore will soon be towed to Greece, under a plan that's raising legal questions and pollution concerns. A Seattle environmental group claims the Sanctuary contains toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and that towing it abroad would violate federal rules barring the export of PCBs. Sparrows Point deal doubted The local that represents workers at Sparrows Point is questioning the sale of the plant to an investment group led by Chicago-based Esmark Inc. John Cirri, president of United Steelworkers Local 9477, sent a letter to the international union body asking it to reconsider its support of the sale to E2 Acquisition Corp.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service Rafael Alvarez of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | December 14, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission proposed new rules yesterday that would give some communities more power to limit prices for local cable television service.Under the existing FCC rules, only about 3 percent of the nation's more than 9,500 cable television systems have their rates regulated. The new rules, if enacted by the agency, could give local governments a powerful new weapon to block rate increases.In recent years, cable television rates have doubled and tripled in many cities.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | June 18, 1993
In April, Savage residents were thrilled to learn that state legislators had approved a $70,000 grant for major repairs to the Carroll Baldwin Memorial Hall.The county also agreed to give $67,000 toward renovating the 70-year-old Savage landmark that serves as the town's community center.The hard part has been the requirement that the community raise $3,000 on its own to match the grant money.Savage resident Ron Dameron recently came up with a fund-raising idea that everyone likes -- selling copies of a county-produced documentary on Savage.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
The cable company that serves the Annapolis area has rejected a proposal by the city government to add more sports programming to the basic cable packages.The Annapolis City Council voted unanimously last month to approve a new contract requiring TCI Cablevision to include in a basic cable package extras such as Home Team Sports and ESPN2, which feature local sailing shows and the Orioles, the Capitals and the Bullets.TCI Cablevision had 30 days to review that proposal and rejected it Friday, the last day of the old contract.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Legislation to regulate cable television prices was set back and probably killed yesterday when objections by three senators forced supporters of the bill to withdraw it from consideration on the Senate floor.The action was a big blow to consumer groups and aspiring rivals of the cable industry, which had been counting on the measure to help limit price increases for cable service and to foster increased competition. The price of basic cable service has doubled in many cities in the last several years, leading to many complaints from customers.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
Officials of Westinghouse Broadcasting, the parent company of Home Team Sports, are expected to mount a last-gasp effort to keep Orioles broadcasts amid signs that the team's telecasts will be controlled by a new venture.Westinghouse, one of the nation's largest broadcasting conglomerates, is expected to make a counteroffer to the Orioles this week in response to a proposal from Fox and TCI, the nation's largest cable operator.However, sources within the local broadcasting community indicate that the Fox/TCI deal with the Orioles is completed and not likely to be overturned by Westinghouse's efforts.
NEWS
By Tim Nelson and Tim Nelson,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 28, 1993
OLIVIA, Minn. -- To MTV, or not to MTV?That's the question these days in Olivia, a town of 2,620 people about two hours west of the Twin Cities.It's "The Corn Capital," according to a sign on the east edge of the city.The talk up at BOLD High School (the acronym is for Bird Island, Olivia and Lake Lillian District) and around town these days is about music videos. Ten years after the town was wired for cable TV, a group of parents say it may be time to cut the Music Television (MTV) channel out of the local cable picture.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2007
As is often the case on an outdoor film set, interruptions occurred. Traffic noise forced the production crew to stop work, performers showed up late and narrators needed time to settle into position. The difference is that the stars of this Harford County production are former stray critters that the local animal shelter is attempting to place in a home through a show on the local cable provider. "We are trying to make these animals attractive to larger numbers of people," said Tammy Zaluzney, executive director of the Humane Society of Harford County.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Jennifer McMenamin and Mary Gail Hare and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
A publicity-shy charity headquartered hundreds of miles from Maryland is quietly working on plans to build an office building in Carroll County that would provide rent-free space for area nonprofit organizations. The Georgia-based foundation has for several months met behind the scenes with Carroll charitable groups and government officials to determine how it could help serve the county's needy. Avoiding public meeting agendas and stressing the importance of proceeding with discretion, the nonprofit Anverse Inc. foundation has come up with a preliminary plan to donate space for groups such as Head Start and the Community Foundation of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2003
The Community Media Center, which has put life in Carroll County on TV for 13 years, televising everything from town meetings and candidate forums to the 4-H Fair and the Maryland Wine Festival, is about to get a new space with a soundproof studio, sophisticated lighting and advanced broadcast technology. The $1.7 million building under construction in Westminster is a vast improvement on the basement headquarters the community access television station has called home for the past decade.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
THE INTERNET is full of messages from cable television viewers who do not like their local provider's program line-up or rates. One web page even claims that a local cable company "hates my guts" and urges: "Go bombard them with e-mail!"Hold the messages!Judge Gary I. Strausberg has ordered United Artists Cable Television to reimburse tens of thousands of Baltimore City subscribers nearly $6 million that he says the company wrongfully collected as late-payment penalties."With its $5 late fee, the cable company has taken undue advantage of consumers," he wrote, ordering the company to reduce the late fee to 50 cents.
NEWS
By Erica C. Harrington and Erica C. Harrington,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
A contractor working for a local cable company caused a power outage that affected more than 1,000 people yesterday morning in Columbia's Dorsey's Search village.Communications Construction Group of Cockeysville was laying fiber-optic lines for Comcast Cablevision along Columbia Road between Old Annapolis Road and Dorsey Hall Drive and hit a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. cable at 9: 24 a.m. yesterday, said Rose Muhlhausen, a BGE spokeswoman.BGE had to shut off power until the cable could be repaired.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
Officials of Westinghouse Broadcasting, the parent company of Home Team Sports, are expected to mount a last-gasp effort to keep Orioles broadcasts amid signs that the team's telecasts will be controlled by a new venture.Westinghouse, one of the nation's largest broadcasting conglomerates, is expected to make a counteroffer to the Orioles this week in response to a proposal from Fox and TCI, the nation's largest cable operator.However, sources within the local broadcasting community indicate that the Fox/TCI deal with the Orioles is completed and not likely to be overturned by Westinghouse's efforts.
FEATURES
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | September 7, 1994
In what must be the most unintended of consequences, Congress has passed a law that is cutting television contact between many members and their constituents.In the 15 months since new federal cable regulations went into effect, C-SPAN's live coverage of Congress has been cut off or cut back by cable companies in 95 cities.Viewers in 4 million households across the country have been affected, including cable subscribers in Atlanta, Miami and Austin, Texas, said Brian Lamb, C-SPAN's founder and chief executive officer.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 29, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Regular cable grazers see so much comedy up and down the channels it sometimes seems to blur together -- and that's true even in Baltimore, where the all-laughs Comedy Channel has yet to be carried by any local cable system.It's worth noting, therefore, when something is fresh and funny, such as the latest edition of HBO's "One Night Stand" series tomorrow (at 10 p.m., with multiple repeats in April). Media Monitor laughed so hard viewing the preview tape that the dog started barking.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 22, 1996
Baltimore sports fans clamored for years for their cable operators to place Home Team Sports on a basic lineup, rather than as a premium channel, and they appear to be taking advantage now that the area's two biggest systems, TCI and Comcast, have complied.HTS officials report that Orioles ratings are booming in the Baltimore region this season, thanks to the combination of the team's fast start and the more than 300,000 additional homes the channel's signal now appears in.As an example, last Wednesday night's Orioles-Boston game on HTS did a 10.5 cable rating in the Baltimore area, the highest of the season and third-highest Orioles rating of all time, and virtually double what the Bethesda-based channel was getting for Orioles games at this time last year.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
The cable company that serves the Annapolis area has rejected a proposal by the city government to add more sports programming to the basic cable packages.The Annapolis City Council voted unanimously last month to approve a new contract requiring TCI Cablevision to include in a basic cable package extras such as Home Team Sports and ESPN2, which feature local sailing shows and the Orioles, the Capitals and the Bullets.TCI Cablevision had 30 days to review that proposal and rejected it Friday, the last day of the old contract.
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