Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLocal Artists
IN THE NEWS

Local Artists

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 7, 2012
This weekend's Baltimore Comic-Con , which fills city streets with costumed fans, will also highlight many local artists and comic book creators. Some, like Frank Cho and Greg Larocque, have illustrated Flash, Spider-Man and other classics. Others, like Janmie Noguchi, are newer to the game, and are producing works with their own characters. The Baltimore Sun took a look at five local standouts, as the convention prepares for its Saturday-Sunday run at the Baltimore Convention Center.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 16, 2014
The old-fashioned corner store is thriving on a quiet Southeast Baltimore cross street. The neighborhood institution has been repurposed as the Highlandtown Gallery, a place where local artists show their works in a well-lighted, clean place within an atmospheric Baltimore neighborhood. At the corner of Gough and Conkling, two blocks north of busy Eastern Avenue, the gallery has some traditional neighbors — a corner bar (the Laughing Pint), a funeral home (Joseph Zannino), a Roman Catholic church (Our Lady of Pompei)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Steve Jones | September 3, 2011
Growing up in Carroll County, Libby Cain always wanted to be an artist. She eventually became a school teacher, but after a long educational career ended, she pursued her childhood passion. And during the next five weeks, the fruits of her labor will be on display in her hometown of Taneytown. Cain is one of four artists whose work will be featured at an upcoming Taneytown History Museum exhibit, which opens Saturday. Sept. 10 and runs through Oct. 15. The actual museum site, at 24 E. Baltimore St,, is closed because of Taneytown's ongoing streetscape project, so the artists' work will be shown at the Taneytown branch of New Windsor State Bank, 222 E. Baltimore St., Taneytown.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Dyane Fancey, a prominent poet in Baltimore's arts community who also worked in the city school system and at a popular Mount Vernon restaurant, died April 13 of heart failure. The Hampden resident was 63. Born Diane Margaret Fancey in Washington, D.C., Ms. Fancey was the daughter of active labor union workers, and developed a feisty and rebellious attitude at an early age, replacing the "i" in her name with a "y" in order to distinguish herself from the other girls in her high school who shared her name and dotted the "i" in their names with hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 3, 2010
Eight local artists will share $80,000 in prize money to be announced this evening, the latest recipients of the Mary Sawyers Baker Awards from the William G. Baker Jr. Memorial Fund. The awards, to be announced this evening on MPT's "Artworks This Week" program, include three $25,000 prizes decided on via a privately juried process. In addition, five "Baltimore's Choice" awards of $1,000 each will be handed out. Those awards were voted on by visitors to the Baker Web site. "These awards are an opportunity for individual artists in the region to be recognized for their incredible works," said J. Buck Jabaily, executive director of the nonprofit Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance, which administers the awards for the Baker fund.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 2, 1994
Local artist Amalie Rothschild criticized the Baltimore Museum of Art for its "blatant rejection and exclusion" of local artists at an arts forum Wednesday night."
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | March 17, 1991
Rick O'Daniel opens his mouth and out comes the most amazing sentence: "My cat looks like a Holstein," he says.You can't help yourself. "A Holstein?" you blurt out, maybe a little too loudly."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1996
The work of three local artists will be featured Sunday at a show and charity fund-raiser at the Annapolis Art Gallery.The artists -- Allen Board, Neil Harpe and Richard Harryman -- will be on hand to meet prospective buyers and talk about their work, show organizer Dana Stokes said."
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 1997
FOR SOME years now, we've been able to buy prescription drugs at the supermarket and have coffee in a bookstore.Now, Piccolo's restaurant in Columbia is highlighting the talents of local artists in its new dining addition.The first exhibit, titled, "Nine Women Artists," features a number of local names.Joan Bevelaqua, Ann Aves Martin, Rhonda Schonwald and Sharon Clements are Savage Mill studio artists.Mary Jo Tydlacka hails from Ellicott City.Nichole Hickey, Claudia Lafuse and Sue Anne Bottomley live in Columbia, and ceramic sculptor Tatiana lives in Glenelg.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 1996
WORKS BY TWO local artists will be featured in an exhibit titled "Outside/Inside" starting tomorrow at the Slayton House Gallery.Wilde Lake resident Sue Anne Bottomley will display 4-foot-long panoramic drawings of Wilde Lake and Hyla Brook Road, as well as drawings of Howard County farmland.She will also show 10 relief prints she created using a technique she invented, called "stenocut.""It's a variation on linocuts," she said, but uses inexpensive materials. "The technique is safe and suitable for people of all ages," she added.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
One year ago, Ellen Lunay and Amy Fresty would get confused looks when they described the concept of their new business. The neighbors from Arnold were looking for a short-term lease in a commercial building - a couple of weeks at most - to operate a boutique featuring local artists and trendy clothes. Once they finally found a landlord willing to lease space to them, HERE., a pop-up shop, was born. Lunay and Fresty filled a vacant space on Spa Road in Annapolis with jewelry, home goods, artwork and clothes from 20 artists and designers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 4, 2013
Ceramic artist Brian Beckenheimer admits that after owning As the Wheel Turns, a store in Harborplace for 27 years, and doing art shows for 34 years, "I was totally burned out. " He sold his house in Owings Mills last year and took the year off, moving to Arizona to be with his grown daughter, a hairstylist, and doing no pottery. Eight months later, he reconsidered. "I just got so bored with doing nothing," said Beckenheimer, 57, who now lives in Mount Washington and rents studio space with several kilns in a Woodberry-area warehouse that also houses several cabinetmakers and an architectural model maker.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Spend a summer evening at Fine Wine Friday, Aug. 2 from 6:30 to 7 p.m. at historic Snow Hill Manor, 13301 Laurel Bowie Road. Listen to music by local artists, enjoy refreshments and an informative reception. Wines are from Serpent Ridge Vineyard. Cost is $25 per person. Attendees must be age 21 and older. Pre-registration suggested; call 301-249-2004.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
For years, it has baffled and frustrated me that Baltimore, the home of Maryland Institute College of Art s, one of the country's premier schools of art and design, is a city with so few professional opportunities for artists. We virtually force our professional artists to look for job prospects and commissions in Philadelphia, New York and on the West Coast. With few commercial galleries and only a small pool of patrons interested in contemporary and emerging artists, Baltimore is uniquely positioned as an "artsy" city where artists produce high quality work for its own sake rather than for the marketplace.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
All it took was a tour of the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown and the seventh-grade students at Temple Emanuel Religious School were in. How could they convert a place of sadness - a shelter for animals that had lost the homes and families they once knew - into a place where happiness can begin again with the adoption of an abandoned pet? Paint a mural. Baltimore artist Jay Wolf Schlossberg-Cohen, whose daughter attends Temple Emanuel and who is known for community mural projects, worked with the students to craft a message, convert that message to drawings and, eventually, to murals on the wall space around the building where the animals wait.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | May 18, 1995
Whether it rains or shines this weekend, local activities will give us all a chance to enjoy a great weekend.Glenwood's Therapeutic and Recreational Riding Center presents "Art and Music in the Meadows" beginning at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. With County Executive Charles I. Ecker as an auctioneer, you'll have a chance to bid on wonderful works of art by local artists. Glenelg High School's jazz band, under the direction of Barry Enzman, will perform during the preview, when you can view the art and chat with the artists while enjoying a wine and cheese reception.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 1999
BARBARA SCHNELL of Hampstead and Suzanne Mancha of Manchester will be featured in the railway car artist's studio, part of the national Artrain museum.The Artrain will be open at the Maryland Midland Railway tracks in Taneytown from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow through Sunday. The studio will be open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.Schnell, a children's art educator, will paint a pastel portrait of Taneytown Mayor Henry C. Heine tomorrow morning, and return for another portrait Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Nicki Minaj wanted a cell phone case that matched her larger-than-life look - something cartoonish, with bright colors. So last year, the pop star turned to Tristan Herbert, a 23-year-old Parkville artist who makes custom covers for iPhones and Androids. Herbert spent 11 hours designing a case with a drawing of Minaj sporting long blonde hair, big hoop earrings, a belly shirt and blazer. The words "Pink Friday," the title of Minaj's first album, run alongside, and the background is, of course, pink.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Baltimore has been enveloped for weeks in a deep purple hue - figuratively at the very least, often literally - and this all-Ravens-all-the-time stimulation was bound to rub off on the arts community. Local artists have been expressing their enthusiasm for the Ravens throughout the football season with freshly created works, including pop-up images on downtown streets and murals in private homes. "It's pretty natural for artists to get excited about something going on in popular culture," said Jenny Carson, chair of the art history department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Artists who tackle sports subjects do not necessarily get their rah-rahs out by doing portraits of popular athletes or incorporating team logos.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.