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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | April 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Unable to agree on taxes, Maryland lawmakers shifted their attention back to the state budget yesterday, hoping they can at least get that approved before the 90-day session expires at midnight Monday.But even that effort fell apart last night.House and Senate conferees on the budget abruptly decided there was no sense in meeting because the House wanted nearly $50 million in appropriations for expanded local aid programs, while the Senate conferees did not.The aid would include a $30 million grant to Baltimore and five poor rural counties, and would provide $17 million to finance educational placements for disabled students.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
OCEAN CITY — Gubernatorial candidates of both parties promised city and town officials that they would restore local road repair money cut from the state budget by the O'Malley administration. Appearing at the annual convention of the Maryland Municipal League two weeks before the June 24 primary, Democrat Anthony G. Brown and four Republican candidates pledged full restoration of the transportation spending known as "highway user revenue. " That spending was cut back as much as 95 percent by Gov. Martin O'Malley during the recession as the governor chose to shield other spending priorities from deep cuts.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
As Maryland's budget gap grows, so too do election-year promises from gubernatorial candidates about what they won't cut. Democrat Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. pledged yesterday not to reduce state money distributed to cities and towns despite a projected $1.7 billion budget shortfall that legislators must close by the spring. The candidates made the promise at yesterday's fall conference of the Maryland Municipal League, an association of 157 localities.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
It's a given that politicians like to spend money but they don't like to raise taxes. After all, the former makes them popular with their constituents and the latter has the opposite effect. Rarely is this more evident than in an election year. Marylanders may want to keep that in mind if they're bewildered by how less than one year after the General Assembly approved a major gas tax increase, lawmakers are back debating whether to raise transportation-related taxes again. To the outsider, it has the look of a pack of ravenous wolves squabbling over a recent kill while eyeing a deer across the meadow rather than being satisfied with the bounty before them.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 11, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer, forced to slash spending for the sixth time in 15 months, recommended yesterday unpaid furloughs for state workers as well as deep new cuts in local aid and ordered state agency budgets to be squeezed again.Legislative leaders generally disapproved of the plan, but were virtually paralyzed by indecision and could not agree on anything to suggest in its place."This is reality," Mr. Schaefer said, referring to his legal responsibility to eliminate the $225 million deficit that developed in the two months since he and the legislature trimmed $446 million.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 24, 2010
State Republican lawmakers recommended deep cuts to education, state government and local aid Tuesday afternoon at a rare joint Senate and House hearing called by Democratic leaders to blunt criticism that they had excluded the minority party from the budget process. The exercise blended election year partisanship with an earnest effort by some members to trim fat from the state's $13 billion general fund budget for next year. It also revealed the challenges all lawmakers face when dealing with plummeting revenues: The GOP offered two plans, both relying on federal stimulus dollars, but one fails to specify how spending reductions would be maintained beyond the current year.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
Rep. Helen Delich Bentley wants to cut one of Baltimore's most lucrative sources of state aid -- the money set aside for street repair and other transportation-related programs.The Republican candidate for governor said this week that the city should receive a smaller proportion of the money disbursed to local jurisdictions from Maryland's Consolidated Transportation Trust Fund. Under the current formula, Baltimore gets about $152 million annually."I think it should be pared down some," Mrs. Bentley said at a debate Monday in response to a question on the local aid formula.
NEWS
December 11, 1991
Round No. 6 of Maryland's emergency budget-cutting drama brought howls of anguish yesterday from county executives and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. And for good reason. Taking another $143 million out of local aid -- after earlier reductions of $230 million -- will force substantial reductions in county and city social programs. More layoffs seem inevitable.Can this painful step be avoided? Only if state legislators resign themselves to raising taxes. That isn't likely, given the adamant refusal of House leaders -- especially Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell -- even to consider a sizable tax increase.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
SOLOMONS -- Gov. Parris N. Glendening tried last night to reassure nervous local officials that his proposed income tax cut and spending initiatives will not force a reduction in aid to local governments.Rather, he told a gathering of the Maryland Association of Counties, state aid to local governments will continue to grow as expected despite the drop in state revenue."Under our fiscal plan, local aid will increase more than 5 percent annually over the next three years," Glendening said.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | April 5, 1991
The city Senate delegation is backing a bill that some of its members think could change the way Maryland tax dollars are apportioned, and help poorer jurisdictions such as Baltimore.The bill technically would appropriate $11.4 million that already was in the budget passed this week for local jurisdictions, including $9.8 million for Baltimore.The language in the bill would establish a formula that takes into account population and the amount of tax revenue raised by the local jurisdiction.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
The Volvo Group is expanding its 1,340-worker Hagerstown plant and plans to add more than 100 jobs there, the company announced Friday. Volvo, which makes heavy-duty engines and transmissions at the facility, anticipates a $30 million expansion. The company is upgrading the plant, centralizing some warehousing efforts and bringing back work - machining and assembly operations for Mack heavy-duty drive axles - that was handled in Hagerstown years ago but had been moved to a third-party supplier in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The House Democratic leadership is expected to meet Wednesday in Annapolis to discuss a proposed special session to expand gambling in Maryland. A spokeswoman for House SpeakerMichael E. Busch confirmed that senior House leaders and key delegation chairs will meet at 4 p.m. The gathering could be crucial to any decision to call a special session. Busch is believed to be trying to round up the votes it would take to pass a gambling expansion in the House, which so far has been the obstacle to a deal that would allow a casino inPrince George's Countyin exchange for permitting table games there and at the five already approved sites.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 24, 2010
State Republican lawmakers recommended deep cuts to education, state government and local aid Tuesday afternoon at a rare joint Senate and House hearing called by Democratic leaders to blunt criticism that they had excluded the minority party from the budget process. The exercise blended election year partisanship with an earnest effort by some members to trim fat from the state's $13 billion general fund budget for next year. It also revealed the challenges all lawmakers face when dealing with plummeting revenues: The GOP offered two plans, both relying on federal stimulus dollars, but one fails to specify how spending reductions would be maintained beyond the current year.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
Most parents of young children and education advocates may have breathed a sigh of relief last week. The House of Delegates approved a budget that was relatively kind to K-12 public schools, and the Senate may be convinced to do the same. But in the next few days, the outlook could change substantially. That's because this Wednesday is the deadline for local governments to apply for a waiver of maintenance of effort - a state law requiring them to spend as much on public schools on a per pupil basis as they did the year before.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | March 12, 2009
Legislative leaders, saddled with a new budget hole of $516 million and a deadline for balancing the budget, said yesterday that they might resort to additional furloughs for state workers and slashing aid to local governments that have largely been spared in previous rounds of spending cuts. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch laid out some budgetary options yesterday as the state's revenue forecasters officially reported that they now anticipate more than $1.1 billion less in tax revenue during the next 16 months.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
OCEAN CITY -- Taking little comfort in Gov. Martin O'Malley's promises not to balance the state budget by shifting costs to cities and counties, local leaders are bracing for a fight to stop "doomsday" proposals that could saddle them with as much as $646 million in cuts. The executives, commissioners and other officials at the Maryland Association of Counties convention here say the prospect that the state will slough off hundreds of millions in costs for teacher pensions on local governments at the same time that it cuts grants for public safety and other services is the No. 1 topic of conversation.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer Staff writers Peter Jensen and Michael Fletcher contributed to this article | September 24, 1992
Any hope for easy agreement on Gov. William Donal Schaefer's proposed budget cuts vanished yesterday as local government leaders balked, saying it's unfair to cut $150 million in aid to Baltimore and the 23 counties.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the executives of the state's six most populous counties met with representatives of the Maryland Association of Counties yesterday morning and emerged with an agreement to fight Mr. Schaefer's proposal."We are not acquiescing to the $150 million cut at all. To do so would open us to major cuts in the future," said Parris Glendening, the Prince George's County Executive.
NEWS
September 25, 1992
It's time for Gov. William Donald Schaefer and leaders of the Big Seven subdivisions to stop their blustering and start slashing $450 million from the state budget in a pragmatic and cooperative manner. Such massive cutbacks are going to hurt, no matter what programs are affected. And the pain will be felt by thousands of Maryland citizens, regardless of whether a state or a local program is impacted.Yet county leaders are taking the unyielding position that they won't go along with the governor's suggestion of $150 million in local aid reductions (plus another $24 million in indirect local cuts)
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Despite Gov. Martin O'Malley's pledge to spare local governments, legislative leaders say cuts in aid to counties and cities will likely have to be part of the state's effort to resolve its $1.5 billion budget shortfall. The governor, a former mayor, managed to avoid such cuts in the $213 million worth of proposed spending reductions he publicly unveiled yesterday, and he reiterated his desire to preserve the money the state passes on to local governments for education, public safety and other services.
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