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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | December 20, 2006
The port of Baltimore's largest longshoremen's union elected a slate of longtime members this week to leadership positions, a move that will mark the end of a sometimes fractious year-and-a-half under outside control. It was one of the highest turnouts ever for Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association, with about 700 of the 1,000 members voting late Monday. They chose 37-year waterfront veteran Kermit Bowling as president. Also elected were John Blom and Ronald Barkhorn, each with 25 years or more in the local union, as vice president and walking delegate respectively.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 3, 2006
Theresa Harden can still drive tractors all day, but at 61 years old, the longshoreman has a tough time crawling on her hands and knees in the belly of a cargo ship, a task that port of Baltimore workers do to help secure freight. "I can't do it," she said recently. For many years, Harden and other workers who were older, weaker or battered from years on the job relied on their seniority at Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Work rules allowed them a day's pay for jobs they could comfortably do. But many workers say such rules have been eroded in the nearly 18 months since their New York-based union stepped into local affairs, pointing to financial and other irregularities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The dueling complaints by two port of Baltimore union officials alleging the other assaulted him now will be considered by residents of Baltimore, after their attorneys requested a jury trial in the case. Maryland District Court Judge Timothy D. Murphy approved the requests Tuesday. Riker "Rocky" McKenzie, president of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, filed a complaint on Nov. 8 alleging the union's then-secretary-treasurer, Daryl Wilburn, assaulted him during an altercation that morning at the local's Locust Point union hall.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
The pigeons fly around inside at 900 Oldham St. Old gum and puddles of stale soda stick to your shoes, and when the hall fills up with people, a milky blanket of cigarette smoke clings to the ceiling. There's only one place in Baltimore that Tim Sansone would rather be: on the waterfront, making money. Sansone is a Longshoreman. He has 18 years of seniority -- a baby on the piers of the Patapsco River -- so if he wants to work he has to tool about the hiring hall of the International Longshoremen's Association, talking shop, smoking his cigarettes and waiting for the dispatchers to post the next job. "You sit in here all day sometimes, from 6 in the morning until midnight, and then only get four hours of work.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1998
The port of Baltimore's largest Longshoremen's local is preparing to admit its first new members in almost 20 years, a move made necessary by its older work force and a logjam of cargo on certain days of the week.The International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 in Locust Point, which represents cargo handlers, will vote Jan. 5 on whether to admit 50 new members. The local has about 700 workers, whose average age is over 55.Local 333 last admitted new members in the late 1970s, then closed its membership rolls as cargo handling became increasingly automated and the number of merchant ships calling in Baltimore dropped.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
IF THE port of Baltimore loses the chance to become a hub for the world's largest "roll-on/ roll-off" shipping line, you can thank rank and file members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Four other ILA locals here approved work-rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which carries more autos, farm equipment and heavy machinery than any of its competitors. But not Local 333, which resoundingly rebuffed the deal. That jeopardizes a 10-year contract with WWL that was expected to lead to a tripling of the line's Baltimore business.
NEWS
By David Conn | December 5, 1990
The agreement yesterday afternoon between port management and the union clerks ended a two-day job action that marked the first time in a decade that members of one longshoremen's local had refused to honor another's strike.But few ships were diverted from Baltimore because of the strike, and shipping officials said they suffered minimal economic damage as few containers were left stranded on the piers. More difficult to gauge was the long-term impact on the port's reputation of yet another dockworkers strike in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | February 11, 1992
Joseph M. Kowaleviocz, a former union official who accused the biggest dockworkers local in the port of Baltimore of trying to quiet his criticism by illegally suspending him in 1985, has won a $153,000 judgment in federal court.In addition to the judgment against Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association, Mr. Kowaleviocz was awarded $10,000 in damages from Edward Howell, president of the local at the time of his suspension from the union.The judgments resulted from a trial before Judge Frederic N. Smalkin.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | February 11, 1992
Joseph M. Kowaleviocz, a former union official who accused the biggest dockworkers local in the port of Baltimore of trying to quiet his criticism by illegally suspending him in 1985, has won a $153,000 judgment in federal court.In addition to the judgment against Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association, Mr. Kowaleviocz was awarded $10,000 in damages from Edward Howell, president of the local at the time of his suspension from the union.The award, granted Friday by a U.S. District Court jury in Baltimore, could have severe economic consequences for Local 333. With about 1,250 members, the local represents a majority of the approximately 2,000 ILA dockworkers in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
A third-generation dockworker from Baltimore was elected president of the International Longshoremen's Association yesterday - the largest union of port workers in North America. Richard P. Hughes Jr., who had been executive vice president of the New York-based union since 2005, replaces John Bowers, who held the post for two decades. The 73-year-old Hughes - the first Longshoreman from Baltimore to hold the top post - was selected in a voice vote at the ILA's quadrennial convention in Florida.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | December 20, 2006
The port of Baltimore's largest longshoremen's union elected a slate of longtime members this week to leadership positions, a move that will mark the end of a sometimes fractious year-and-a-half under outside control. It was one of the highest turnouts ever for Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association, with about 700 of the 1,000 members voting late Monday. They chose 37-year waterfront veteran Kermit Bowling as president. Also elected were John Blom and Ronald Barkhorn, each with 25 years or more in the local union, as vice president and walking delegate respectively.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 3, 2006
Theresa Harden can still drive tractors all day, but at 61 years old, the longshoreman has a tough time crawling on her hands and knees in the belly of a cargo ship, a task that port of Baltimore workers do to help secure freight. "I can't do it," she said recently. For many years, Harden and other workers who were older, weaker or battered from years on the job relied on their seniority at Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Work rules allowed them a day's pay for jobs they could comfortably do. But many workers say such rules have been eroded in the nearly 18 months since their New York-based union stepped into local affairs, pointing to financial and other irregularities.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
Leaders of three Longshoremen's locals think they might have enough votes to win approval for a key contract with the port of Baltimore's largest shipping line, possibly paving the way for the development of a new cargo hub in the city. The news comes one week after members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association voted 235-189 to reject the contract addendum, leaving port officials worried that Scandinavian steamship company Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines might reject Baltimore as the site of its proposed East Coast cargo hub. Members of Local 1429 of the ILA will vote today to decide whether to accept work rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen, which has made the union concessions a cornerstone of its proposed expansion in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
IF THE port of Baltimore loses the chance to become a hub for the world's largest "roll-on/ roll-off" shipping line, you can thank rank and file members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Four other ILA locals here approved work-rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which carries more autos, farm equipment and heavy machinery than any of its competitors. But not Local 333, which resoundingly rebuffed the deal. That jeopardizes a 10-year contract with WWL that was expected to lead to a tripling of the line's Baltimore business.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
The pigeons fly around inside at 900 Oldham St. Old gum and puddles of stale soda stick to your shoes, and when the hall fills up with people, a milky blanket of cigarette smoke clings to the ceiling. There's only one place in Baltimore that Tim Sansone would rather be: on the waterfront, making money. Sansone is a Longshoreman. He has 18 years of seniority -- a baby on the piers of the Patapsco River -- so if he wants to work he has to tool about the hiring hall of the International Longshoremen's Association, talking shop, smoking his cigarettes and waiting for the dispatchers to post the next job. "You sit in here all day sometimes, from 6 in the morning until midnight, and then only get four hours of work.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 29, 1990
The members of the largest dockworkers local in Baltimore endorsed last night their leaders' decision to reject management's "final" local contract offer.In a voice vote at the union hiring hall in East Baltimore, about 400 members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association overwhelmingly backed their leaders' decision, made Tuesday.James Williams, a Local 333 member who has worked about 16 years on the docks, said after the meeting that unless management revises its offer, he and his fellow workers are ready to strike when the contract expires tomorrow at midnight.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
With difficult contract negotiations ahead in 1996, cargo handlers at the Port of Baltimore have elected a veteran dockworker and former union leader to head the port's largest longshoremen's local.By a 100-vote margin, members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association chose Bill Schonowski in all-day election Wednesday.Mr. Schonowski, who has worked as a longshoreman for nearly 40 years, ousted Matty Capp, a less-experienced union leader who rose to the $70,000-a-year president's post nearly two years ago by filling the unexpired term of Ed Berke.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
The largest shipping line in the port of Baltimore has threatened to abandon plans for a new cargo hub in the city and begin negotiations with competing ports, blaming local Longshoremen for being "noncompetitive." The Scandinavian shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which wants to consolidate much of its East Coast cargo in Baltimore, said it can't commit to expanding here if the union of cargo handlers doesn't agree to more flexible work hours and job duties. The largest local of the Longshoremen's union has refused, rejecting a contract change offered by the company this month.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
After years of relative solidarity among Baltimore's Longshoremen, a group of dockworkers trying to draw new business to the port is threatening to spark a labor war on the city's waterfront.They have formed a new unit, or local, of the national Longshoremen's union and promised to work for less money.The group wants primarily to load and unload steel, a cargo once plentiful in the city but now shipped mostly through competing ports with cheaper labor.Its leader will be the former head of a current dockworkers' local who was ousted after asking his workers to take pay cuts to bring the steel back.
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