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By Winifred Walsh | January 26, 1991
GOLDEN STAR CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTAURANT 3326-30 Greenmount Ave. Open 11 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. daily, noon to 2:30 a.m. Sunday. Phone: 366-7932.This friendly neighborhood favorite is one of the relatively few places in Baltimore where patrons can go for late-night feasting. And everything on the extensive menu is available for carryout. The restaurant -- with soothing aquarium insets -- has been operated for 21 years by the Lin family and their relatives. All foods except the breads are homemade, and the food is good and the prices moderate.
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NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 28, 2007
The eating-out crowd has a new attraction at the Inner Harbor. P.F. Chang's China Bistro has opened in the new Lockwood Place building on Pratt Street. It's the first in Baltimore and the third in Maryland, according to the chain's Web site. The other two are in Columbia and Bethesda. Operating partner David Moss, who's worked at four other East Coast P.F. Chang's, says that those familiar with the restaurant may notice a couple of differences in Baltimore's. He says there have been complaints at others about the noise level, so extra effort was made here to cut down on that.
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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2002
There's something endearing about the humble China Wok restaurant in White Marsh Plaza. Maybe it's the "Chopstick Hall of Fame" that holds regulars' chopsticks in pretty plastic cases. Whatever it is, the little outpost in the heart of sweltering suburbia does a fine job serving good, fresh Chinese food. China Wok occupies a storefront in a large shopping center, near a Giant grocery store and just across from the White Marsh Mall. Inside, a bamboo curtain fills the front window and a dozen tables and a small sushi bar are wedged into the space.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 19, 2006
If you've driven around Padonia and York roads lately, you may have noticed a new face on the corner. Rib 'N Reef has taken the spot vacated last November by Gibby's. John Bartsocas, who bought the space with his nephews George Tragas and Pete Vavaroutsosos, says while you won't find steamed crabs on the menu, there's plenty of other seafood to choose from. And then some. The menu is extensive. Let's start with the appetizers. They include crab imperial ($11.95); ahi tuna wrapped in nori and panko, flash-fried and served with a warm sake dipping sauce ($9.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | November 11, 1999
Enotria, a new Italian restaurant near Bel Air, is named for what the ancient Greeks called the rich grape-growing region of southern Italy. The word means "land of wine."Wine bottles in a neat row serve as a partition between booths inside the restaurant, which is decorated with fabulous stonework and interesting lighting treatments. The look Enotria is going after is that of a winery in Tuscany.But for all the emphasis on wine, we were surprised that the restaurant was out of our first three choices on the wine list, and our waitress was not much help assisting us in picking a fourth.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 28, 2007
The eating-out crowd has a new attraction at the Inner Harbor. P.F. Chang's China Bistro has opened in the new Lockwood Place building on Pratt Street. It's the first in Baltimore and the third in Maryland, according to the chain's Web site. The other two are in Columbia and Bethesda. Operating partner David Moss, who's worked at four other East Coast P.F. Chang's, says that those familiar with the restaurant may notice a couple of differences in Baltimore's. He says there have been complaints at others about the noise level, so extra effort was made here to cut down on that.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2001
Busy Dobbin Center has a busy Chinese restaurant, Wok 175, tucked behind the fast-food joints. "We've owned Wok 175 since 1991 - about three years after it opened," owner Billy Wong said. Wok 175 brings decades of experience in cooking Chinese cuisine, according to Wong. "Our head chef is my father-in-law," he said. "He's been a chef for 40 years - 30 of which in Columbia restaurants." According to Wong, the restaurant serves Americanized Mandarin-style food and a variety of dishes in other styles.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 16, 1993
Raphael's, 411 S. High St., (410) 727-4235. Open every day for lunch and dinner. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: appetizers, $5.75-$8.75; entrees, $10.25-$17.75.Raphael's has just about everything going for it.It has a great location. (Sure, there's a lot of competition in Little Italy, but restaurant owners say it just brings more people to the neighborhood. There are plenty of customers to go around.)It has history. Raphael Nini first opened a restaurant at this same address in 1946.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 28, 1998
If you could eat only one more meal, would it be lobster, the favored crustacean of New England, or would it be crab, the reigning crustacean of the Mid-Atlantic? I put that question to Jasper White the other day.At first glance, the odds favored White to pick lobster. He is a New England resident and a noted chef in the Boston area. Anyone with that kind of background has learned to venerate the lobster and its loyal legions. Moreover, White has just written a cookbook, "Lobster at Home" (Scribner, $30)
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 19, 2006
If you've driven around Padonia and York roads lately, you may have noticed a new face on the corner. Rib 'N Reef has taken the spot vacated last November by Gibby's. John Bartsocas, who bought the space with his nephews George Tragas and Pete Vavaroutsosos, says while you won't find steamed crabs on the menu, there's plenty of other seafood to choose from. And then some. The menu is extensive. Let's start with the appetizers. They include crab imperial ($11.95); ahi tuna wrapped in nori and panko, flash-fried and served with a warm sake dipping sauce ($9.95)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2002
There's something endearing about the humble China Wok restaurant in White Marsh Plaza. Maybe it's the "Chopstick Hall of Fame" that holds regulars' chopsticks in pretty plastic cases. Whatever it is, the little outpost in the heart of sweltering suburbia does a fine job serving good, fresh Chinese food. China Wok occupies a storefront in a large shopping center, near a Giant grocery store and just across from the White Marsh Mall. Inside, a bamboo curtain fills the front window and a dozen tables and a small sushi bar are wedged into the space.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2001
Busy Dobbin Center has a busy Chinese restaurant, Wok 175, tucked behind the fast-food joints. "We've owned Wok 175 since 1991 - about three years after it opened," owner Billy Wong said. Wok 175 brings decades of experience in cooking Chinese cuisine, according to Wong. "Our head chef is my father-in-law," he said. "He's been a chef for 40 years - 30 of which in Columbia restaurants." According to Wong, the restaurant serves Americanized Mandarin-style food and a variety of dishes in other styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | November 11, 1999
Enotria, a new Italian restaurant near Bel Air, is named for what the ancient Greeks called the rich grape-growing region of southern Italy. The word means "land of wine."Wine bottles in a neat row serve as a partition between booths inside the restaurant, which is decorated with fabulous stonework and interesting lighting treatments. The look Enotria is going after is that of a winery in Tuscany.But for all the emphasis on wine, we were surprised that the restaurant was out of our first three choices on the wine list, and our waitress was not much help assisting us in picking a fourth.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 28, 1998
If you could eat only one more meal, would it be lobster, the favored crustacean of New England, or would it be crab, the reigning crustacean of the Mid-Atlantic? I put that question to Jasper White the other day.At first glance, the odds favored White to pick lobster. He is a New England resident and a noted chef in the Boston area. Anyone with that kind of background has learned to venerate the lobster and its loyal legions. Moreover, White has just written a cookbook, "Lobster at Home" (Scribner, $30)
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 16, 1993
Raphael's, 411 S. High St., (410) 727-4235. Open every day for lunch and dinner. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: appetizers, $5.75-$8.75; entrees, $10.25-$17.75.Raphael's has just about everything going for it.It has a great location. (Sure, there's a lot of competition in Little Italy, but restaurant owners say it just brings more people to the neighborhood. There are plenty of customers to go around.)It has history. Raphael Nini first opened a restaurant at this same address in 1946.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh | January 26, 1991
GOLDEN STAR CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTAURANT 3326-30 Greenmount Ave. Open 11 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. daily, noon to 2:30 a.m. Sunday. Phone: 366-7932.This friendly neighborhood favorite is one of the relatively few places in Baltimore where patrons can go for late-night feasting. And everything on the extensive menu is available for carryout. The restaurant -- with soothing aquarium insets -- has been operated for 21 years by the Lin family and their relatives. All foods except the breads are homemade, and the food is good and the prices moderate.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | February 6, 1993
Vaccaro's italian pastry shopVaccaro's Italian Pastry Shop, 222 Albemarle St., (410) 685-4905; Cafe Madeira, 1623 Thames St., (410) 675-7105. If you're interested in something sweet with gourmet coffee, stop in at one of Baltimore's dessert cafes. Vaccaro's and Cafe Madeira are very different in style: The former is big business, with a pretty shop in Little Italy and branches in the malls. It has wonderful ice cream desserts and a lovely assortment of cookies. The pastries interested me less.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | August 22, 1992
Hing WahSuite 101, 212 S. Bond St., Bel Air.Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays,11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.(410) 879-8883. Cheap lunchtime specials first wooed me inside this Chinese restaurant and carryout. Super service and an extensive menu keep me, and lots of other Bel Air office workers, coming back.Shrimp with lobster sauce and pork fried rice is only $4.95 at lunchtime. Other dishes, such as chicken chow mein, cost even less at $3.95. Lunch box specials are available Mondays to Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.Warning: If you don't like it hot, say so before ordering.
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