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NEWS
April 27, 1992
A 44-year-old Severn woman was robbed and assaulted by a man and twowomen after she refused to buy one of them a loaf of bread Saturday morning, county police said.The woman was attacked and robbed of $30 by the man during a confrontation around 8 a.m. at a home in the the 1800 block of Meade Village Road, police said.After the first attack, two women followed the robbery victim to her nearby home and attacked her again, police said.The woman wastaken to North Arundel Hospital for treatment of injuries sustained in the beating.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 29, 2006
Dr. Louis Haberer Tankin, a retired Baltimore urologist who wrote of his experiences as a prisoner of war during World War II, died from complications of a stroke Thursday at Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center. The Pikesville resident was 92. Dr. Tankin was born in Baltimore and raised on Milton Avenue near Patterson Park. As the son of a surgeon, he was from an early age interested in a medical career. "He didn't want to be a doctor for money or status. He wanted to be a doctor because he loved and wanted to help people," said a son, Alan C. Tankin of Newburg, Mo. He was a 1932 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1936.
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FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 9, 1999
* Item: Pillsbury Homestyle Loaf* What you get: One 9-by-5-inch loaf of bread* Cost: About $1.79* Preparation time: 50 to 60 minutes* Review: Although the hourlong prep time might seem daunting, keep in mind how long it takes to make bread from scratch (or even with a bread machine) when you buy Pillsbury's newest refrigerated dough. Suddenly, an hour for fresh bread doesn't seem like such a long wait. The dough is easy to use: Pop it out of the tube into a greased loaf pan and right into the oven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
It's no mystery why Amicci's has been so popular for so long. Open a restaurant with good, basic Italian food served in heaping portions and at reasonable prices, and people will come. This Little Italy stalwart has changed quite a bit since it opened in 1990. Back then, it had 43 seats and a casual, sandwich-driven menu. Today, with a new dining area that opened in May, the restaurant seats 220, and the menu is mostly Italian entrees like lasagna, chicken parm and shrimp scampi, plus several pasta vegetarian dishes.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | May 30, 2001
Item: Manishewitz Vegetable Kishka Mix What you get: 12 two-inch slices Cost: About $4 Nutritional content: 110 calories, 1.5 grams fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 480 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 40 minutes rolled and baked in oven, 15 to 20 minutes cooked loose on stove top Review: If you think instant mashed potatoes are an aberration and stuffing should be made only from a loaf of bread, don't bother with Manishewitz's instant kishka mix....
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 22, 1993
South of France--The first food I ate on my first visit to France was a loaf of bread, a bottle of wine and a hunk of cheese.The bread was a long, thin sourdough baguette with a crust that wouldn't quit. The wine was a simple $5 Beaujolais primeur, bottled by the man who grew the grapes, Maurice Protheau. The cheese was Camembert, made from unpasteurized milk, a style of cheesemaking common in France but rare in the United States.The bread was yeasty ecstasy. The wine was delightfully quenching.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | February 22, 1991
Most of the time John Paterakis is content to be inconspicuous, moving quietly yet effectively through the business day. Having his name in the newspaper, or calling a press conference, isn't his cup of tea, or in this instance, loaf of bread.All kinds of propositions come across his desk and it must take weeks to sort them out . . . those for rejection, the ones to talk about and the precious few he decides to pursue with intent. He's frequently mentioned as an important player in efforts to buy sports franchises but, to this point in his life, hasn't made a commitment to fun and games.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
Every year for as long as there's been a Howard County Fair, Elmira Seibert has been there.Most years, the blue-eyed 71-year-old won ribbons in sewing and cooking categories. She isn't certain what she won that first year in 1946, but her prize-winning 1947 exhibit is still around.That would be her son, Willis Seibert."He was one of the first articles I entered in the fair, under 'Healthy Baby,' " she said.She can't remember whether he got first or second place, but recalls that the judges thought "he just looked plump, but not overly fat."
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
Automatic bread makers started to appear in American kitchens in 1988. Last year Welbilt, which calls itself "the leader" in the market, sold more than 500,000 of them, and expects to do likewise this year.A couple of brands make not only the bread, but also the jelly to go with it, though not at the same time. (You do have to slice the bread and spread the jelly yourself.)Although it's still not an inexpensive item, bread makers have come down in price somewhat. In stores around Baltimore, they range from $150 to about $400, depending on what brand and model you buy and where you buy it. Catalog shoppers and those who patronize television shopping services will find prices even lower, said Kimberly Rawn, director of communications for the National Housewares Manufacturers Association in Chicago.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
When the children of Savage crave a piece of nickel candy, or when their parents need a loaf of bread, they often head for Pop's General Store on Baltimore Street.And "Pop" himself -- 72-year old Jake Croston -- is never hard to find, standing behind the counter of the minigrocery or sitting in his rocking chair chatting with customers."It's a little, down-home country store, where you get the hot gossip and the latest news and an ice cream and a soda with it," said Jan Arnold, a Savage resident.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 1, 2003
These days, the question isn't "Where in Baltimore can you get a good loaf of bread?" It's "Where can't you?" Even supermarket bakeries are turning out decent multigrain breads and baguettes freshly baked every hour. True bread lovers, though, are never satisfied. Hence the success of small "artisan" bakeries, where loaves are made using natural (read "expensive") ingredients and old-fashioned methods. You may pay double or triple the amount you would for an ordinary loaf, but if you love great bread, the cost is worth it. Whether you dream of the perfect brioche, sourdough that rivals San Francisco's or an herbed focaccia, you can find a local bakery that offers it. Here's our guide to some of the best: Atwater's, 529 E. Belvedere Ave., Govans, 410-323-2396 Made with organic milled flour, sourdough starter, sea salt and water, Ned Atwater's loaves define artisanal.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | May 30, 2001
Item: Manishewitz Vegetable Kishka Mix What you get: 12 two-inch slices Cost: About $4 Nutritional content: 110 calories, 1.5 grams fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 480 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 40 minutes rolled and baked in oven, 15 to 20 minutes cooked loose on stove top Review: If you think instant mashed potatoes are an aberration and stuffing should be made only from a loaf of bread, don't bother with Manishewitz's instant kishka mix....
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 14, 2001
I MADE SOME raisin bread recently. It wasn't very good, especially when compared to my grandmother's. She used to bake raisin bread on weekday afternoons. That was back in the 1960s in the Midwestern town of St. Joseph, Mo., where it seemed to me that all grandparents came from Ireland and where it was common for three generations to live in the same house. Her raisin bread was a treat. I remember arriving home after a hard day battling arithmetic and gerunds at school, and being lifted up by the sweet smell of baking bread.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 9, 1999
* Item: Pillsbury Homestyle Loaf* What you get: One 9-by-5-inch loaf of bread* Cost: About $1.79* Preparation time: 50 to 60 minutes* Review: Although the hourlong prep time might seem daunting, keep in mind how long it takes to make bread from scratch (or even with a bread machine) when you buy Pillsbury's newest refrigerated dough. Suddenly, an hour for fresh bread doesn't seem like such a long wait. The dough is easy to use: Pop it out of the tube into a greased loaf pan and right into the oven.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 8, 1998
I COMPARED NOTES on bread baking with a couple of pros recently. For almost an hour we discussed dough, flour and glazes, the finishes that are brushed on the top of loaves.As an amateur who bakes bread about twice a week, I didn't need to be sold on the joy of bread-making. So when this pair of professional bakers, one French and one Italian, came to town to promote their new book "Ultimate Bread" (DK Publishing, 1998, $25), I skipped over the "why-would- anyone-want-to-bake-bread" part of the interview.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
When the children of Savage crave a piece of nickel candy, or when their parents need a loaf of bread, they often head for Pop's General Store on Baltimore Street.And "Pop" himself -- 72-year old Jake Croston -- is never hard to find, standing behind the counter of the minigrocery or sitting in his rocking chair chatting with customers."It's a little, down-home country store, where you get the hot gossip and the latest news and an ice cream and a soda with it," said Jan Arnold, a Savage resident.
FEATURES
By Edward R. Blonz, Ph.D | December 4, 1991
Q: I live alone and am rarely able to use an entire loaf of bread before it turns stale. I have tried storing bread in the refrigerator but find that once I do that it never tastes the same. What is it about refrigeration that ruins bread?A: Bread turns stale as its starch undergoes a change in structure. Although stale bread has a dried-out appearance, a loss of moisture is not the complete explanation -- a loaf will even turn stale in a well-sealed, never-opened package. Temperature, it turns out, is the key.There are two main types of starch, or carbohydrate, in bread.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 8, 1998
I COMPARED NOTES on bread baking with a couple of pros recently. For almost an hour we discussed dough, flour and glazes, the finishes that are brushed on the top of loaves.As an amateur who bakes bread about twice a week, I didn't need to be sold on the joy of bread-making. So when this pair of professional bakers, one French and one Italian, came to town to promote their new book "Ultimate Bread" (DK Publishing, 1998, $25), I skipped over the "why-would- anyone-want-to-bake-bread" part of the interview.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 5, 1995
What could be more comforting in the middle of winter than a nice bowl of steaming soup? New York cookbook author Teresa Kennedy thinks nothing could be better -- or simpler -- than a meal of soup. Just add a glass of wine, a simple salad, and a nice crusty bread.Here's a recipe from her new book "Simple Soups" (Crown Trade Paperbacks, $12).Cabbage-Barley SoupServes 66 cups beef broth, homemade or canned2 cups shredded cabbage1 large onion, coarsely chopped1 garlic clove, peeled and pressed1/2 cup barley1/2 cup ketchupCombine all of the ingredients in a large saucepan.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
Every year for as long as there's been a Howard County Fair, Elmira Seibert has been there.Most years, the blue-eyed 71-year-old won ribbons in sewing and cooking categories. She isn't certain what she won that first year in 1946, but her prize-winning 1947 exhibit is still around.That would be her son, Willis Seibert."He was one of the first articles I entered in the fair, under 'Healthy Baby,' " she said.She can't remember whether he got first or second place, but recalls that the judges thought "he just looked plump, but not overly fat."
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