Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLoading Dock
IN THE NEWS

Loading Dock

NEWS
December 28, 1994
An Arnold youth was killed early Monday when his car struck a brick wall near a loading dock of the Jumpers Crossroads Shopping Center, county police said yesterday.Joseph Michael Ruth Jr., 16, of the 200 block of Divinity Lane was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after 12:30 a.m. Police said he was not wearing a seat belt when his 1984 Chevrolet Camaro slammed into the wall of the loading dock behind the Baby Super Store at Jumpers Hole road and Ritchie Highway. Mr. Ruth was driving at a high speed behind the shopping center when he apparently slammed on his brakes to avoid hitting the wall, police said.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 2, 1993
Nonprofit recycler accepting donationsThe Loading Dock, a nonprofit building supply recycler, will accept selected items from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Alpha Ridge LandfillRecycling Center in Marriottsville.The Loading Dock accepts latex paint, lumber, plumbing fixtures, doors, windows and other usable building materials to create affordable low-income housing in the community. Receipts for tax-deductible contributions are issued.Information: 728-DOCK.POLICE LOG* Glenwood: 14500 block of MacClintock Drive: A $25 black metal mailbox was destroyed Wednesday night or early Thursday.
NEWS
January 2, 1996
The Loading Dock, a nonprofit recycler of building materials, will be at Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday..It will accept lumber, plumbing fixtures, doors, windows and other usable building materials.Information: 728-DOCK.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
Useful building materials are being dumped in landfills, while groups that rehabilitate low-income housing scratch for supplies.The Carroll County Housing Coalition wants to intercept the unused materials, such as lumber, pipe and drywall, and wants a Baltimore organization to help.Members met last week to discuss hooking up with Loading Dock, a central Baltimore clearinghouse for unused building supplies.The coalition wants to direct non-profit housing groups to Loading Dock for low-cost building supplies to rehabilitate low-income housing in Carroll.
NEWS
By Tribune staff | January 7, 2011
On that frigid morning of Dec. 22, 1910, the men arrived at the windowless "hog house" and were met with an overwhelming firefighting challenge. The only way to attack the fire was to hop on a 4-foot-tall loading dock covered by a rickety wooden canopy, leaving them little space to maneuver, said Bill Cosgrove, a retired Chicago firefighter who recently wrote a book about the fire titled "Chicago's Forgotten Tragedy. "
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Fred Bohman took the leftovers from 16 1/2 years of working on his house to the Loading Dock yesterday.It took nearly an hour to transfer a sliding glass door, roofing shingles, miscellaneous hardware, pieces of lumber, particle board, tar paper, pipe and sheets of Formica from his van to the waiting 2 1/2 -ton truck with the Loading Dock logo.Mr. Bohman has finished a detached two-car garage, put new shingles on the roof, built a 12-by-16-foot storage shed and put a 16-by-20-foot deck on the house, always making sure he did work that would last.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
County drops bill for Sykesville on Spout Hill repairsCarroll commissioners ended a dispute with Sykesville about repairs to Spout Hill Road yesterday by agreeing to forgive a $6,700 debt they said the town owed the county.The debt was incurred in 1987 when the county made emergency repairs to the road, which has many potholes and connects Third Avenue to Main Street.Commissioner Julia W. Gouge suggested that the board drop the $6,700 bill. The vote was unanimous.The commissioners also voted to sign an agreement saying the county and town will split the cost for materials to repair the road, which again needs work, and that the costs will not exceed $5,000 each.
NEWS
By Photos by Kim Hairston and Photos by Kim Hairston,Sun photographer | February 12, 2007
Art Hongpong, the owner of Cold Fusion Ice Designs, is on a mission to sculpt ice carving into a cool sport. On a recent day when it was colder outside than in his workspace, he dragged a 300-pound block of ice onto a loading dock. Then, armed with tools such as a chain saw and a scraper, he designed a snowflake on request. "I don't do it for the money," he says. "I want this ice carving sport to be cool." The 29-year-old is the son of famed ice sculptor Vivat Hongpong.
NEWS
October 19, 1995
North Arundel Hospital is sponsoring Community Wheelchair Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.The hospital's environmental services department will clean and sanitize electronic and manual wheelchairs for area residents free of charge and also will check nuts and bolts and tighten loose ones.Each participant will receive a bottle of disinfectant and other free promotional items. No appointment is necessary. Wheelchairs should be brought to the loading dock near the home care department and the Renaissance Shoppe.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
So, that brown marble sink turned out to be a bad idea because it clashed with your purple bathroom walls. And the wooden kitchen cabinets have too many scratches, and you're sick of them.Thinking of throwing them away?Don't. Just drop them off at Alpha Ridge landfill in Howard County like scores of residents and companies do. Not only will you be disposing of unwanted materials, but you'll be helping low-income families.Since June 1991, workers from the Baltimore-based Loading Dock have salvaged 42 tons of homebuilding materials from the Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville to help provide and improve homes for low-income families, said Hope Cucina, the executive director for the non-profit recycling group.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.