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Lloyd Street Synagogue

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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2011
Archaeologists peeling back layers of history beneath the historic Lloyd Street Synagogue in East Baltimore have uncovered what is believed to be the oldest Jewish ritual bath complex in the United States. Hints of the presence of the 1845 bath, or "mikveh," were first detected during excavations in 2001. But further digging this winter has revealed about a quarter of a five-foot-deep wooden tub, and linked it to a related cistern found in 2008, and to remains of a brick hearth once used to warm the bath's water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gefilte fish, the beloved Jewish preparation of slow simmered ground fish, takes the front burner on Sunday at GefilteFest, a full day of cooking crafts, music and storytelling for the whole family at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Organized in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identify," GefilteFest will feature a visit from the folks of Gefilteria , a Brooklyn-N.Y.-based "purveyor of boutique gefilte Old Wold Jewish foods" and will culminate, at 2 p.m., in a "Gefilte Fish Throwdown," pitting Gefilteria's Liz Alpern against Wit & Wisdom 's Dave Whaley and Pikesville's own Susan Silbiger, for the chance to be crowned Gefilte Maven.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gefilte fish, the beloved Jewish preparation of slow simmered ground fish, takes the front burner on Sunday at GefilteFest, a full day of cooking crafts, music and storytelling for the whole family at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Organized in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identify," GefilteFest will feature a visit from the folks of Gefilteria , a Brooklyn-N.Y.-based "purveyor of boutique gefilte Old Wold Jewish foods" and will culminate, at 2 p.m., in a "Gefilte Fish Throwdown," pitting Gefilteria's Liz Alpern against Wit & Wisdom 's Dave Whaley and Pikesville's own Susan Silbiger, for the chance to be crowned Gefilte Maven.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Baltimore is one of the oldest cities in the United States, with a wealth of history and historical landmarks. It's amazing how the City Council thinks it owns those historic landmarks ("Ownership isn't the issue," April 4). How presumptuous of them to sell or lease the city's heritage to fill its coffers. A new low has been achieved in this city's politics with this idea. They seem to forget the people own the landmarks, not the City Council, not MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, Not the governor but the people.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose | eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Rabbi Abraham Rice arrived in East Baltimore 170 years ago from Europe, and over the weekend dozens of his descendants came here, too, to meet distant relatives and learn more about the first ordained rabbi to lead a congregation in the United States. The Rice family reunion gathered Sunday at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, which coincidentally is celebrating its 50th anniversary and the recent renovation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue, where Rabbi Rice served so long ago. Jewish immigrants began arriving in America in the 1650s, and by 1840 about 10,000 Jews lived in the country, said Deborah Weiner, research historian at the museum.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Baltimore is one of the oldest cities in the United States, with a wealth of history and historical landmarks. It's amazing how the City Council thinks it owns those historic landmarks ("Ownership isn't the issue," April 4). How presumptuous of them to sell or lease the city's heritage to fill its coffers. A new low has been achieved in this city's politics with this idea. They seem to forget the people own the landmarks, not the City Council, not MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, Not the governor but the people.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
Inside the Lloyd Street Synagogue, the third oldest Jewish synagogue building in the country, Emmy Mogelinsky, a purposeful woman with a strong carriage and face, asks a group of mostly black middle school students if they have ever heard of the Holocaust.Hands do not go up. "It is a period in Germany when Hitler did his darnedest to wipe out all the Jews. All of them!" she explains.Mrs. Mogelinsky, a Holocaust survivor herself, gives a passionate thumbnail sketch of the Third Reich. It was "supposed to last 1,000 years.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
It was one of the odder combos of the Second World War: The young rabbinical student alongside the German secretary to the Japanese consul in Lithuania, both stamping the passports of thousands of Jews with visas to an uncertain future.Such was the state of Europe in July 1940 -- that a frightened and unknown Jewish boy could show up at a foreign diplomat's office and wind up processing visas the same day. Most of the other consulates in Lithuania -- which had just been taken over by the Russians -- had shut down.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 4, 1996
American cities have become increasingly crowded with buildings that offer "more of the same" -- architectural additions that resemble the structures to which they are attached so much that it's nearly impossible to tell what is original and what has been added.It can be far more difficult for an architect and client to design a building that grows out of its surroundings but contributes a new dimension.That's what the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has done with the design of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a $2.25 million history and education center for which ground will be broken tomorrow at Lloyd and Watson streets in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2011
Archaeologists peeling back layers of history beneath the historic Lloyd Street Synagogue in East Baltimore have uncovered what is believed to be the oldest Jewish ritual bath complex in the United States. Hints of the presence of the 1845 bath, or "mikveh," were first detected during excavations in 2001. But further digging this winter has revealed about a quarter of a five-foot-deep wooden tub, and linked it to a related cistern found in 2008, and to remains of a brick hearth once used to warm the bath's water.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose | eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Rabbi Abraham Rice arrived in East Baltimore 170 years ago from Europe, and over the weekend dozens of his descendants came here, too, to meet distant relatives and learn more about the first ordained rabbi to lead a congregation in the United States. The Rice family reunion gathered Sunday at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, which coincidentally is celebrating its 50th anniversary and the recent renovation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue, where Rabbi Rice served so long ago. Jewish immigrants began arriving in America in the 1650s, and by 1840 about 10,000 Jews lived in the country, said Deborah Weiner, research historian at the museum.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1996
It was one of the odder combos of the Second World War: The young rabbinical student alongside the German secretary to the Japanese consul in Lithuania, both stamping the passports of thousands of Jews with visas to an uncertain future.Such was the state of Europe in July 1940 -- that a frightened and unknown Jewish boy could show up at a foreign diplomat's office and wind up processing visas the same day. Most of the other consulates in Lithuania -- which had just been taken over by the Russians -- had shut down.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
Inside the Lloyd Street Synagogue, the third oldest Jewish synagogue building in the country, Emmy Mogelinsky, a purposeful woman with a strong carriage and face, asks a group of mostly black middle school students if they have ever heard of the Holocaust.Hands do not go up. "It is a period in Germany when Hitler did his darnedest to wipe out all the Jews. All of them!" she explains.Mrs. Mogelinsky, a Holocaust survivor herself, gives a passionate thumbnail sketch of the Third Reich. It was "supposed to last 1,000 years.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 17, 1997
The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has received a $60,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to document all pre-World War II synagogues in Maryland.The research will lead to the development of an extensive architectural and photographic exhibit titled "The Synagogues of Maryland."In announcing the grant, Maryland's Democratic Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes noted that the state is one of the oldest and richest areas of Jewish settlement and culture in the United States.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
Archaeologists working in Maryland's first synagogue have unearthed a mikvah, or ritual bath, at least 150 years old, offering a glimpse of Jewish life in 19th-century Baltimore. The mikvah was discovered under two existing baths in the basement of what is now Lloyd Street Synagogue in East Baltimore. The synagogue was built in 1845 as the first home of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. "Since this was the first building built in Maryland as a synagogue, this is a very important find for understanding the history of Judaism in Maryland," said Esther Doyle Read, director of the Baltimore Center for Urban Archaeology, who supervised the project.
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