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By ROGER SIMON | December 9, 1992
Lloyd Bentsen as Treasury secretary? Excuse me? This is supposed to be the breath of fresh air that Bill Clinton promised?Lloyd Bentsen, whose nickname is "Loophole Lloyd" for all the tax breaks he has given big business, is no breath of fresh air.He is more like a puff of stale dust.It has been widely reported that Clinton will soon name Bentsen to his Cabinet and he will do so as a signal to calm big business.But is that why we elected Clinton? To calm things?I thought it was to shake things up. To change things.
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NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
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BUSINESS
By David W. Myers and David W. Myers,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1991
Some real estate experts expect Congress and the Bush administration to reach an accord this year that will finally allow first-time buyers to make penalty-free withdrawals from their retirement accounts to buy a house.Proposals aimed at letting cash-strapped buyers tap their Individual Retirement Accounts or other retirement plans have been introduced every year since the mid-1980s. Each proposal has fallen victim to partisan bickering or concerns about their impact on the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
By DENNIS MCLELLAN and DENNIS MCLELLAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2006
Lloyd Bentsen, the former four-term U.S. senator who was the 1988 Democratic vice presidential nominee and served as President Bill Clinton's first secretary of the treasury, died yesterday. He was 85. Mr. Bentsen, who had been in ill health since suffering two strokes in 1998, died at his home in Houston, a family spokesman said. In a statement yesterday, President Bush called Mr. Bentsen "a man of great honor and distinction." During his 22 years in the Senate, the tall, courtly millionaire was known for his generally conservative voting record on foreign policy and economic issues while maintaining a more moderate position on many social issues.
BUSINESS
By David W. Myers and David W. Myers,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1991
Many important legislative and consumer issues involving home mortgages have been reported on over the past several months, and it is time to revisit a few of them.In February, it was reported that Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, was expected to introduce a bill that would allow first-time buyers or their parents to make penalty-free withdrawals from their retirement accounts to buy a house.Mr. Bentsen did introduce the legislation a few weeks later, and an identical bill was introduced in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 6, 1991
WHILE LISTENING to Ron Smith interview George McGovern on the radio, I got out a book of maps that shows how the nation has voted for president. In 1972, the year George was the Democratic nominee, no Southern state voted Democratic.That was a first, but not a last. In 1984 and 1988, same thing. Yet the Democrats cannot win the presidency without getting a good Southern vote. Never have, never will.Jimmy Carter carried 10 of the 11 Southern states. Lyndon Johnson got 6 of the 11 in 1964. John Kennedy in 1960 was elected by carrying the Southern electoral vote 81-33-14 (6 1/2 states to 3 to 1 1/2 for a third party candidate)
NEWS
By Newsday | December 4, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- President-elect Bill Clinton and his top advisers intend to make final selections for the incoming administration's economic team over the weekend with the expectation that Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, would get the first offer to become secretary of the Treasury, according to Democratic sources."
NEWS
By DENNIS MCLELLAN and DENNIS MCLELLAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2006
Lloyd Bentsen, the former four-term U.S. senator who was the 1988 Democratic vice presidential nominee and served as President Bill Clinton's first secretary of the treasury, died yesterday. He was 85. Mr. Bentsen, who had been in ill health since suffering two strokes in 1998, died at his home in Houston, a family spokesman said. In a statement yesterday, President Bush called Mr. Bentsen "a man of great honor and distinction." During his 22 years in the Senate, the tall, courtly millionaire was known for his generally conservative voting record on foreign policy and economic issues while maintaining a more moderate position on many social issues.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | December 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton's imminent choice of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Lloyd Bentsen as Treasury secretary sends special signals to key audiences.To Congress, which has had difficulty in dealing with many Bush administration officials, it sends the message that a respected colleague will help shape and present economic policy.This is likely to pay dividends at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue as the Democrats try to end gridlock and get things done.To the financial markets, always skittish when a Democrat moves into the White House, it is meant to say: Don't worry, here is a political moderate not a big spending liberal; in other words, the deficit is not about to skyrocket.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sen. Phil Gramm, a renegade Democrat who became one of the leading conservative Republicans in Congress, announced yesterday that he won't run for re-election next year. Gramm's decision brings to three the number of Senate veterans - all Republicans - who have announced they are retiring. Democrats hold a one-seat edge in the Senate, and control of the chamber is the top prize in the 2002 elections. But Gramm's retirement, which had long been rumored, might only marginally improve Democrats' chances of picking up his seat.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 8, 1993
Washington. -- We need a new taxonomy of politics. A ruling by a federal district judge proves that anarchy, usually defined as the absence of government, can be approximated by a glut of the kind of government produced by liberal legislation and judicial activism.A federal law requires the government to file environmental-impact statements for all ''proposals for legislation and other major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.'' ''Human'' encompasses spotted owls.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- The dollar fell to record lows against the Japanese yen yesterday as traders continued to test how far the United States would let the dollar fall in its efforts to put pressure on Tokyo to cut its bloated trade surplus.In late New York trading, the yen was trading at 114.79 to the dollar, slightly above the record low of 114.55 reached earlier in the day but well below its Tuesday close of 116.55.(As of midday Thursday in Tokyo, the dollar had fallen even further, to 114.60 yen.)
NEWS
December 17, 1992
During his 19-hour econothon in Little Rock this week, the policy wonk that the American people elected as their next president was one happy guy. Was this the after-smile of victory, or a nerd's delight in showing off his knowledge, or a politician deftly signaling a concern for domestic problems that never crossed the mind of his disconnected predecessor? Or was it something else?At the risk of revealing what may be Bill Clinton's dirty little secret, we will opt for something else. Maybe, just maybe, he was engaged in the televised larceny of George Bush's recovery.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 9, 1992
Lloyd Bentsen as Treasury secretary? Excuse me? This is supposed to be the breath of fresh air that Bill Clinton promised?Lloyd Bentsen, whose nickname is "Loophole Lloyd" for all the tax breaks he has given big business, is no breath of fresh air.He is more like a puff of stale dust.It has been widely reported that Clinton will soon name Bentsen to his Cabinet and he will do so as a signal to calm big business.But is that why we elected Clinton? To calm things?I thought it was to shake things up. To change things.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | December 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton's imminent choice of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Lloyd Bentsen as Treasury secretary sends special signals to key audiences.To Congress, which has had difficulty in dealing with many Bush administration officials, it sends the message that a respected colleague will help shape and present economic policy.This is likely to pay dividends at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue as the Democrats try to end gridlock and get things done.To the financial markets, always skittish when a Democrat moves into the White House, it is meant to say: Don't worry, here is a political moderate not a big spending liberal; in other words, the deficit is not about to skyrocket.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sen. Phil Gramm, a renegade Democrat who became one of the leading conservative Republicans in Congress, announced yesterday that he won't run for re-election next year. Gramm's decision brings to three the number of Senate veterans - all Republicans - who have announced they are retiring. Democrats hold a one-seat edge in the Senate, and control of the chamber is the top prize in the 2002 elections. But Gramm's retirement, which had long been rumored, might only marginally improve Democrats' chances of picking up his seat.
NEWS
December 17, 1992
During his 19-hour econothon in Little Rock this week, the policy wonk that the American people elected as their next president was one happy guy. Was this the after-smile of victory, or a nerd's delight in showing off his knowledge, or a politician deftly signaling a concern for domestic problems that never crossed the mind of his disconnected predecessor? Or was it something else?At the risk of revealing what may be Bill Clinton's dirty little secret, we will opt for something else. Maybe, just maybe, he was engaged in the televised larceny of George Bush's recovery.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 4, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- President-elect Bill Clinton and his top advisers intend to make final selections for the incoming administration's economic team over the weekend with the expectation that Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, would get the first offer to become secretary of the Treasury, according to Democratic sources."
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Tom Bowman and John Fairhall and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau Staff writer Jules Witcover contributed to this article | April 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Congressional support for Bill Clinton i growing in the wake of Paul E. Tsongas' announcement yesterday that he would not re-enter the Democratic presidential race.Mr. Tsongas did not endorse Mr. Clinton, but he acknowledged that the Arkansas governor is the presumptive nominee.Although Jerry Brown remains in the race, his defeats in last Tuesday's primaries have quieted some of the concern about Mr. Clinton's viability.A group of 16 or 17 House Democrats who met Wednesday to discuss the Democratic candidates are now likely to back Mr. Clinton, said Rep. Don Edwards of California.
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