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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Lizzie Borden took an ax And gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done She gave her father forty-one. There are certain mysteries over time that never seem to lose their appeal. Earlier this summer, I was having dinner with two newspaper colleagues and an author, all three of whom are serious mystery fans, and it wasn't long before the discussion turned to several of the old classics. They and other enthusiasts of the genre never seem to tire of talking or reading about the 1920s disappearance of Judge Joseph F. Crater (never found)
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By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 10, 2013
Hey, now we're talking! Sunday night's episode of "The Walking Dead" - "Internment" - really delivered some action and plot development. It also delivered some comedy gold, as King of Comedy Hershel held court while performing dental surgery. "I hereby declare we have Spaghetti Tuesday every Wednesday, first thing we need to acquire is some pusketti . " That genius line still has me going. Who is he? Steven Wright? Mitch Hedberg? That line was so brilliant cause it was packed with two jokes: first, Spaghetti Tuesday every Wednesday?
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By Carroll Lisby | November 15, 1990
ONCE EVERY generation or so a person or event becomes so famous, so universally known and talked about, that it crosses the line from history into folklore.This happened to railroad legends Casey Jones and John Henry. It's also happened to Lizzie Borden. Everybody knows Lizzie Borden.At a young age I -- like most of my contemporaries -- became acquainted with Lizzie through a popular children's rhyme which went: Lizzie Borden took an axAnd gave her mother 40 whacks.And when the job was nicely done,She gave her father 41.Later my impression of Lizzie and her ax-wielding indiscretion was deepened by a song called "Lizzie Borden," which the Chad Mitchell Trio recorded during the '60s folk revival.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Dorothy Klug, a retired chemistry instructor and hospital volunteer, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The longtime Towson resident was 93. Born Dorothy Louise Burke and raised in Fall River, Mass., she attended a convent school located near the home of Lizzie Borden, then that city's most celebrated resident. For nearly eight decades, Mrs. Klug recounted the daily experience of seeing the woman who was tried, and acquitted, in 1893 for the ax murders of her father and stepmother.
NEWS
By Providence Journal-Bulletin | July 12, 1995
FALL RIVER, Mass. -- To Lizzie Borden buffs around the country, the Borden house has long been a mystery, the missing link in a darkly Oedipal puzzle.Now, the owners of the unassuming Greek revival house on Second Street are thinking of opening the former Borden home to the public.Ronald Evans and Martha McGinn want to transform the private residence into a bed and breakfast/museum that would cater to Lizzie devotees who want to sleep in the rooms where Andrew and Abby Borden were murdered on Aug. 4, 1892.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 4, 1992
Nearly 100 years after Lizzie Borden was accused of savagely killing her father and stepmother in a pique over being served hot mutton soup, a forensic scientist wants to examine the victims' skulls.While a jury found Lizzie not guilty in the deaths, no one else was ever charged in the double homicide committed on the hottest day in the history of Fall River, Mass.James E. Starrs, professor of forensic sciences at George Washington University in Washington, claims the hatchet that was introduced as evidence during Lizzie Borden's trial -- and now in the custody of the Fall River Historical Society -- is not the murder weapon.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
After a trial that lasted two class periods, the seventh grade at Sykesville Middle School acquitted Lizzie Borden of double murder charges.Social studies teacher JoAnn B. Heller planned the mock trial to give her students a better understanding of the judicial process. The class studied the court system, reviewed legal documents and read Lizzie Borden's history.They reached the same conclusion last week that a jury of Borden's peers did in 1892."There just was not enough evidence against her," said Adam Naumann, jury foreman.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | January 19, 1992
Q: How can I find out more about basketball cards and which ones are most valuable? Are there shops or sources that specialize in them?A: The game of basketball recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. The 1991-92 Series I of NBA Hoops official basketball cards feature statistics, biographical information and career highlights and are available in packs of 15 to 47 cards."Dr. James Beckett's Official Price Guide to Basketball Cards" is $6.99 postpaid from the House of Collectibles, 201 E. 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10022; (800)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 27, 1992
In the extensive literature of physical passion, which ranges from Valentine jingles to autopsy reports, "Love Crimes" will amount to but a footnote.A post-feminist thriller meant to be as sleek and alluring as it is provocative, it somehow never comes to much. The movie is all tease.It does move onto new ground, exploring that weird zone in the boy-girl thing that is more than seduction but possibly less than rape, when men don't beat but swindle reluctant women into having sex with them.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 27, 1992
In the extensive literature of physical passion, which ranges from Valentine jingles to autopsy reports, "Love Crimes" will amount to but a footnote.A post-feminist thriller meant to be as sleek and alluring as it is provocative, it somehow never comes to much. The movie is all tease.It does move onto new ground, exploring that weird zone in the boy-girl thing that is more than seduction but possibly less than rape, when men don't beat but swindle reluctant women into having sex with them.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Lizzie Borden took an ax And gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done She gave her father forty-one. There are certain mysteries over time that never seem to lose their appeal. Earlier this summer, I was having dinner with two newspaper colleagues and an author, all three of whom are serious mystery fans, and it wasn't long before the discussion turned to several of the old classics. They and other enthusiasts of the genre never seem to tire of talking or reading about the 1920s disappearance of Judge Joseph F. Crater (never found)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2002
To see television journalism as it ought to be but seldom is, watch Frontline's American Porn tonight on PBS. It's a bare-knuckled and balanced report on the politics, business and culture of pornography that speaks legions about who we are as a society. Despite that enthusiastic recommendation, be warned that the report - including an edited version airing on MPT - potentially is extremely disturbing. It's not troubling because of any bare body parts or harsh language, but because some of the acts discussed involve extreme violence and debase women.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Marego Athans and Edward Lee and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
For more than six months, no one had seen or heard from Thomas Randolph Smith Jr.But Friday night, police investigating complaints about bad checks written on Smith's bank account found out where he was -- buried in the back yard in Southwest Baltimore under a row of tomato plants, slain with an ax.Yesterday his son, Thomas Randolph Smith III, was charged with first-degree murder."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1996
My recommendation: schedule dinner for 5 p.m. and spend it watching the Marx Brothers, then settle in for an evening of the Orioles. It's hoped one team won't resemble the other."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
After a trial that lasted two class periods, the seventh grade at Sykesville Middle School acquitted Lizzie Borden of double murder charges.Social studies teacher JoAnn B. Heller planned the mock trial to give her students a better understanding of the judicial process. The class studied the court system, reviewed legal documents and read Lizzie Borden's history.They reached the same conclusion last week that a jury of Borden's peers did in 1892."There just was not enough evidence against her," said Adam Naumann, jury foreman.
FEATURES
By Lois R. Shea and Lois R. Shea,BOSTON GLOBE | October 29, 1995
On the morning of Thursday, Aug. 4, 1892, breakfast at 92 Second St. in Fall River, Mass., was mutton.The very same mutton that had made its debut Sunday and resurfaced daily, without refrigeration in between.Some family members already appeared to have suffered food poisoning. But Abby Borden ordered the remains of the mutton served in broth for breakfast.By 9:30 that morning, Abby Borden was dead, hacked to death with a hatchet.By 11:15, her husband Andrew had met the same fate.Lizzie Andrew Borden, his daughter, was tried and acquitted of the murders.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Dorothy Klug, a retired chemistry instructor and hospital volunteer, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The longtime Towson resident was 93. Born Dorothy Louise Burke and raised in Fall River, Mass., she attended a convent school located near the home of Lizzie Borden, then that city's most celebrated resident. For nearly eight decades, Mrs. Klug recounted the daily experience of seeing the woman who was tried, and acquitted, in 1893 for the ax murders of her father and stepmother.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Marego Athans and Edward Lee and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
For more than six months, no one had seen or heard from Thomas Randolph Smith Jr.But Friday night, police investigating complaints about bad checks written on Smith's bank account found out where he was -- buried in the back yard in Southwest Baltimore under a row of tomato plants, slain with an ax.Yesterday his son, Thomas Randolph Smith III, was charged with first-degree murder."
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | October 14, 1995
O.J. Simpson was acquitted because the glove didn't fit, two persuasive forensic experts disputed the police labs, the time line was tight and a key police witness was discredited.That added up to reasonable doubt in the minds of most jurors.The speedy decisiveness of the jury convinces me that most juries enduring the same nine months would have reached the same conclusion, despite the forensic evidence.The result is not satisfying, because Americans demand closure. This is now unlikely in the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, even if civil liability trials await.
NEWS
By Providence Journal-Bulletin | July 12, 1995
FALL RIVER, Mass. -- To Lizzie Borden buffs around the country, the Borden house has long been a mystery, the missing link in a darkly Oedipal puzzle.Now, the owners of the unassuming Greek revival house on Second Street are thinking of opening the former Borden home to the public.Ronald Evans and Martha McGinn want to transform the private residence into a bed and breakfast/museum that would cater to Lizzie devotees who want to sleep in the rooms where Andrew and Abby Borden were murdered on Aug. 4, 1892.
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