Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiz Claiborne
IN THE NEWS

Liz Claiborne

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service nHC XTB | June 5, 1991
There is an ongoing dialectic between fashion that takes risks and fashion that simply gives women what they want. Designers who follow their own lights, and not the skirts of the American women, are bound to stumble commercially here and there. The highly successful Liz Claiborne company takes the opposite approach, as was clear from its resort collection, shown Friday.More than 200 styles were paraded down the runway in an epic presentation that delighted the retailers but could weigh heavily on the eyelids of a regular person.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Shoppers with upscale tastes but shallow pockets are finding more shopping choices with a recent resurgence in outlet and off-price stores being rolled out by major retailers. Discount shopping isn't new. Bargain shoppers have trekked out to outlet malls for decades seeking discounts. Stores like TJ Maxx and Marshalls, who buy leftover goods from department stores and other places and sell them at a markdown, have prospered during the weak economy. But retailers are discovering new opportunities in discount and outlet shopping as frugal consumers are being more careful about what they spend and retailers are looking for ways to grow.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | December 4, 1991
Q. I own 150 shares of Liz Claiborne that have done well for me. I understand that the company will be aggressively advertising for the first time. Does this signal trouble? Should I buy more shares, as I had been planning to do?A.Don't worry. This stock will stay in fashion a long time. Performance of the stock of Liz Claiborne (around $36 a share, New York Stock Exchange), designer of women's apparel, should be average short-term and above average longer-term, said Brenda Gall, analyst with Merrill Lynch & Co.While the company name is well known, Liz Claiborne hasn't advertised on its own in magazines or newspapers in the past, opting instead to simply be a part of retailer advertisements, Gall pointed out. The shift toward placing its own ads might be termed aggressive by some, but this company is cautious enough not to build up large inventories of apparel until it feels sales figures merit it, she said.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Liz Claiborne, who was one of the first designers to dress the American working woman and built a vast business using her name as a recognizable brand, died Tuesday at New York Presbyterian Hospital from cancer. She was 78. Her personal assistant, Gwen Satterfield, reported her death yesterday. Ms. Claiborne, who began her career in New York in 1950, was one of the most recognizable names in fashion in the 1970s and 1980s, particularly among women who wanted quality, career-appropriate clothing and style, too. Ms. Claiborne and her husband, Arthur Ortenberg, founded Liz Claiborne Inc. in 1976.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- Ask women to name their favorite fashion designer and you'll hear a litany of names from Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein to Donna Karan and Bill Blass.Ask women which designer label dominates their closet and many will tell you it's Liz Claiborne. They love the "big names," but they come with equally big price tags.Claiborne, on the other hand, is more affordable and often more applicable to their lives.Although the company's founder, Ms. Claiborne, retired three years ago, the design team she trained has continued her oft-repeated philosophy of clothes the "working woman" can afford.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Liz Claiborne, who was one of the first designers to dress the American working woman and built a vast business using her name as a recognizable brand, died Tuesday at New York Presbyterian Hospital from cancer. She was 78. Her personal assistant, Gwen Satterfield, reported her death yesterday. Ms. Claiborne, who began her career in New York in 1950, was one of the most recognizable names in fashion in the 1970s and 1980s, particularly among women who wanted quality, career-appropriate clothing and style, too. Ms. Claiborne and her husband, Arthur Ortenberg, founded Liz Claiborne Inc. in 1976.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | June 30, 1992
Helping low-income families buy foodThe Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental food program is now enrolling more families in Maryland. WIC provides vouchers, redeemable at grocery and drug stores, for free baby formula, milk, cheese, eggs and cereal to pregnant women, breast-feeding mothers and children under 5 years of age in families on public assistance and those that meet the program's income requirements. A family of two can make up to $17,002 a year and a family of four, $25,808 annually to qualify for the food vouchers.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts.Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | May 8, 1991
Liz Claiborne"Liz Claiborne (LIZ, NYSE, around $46), which designs and markets lines of clothing and accessories for the career woman, as well as men's sportswear, is in a class by itself," says Ruta Financial Newsletter of Bronxville, N.Y."Regardless of economic conditions, we expect the company to continue to increase its market share over the next 12 months. Our best estimate is that this stock can double in price in the next few years. This is an outstanding company . . . We rate the stock a buy."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 27, 1995
Designers are playing the '60s. It was the decade of Jacqueline Kennedy, the grandest diva of American style. It was also the decade of the Beatles and the British invasion of pop music and fashion. Today's dressing is a harmonious blend of those seemingly dissonant strains.Call it madame meets mod -- a practiced look. The midriff isaccented in dressmaker shaping or cropped at the waist in boxy little jackets that once defined the ladylike matinee turnout.The menswear influence remains strong; however it is Carnaby Street and not Wall Street where fashion now strolls.
FEATURES
June 24, 1992
Kathleen Feiring is owner and operator of Studio 15 West Hair Design in Towson. She gets away from it all at her mountain house in Berkley Springs, W. Va. and keeps fit by hiking, skiing and ice skating.How would you describe your taste in clothing?Being casual and comfortable is a priority for me. In my work I first consider how long my day is going to be and how my feet are going to feel. Today I'm in my polka dot shorts set and comfortable white Keds.What's the newest thing in your closet?
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2005
The RSVPs have been duly returned, the sitters arranged for. Now, what to wear to the spate of holiday parties you've scheduled in the next several weeks? Fashion experts say dressing for the holidays this year is simpler than finding the perfect gift for that finicky friend on your list. "This holiday season is all about luxe," says Francine Crocker, spokeswoman for Liz Claiborne Inc. "Look for special touches in every item. From elegant embroidery to delicate sequin embellishments, fashion reflects the mood of the season.
NEWS
By Tanika White and By Tanika White,Sun Staff | March 13, 2005
Peel away those calf-high boots. Shed your layers of tweed and velvet and fur. Like a butterfly emerging from a cocoon, this spring you'll be able to stretch your arms wide and be free! Where fall fashions were prim and proper, new styles for spring are flowy, flouncy, kicky. They're bold, bright, romantic and fun. So pack away those fall and winter clothes that bind. For spring, woman, thou art loosed! "Femininity is an overriding concept," this spring, says Sara Dennis, vice president of product development for Liz Claiborne apparel.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2004
So sweet, so simple Holiday dresses for babies are precious things. Velvet, organza, lace and woolen smocked dresses with Peter Pan collars all suggest the season. But their scratchy textures and "Dry Clean Only" labels are enough to make any parent cringe. Our favorite little person's dress this season is made from baby-soft cotton pinwale corduroy, trimmed in faux Sherpa knit and embellished with embroidered snowflakes. We love the easy buttons down the back from neck to hem and the fact that you can wash the dress at home.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to the Sun | May 30, 2004
Ellen Stern's handbags don't just hang idly from an arm. They bloom. Laden with orchids, lilies and roses, handcrafted from vintage couture flowers and leaves, these rich silk and velvet bags aren't merely accessories, they are the main event. "When people wear them they feel good about themselves," says Stern, a former fashion photographer who grew up in Pikesville and now lives in Reisterstown. "They feel beautiful." As a photographer, Stern worked for 15 years in Italy and New York, shooting advertising spreads for designers that appeared in such magazines as GQ, Washingtonian and In Style.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | May 2, 2004
Less, as they say, is more. What was notable about this spring's International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C., and nearby Thomasville was what wasn't there. And that was a good thing. Start with parking spaces. "I don't remember the last [time here] I had to wait in line to park," says Michelle Lamb, editor of the industry newsletter The Trend Curve -- suggesting that this spring there's a new and lively interest among the buyers, interior designers and architects who traditionally attend.
NEWS
By Mercedes Suarez and By Mercedes Suarez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2002
Who says your shoes have to match? Not the Majorcan shoe company Camper, which features a funky line of asymmetrical footwear called Twins. These shoes are perfect couples, different yet complementary. For example, a pair of flip-flops pictures whole fruit on the bottom of one shoe and halved fruit on the other, or a pair has a design or phrase that carries from one shoe to the other (She loves me ... She loves me not.) If you're tired of scuffing about in the same plain summer sandals, these are sure to add a surprise to your wardrobe.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | October 6, 2002
Lift spirits with tote The candy-colored plastic totes for sale at the Baltimore Public Works Museum's gift shop are more than an attractive way to haul lunch or pumps back and forth between the office and home: Sales of the bags go to two good causes. Crafted from the discarded plastic straps from shipping crates, the bags are hand-woven by women who live in a small Burmese village where there are few employment opportunities for women. Proceeds from the bags benefit this women's cooperative as well as the popular Inner Harbor museum.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
When women decided to go to work en masse in the 1970s and had nothing to wear, Ellen Tracy came to the rescue. Ellen Tracy is no super-feminist, symbol of women's rights - or even a real person. It's the label of a fashion house that was savvy enough to realize that being a career woman didn't necessarily have to mean dressing like a man. To many, Tracy became their best friend - albeit a pricey one. And if they looked behind the labels of those well-cut jackets and skirts, they'd find a fellow working woman named Linda Allard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.