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NEWS
August 12, 2003
SHE WOULD get up in the morning about 5:30 so there'd be enough time before work to take the first of her medications, figure out what she could tolerate for breakfast, and then deal with the inevitable side effects: the nausea, the diarrhea. Compared to other women she knew with HIV, Roslyn was lucky; she didn't require a noontime dose that would make her sleepy, nor did she have to keep her condition a secret from her employer, a medical facility more sympathetic about such matters than most -- though she didn't want her full name in print.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
Harry L. Holfelder, First and Franklin Street Presbyterian Church's retired pastor and an early advocate for the spiritual and physical needs of people with AIDS, died of cancer Saturday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He lived in Mount Washington and was 70. Arriving in Baltimore nearly two decades ago as pastor of the Mount Vernon area church, the Rev. Holfelder held the pulpit for 13 years and was chairman of the AIDS Interfaith Network of Baltimore. "People of faith have to ask themselves whether they will be compassionate or judgmental," he told an Evening Sun reporter in 1989.
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NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | August 22, 1994
AT THE 10th international conference on AIDS, which recently was held in Japan, immunologist William E. Paul, director of the U.S. Office of AIDS Research, said that while there's no cure for the disease on the horizon, there is a positive phenomenon at work: There are some long-term HIV survivors, or, as the scientists call it, long-term non-progression of the disease.It seems that while almost every person who has HIV eventually gets sick and dies, about 5 percent are still in good health 12 to 15 years after their infection.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 28, 2004
LAMAR, S.C. - The middle-age couple living in a trailer park in this small farming community have kept a secret from their friends and neighbors for more than five years: Both are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Deborah Grant and her boyfriend, Larry Frazier, both 45, represent an emerging face of HIV and AIDS in America. They are African-American, poor, heterosexual and they live in the rural South. In a striking parallel to the AIDS epidemic in Africa, HIV is sweeping through black communities in the South, where stigma, inadequate medical care and poverty hamper efforts to educate and prevent its spread.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 18, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eric Ciasullo runs through his schedule as if he were on a sight-seeing trip through the Land of Pharmacology. If it's 7 o'clock this must be Crixivan. If it's 8 o'clock it must be DDI. If it's 9: 30, it must be D4T, Diflucan, Acyclovir, Bactrim, Myambutol, Biaxin.He opens the medicine chest in his apartment to show me shelves full of bottles. It is a daunting regimen of 19 pills -- some to be taken on an empty stomach, others on a full stomach, some with water -- that he must take every day, for the foreseeable future.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson | November 28, 1994
MAN, I LOVE dope more than I love anything in this whole wide world!"Those are the words of Reginald C., known on Baltimore's drug-dealing corners as "Pimp."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
Television's most forthright handling of the AIDS issue draws toward a resolution this weekend as ABC's "Life Goes On" prepares to leave the air before a probable series finale due in May.But contrary to some earlier predictions, the AIDS-afflicted teen character of Jesse (Chad Lowe) does not die in tomorrow's final episode of a four-show "arc" dealing with the issue (7 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13). Instead, he resolves to fight his disease through diet and other treatments."The story is not the story of someone dying from AIDS, but of someone living with AIDS," Mr. Lowe said earlier this week.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Maryland was awarded $6.9 million in federal grants yesterday to provide housing and support services for low-income people with HIV and AIDS.The grant, of which the Baltimore metropolitan area will receive $5.8 million, was among 42 awarded to 40 states; Washington, D.C.; and Puerto Rico to help commemorate World AIDS Day.The federal government allocated $220 million to help more than 65,000 low-income people with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune...
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
Just 1 percent of HIV/AIDS cases in Maryland come from Howard County, but health officials say county residents should not be lulled into a false sense of security. The risk of contracting the disease remains significant in the metropolitan area, they say. Some 212 people with HIV or AIDS reside in Howard County. That contrasts with 11,260 in nearby Baltimore, according to area health department statistics as of March 31. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Maryland ranks fourth nationally in new AIDS cases.
NEWS
August 12, 2003
SHE WOULD get up in the morning about 5:30 so there'd be enough time before work to take the first of her medications, figure out what she could tolerate for breakfast, and then deal with the inevitable side effects: the nausea, the diarrhea. Compared to other women she knew with HIV, Roslyn was lucky; she didn't require a noontime dose that would make her sleepy, nor did she have to keep her condition a secret from her employer, a medical facility more sympathetic about such matters than most -- though she didn't want her full name in print.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
With AIDS cases on the rise in Carroll, the county Health Department has organized an observance the day after World AIDS Day to raise awareness, stress preventive measures and offer reminders that, despite life-prolonging advances in treatment, the epidemic is spreading. A panel from the AIDS Memorial Quilt will provide the backdrop for the two-hour event tomorrow at the department's offices in Westminster. The staff will give a primer on acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Visitors will see exhibits and pamphlets that list statistics, and a college theater troupe will perform skits that stress safe sex. An AIDS patient will speak.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
Just 1 percent of HIV/AIDS cases in Maryland come from Howard County, but health officials say county residents should not be lulled into a false sense of security. The risk of contracting the disease remains significant in the metropolitan area, they say. Some 212 people with HIV or AIDS reside in Howard County. That contrasts with 11,260 in nearby Baltimore, according to area health department statistics as of March 31. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Maryland ranks fourth nationally in new AIDS cases.
NEWS
June 25, 2001
THE SHEER number of AIDS cases facing struggling African countries boggles the mind. Even those who've grown immune to the heart-wrenching pleas for aid that inevitably accompany news of one Third World tragedy or another are surely struck by the enormity of the AIDS crisis: More than 25 million people in sub-Saharan Africa are currently infected with HIV. That's more than have died worldwide from AIDS since the 1980s and includes as many as 20 percent...
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Maryland was awarded $6.9 million in federal grants yesterday to provide housing and support services for low-income people with HIV and AIDS.The grant, of which the Baltimore metropolitan area will receive $5.8 million, was among 42 awarded to 40 states; Washington, D.C.; and Puerto Rico to help commemorate World AIDS Day.The federal government allocated $220 million to help more than 65,000 low-income people with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune...
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
With a quilt display today and a candlelight vigil this evening, health officials and medical professionals will join people infected with AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus and their families to commemorate World AIDS Day at area colleges and medical centers.In Baltimore, an estimated 14,000 people are living with AIDS, and roughly half are not receiving care for the disease, according to officials at University of Maryland Medical Center.The medical center, at 22 S. Greene St. in downtown Baltimore, is holding a series of events to increase awareness of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS epidemic -- including a presentation by Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the clinical program for the Institute of Human Virology.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 18, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eric Ciasullo runs through his schedule as if he were on a sight-seeing trip through the Land of Pharmacology. If it's 7 o'clock this must be Crixivan. If it's 8 o'clock it must be DDI. If it's 9: 30, it must be D4T, Diflucan, Acyclovir, Bactrim, Myambutol, Biaxin.He opens the medicine chest in his apartment to show me shelves full of bottles. It is a daunting regimen of 19 pills -- some to be taken on an empty stomach, others on a full stomach, some with water -- that he must take every day, for the foreseeable future.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the first time since the AIDS epidemic began in 1981, deaths from the disease have dropped "substantially" across the country, federal health officials said yesterday.The overall decline was 13 percent -- to 22,000 in the first six months of 1996 from 24,900 in the same period of 1995 -- in all regions of the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in its weekly report.The range was from a high of 16 percent in the West to 15 percent in the Northeast, 11 percent in the Midwest and 8 percent in the South, the federal agency said.
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