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Living Wills

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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Life-and-death decisions involving thousands of critically ill people could be profoundly affected next year under a new law requiring that patients be informed of their right to refuse life-prolonging care.Starting next year, all adult patients must be told on admission to a hospital, nursing home or health maintenance organization how to prepare a legally binding living will, which typically directs doctors not to use heroic measures in hopeless cases.As a result, death could come more swiftly for thousands of critically ill people in years to come, according to medical researchers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Marylanders love oysters, so news of restaurants focused on the slippery bivalves, like Bel Air's brand-new Main Street Oyster House, is always welcome. Opened in mid-October, the Oyster House is masterful with oysters and service and does a decent job with everything else. It's lively and fun and sure to be a huge hit with people looking for a good time in downtown Bel Air. The team behind the Oyster House also owns Ropewalk Tavern in Federal Hill and Ropewalk Oyster House, which opened in Fenwick Island, Del., last summer.
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NEWS
October 23, 1995
North Arundel Hospital offers monthly lectures on patient "advance directives."Participants can learn about creating a living will and selecting someone to make health care decisions for the patient under certain circumstances.The meetings in the hospital's Third Floor Conference Center include a videotape and an opportunity for participants to fill out documents and ask questions.This month's lecture will be from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., today.* The hospital has a 16-page booklet on living wills it will provide free to area residents.
NEWS
By Steven S. Sharfstein | March 17, 2013
Some years ago, I was called by one of my patients who had just suffered severe rejection in a love relationship. She told me that she was on her way to buy a gun but thought she might call me first. I suggested that she come see me before she purchased a gun so we could talk it over. In the intense debate on gun violence and mental illness, with a focus on the extremely rare event of mass murders such as in Newtown, Conn., or Aurora, Colo., what is lost in the conversation and debate is the serious suicide epidemic we experience in the United States every year due to gun violence.
NEWS
By Charles Green and Charles Green,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 16, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to provide patients with information on living wills, documents that allow patients to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off.Critics warned that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters said it would help patients from being kept alive against their wishes.A provision tucked away in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients whether they had signed a living will and offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Contributing writer | February 3, 1991
A new federal law requiring hospitals and nursing homes to inform patients of their right to refuse medical treatment under certain circumstances could cause a flood of requests for "living wills," say county health-care providers and attorneys.Attorneys and doctors heresay they already have noticed increased interest in living wills, which spell out a person's wishes for medical treatment should he or she become terminally ill.And they expect that the federal law, which will go into effect next November, will only increase the number of people asking for the legally binding document to be drawn up.Several area health-careadministrators said they think the trend toward obtaining living wills, along with a second document called a medical durable power of attorney, can only facilitate the care of terminally ill patients or those in a permanent coma.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
Maryland's board of physicians has reprimanded Del. Dan K. Morhaim and placed him on a year's probation for unprofessional conduct in the execution of living wills for three residents of a nursing home where he works as medical director. The penalties are detailed in a consent order signed this month by Morhaim, one of two practicing physicians in the General Assembly. It was made effective Thursday. In its findings, the board said that two years ago, Morhaim pre-signed blank forms certifying that he had examined nursing home residents and found they met the conditions required for withdrawal of treatment.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
Maryland's medical disciplinary board has charged Del. Dan K. Morhaim with falsifying documents in the execution of living wills for three residents of a nursing home where he works as medical director. Morhaim, an emergency physician who also supervises medical care at Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation in Pikesville, is alleged to have signed forms attesting to the patients' inability to make decisions for themselves, without examining them. One of two practicing medical doctors in the General Assembly, the Baltimore County Democrat represents the 11th District, which includes Owings Mills, Reisterstown and much of the county's west side.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
The demand for living wills and their companion, the durable power of attorney, has risen dramatically as more people become aware that their wishes regarding the withholding of life support in the event ofterminal illness may not be honored without the documents."
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 16, 1991
A clear majority of elderly Americans oppose the use of life-sustaining medical technologies to prolong their lives, but most have neither signed living wills nor appointed someone to act on their behalf, two new studies indicate.A study of 103 residents at a Rockville nursing home reported that most of them did not want their lives extended by the use of respirators or feeding tubes.Ninety percent of the residents said that if necessary, they would choose a relative to make their health-care decisions for them.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
James R. Adams, a giant on Madison Avenue during the years immediately after World War II, once said that advertising is the "principal reason why the business man has come to inherit the Earth. " Surely, the three weeks prior to an election give further reason why modern "Mad Men" still have a lot to say about how people behave at the polls, let alone the marketplace. Those ads for Question 7 that have flooded Maryland's airwaves in recent weeks aren't detached, dry recitations of why expanded gambling is good or bad for Maryland.
NEWS
October 5, 2008
The Harper's Choice Community Association will sponsor a Safety Awareness and Crime Prevention Town Meeting at 7 p.m. Oct. 14 at Kahler Hall, 5440 Old Tucker Road in Harper's Choice Village Center. The Harper's Choice Village Board, County Councilwoman Mary Kay Sigaty, and senior members of the Howard County Police Department will participate in a discussion about safety. Information: 410-730-0770. Health programs The Howard County Library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, will offer "Sugar: How Much is Too Much?
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 9, 2008
Sure, fill out a living will because it might let you and your loved ones avoid heartache and agony at the end of your life. But here's another reason: It'll potentially save your heirs and society tens of thousands of dollars. Especially in Maryland, which is one of the most expensive places in the country to become terminally ill, according to newly published research. Only 34 percent of Marylanders have living wills, says Dan Morhaim, a physician and Baltimore County delegate. He and Johns Hopkins public health professor Keshia Pollack just did a survey that he says will be the first study of its kind when they publish.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | October 7, 2007
We were watching an episode from the first season of Seinfeld, wherein Jerry picks up an early portable, cordless phone to take a call. "What's that?" my youngest son asked. "That's a cordless phone," I said. "No way!" he replied. "Seriously," I said, "that's what the first cordless phones looked like." Sure enough, there's Jerry, walking around his cool New York apartment with what looks like a shoebox pressed to his ear. "It's so ... huge," my son said. "We had one just like it," I said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | July 18, 2007
After initially disputing labor department charges that the Baltimore Fire Department knowingly violated safety rules during a fatal live-burn training exercise in February, the city has withdrawn its objections and outlined plans to prevent future violations, according to documents obtained by The Sun. In two memos, the Fire Department states that it will no longer burn buildings outside the fire academy grounds and that safety officers will be present...
NEWS
April 15, 2007
As part of its Shmooze Hour program, to be held at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Bain Center, the Jewish Federation of Howard County will sponsor a talk by Kasia Kines on eating well and staying healthy. She will discuss symptoms of an inadequate diet and how people can find motivation and direction to change their diets. Nutritious snacks will be provided. The Bain Center is at 5470 Ruth Keeton Way. Information: Sophie Novinsky, 410-730-4976, Ext. 31. Also Wednesday, Art Silverglate will speak at the meeting of the Central Maryland User Group (CMUG)
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
A few years ago, after a Carroll County woman suffered a stroke at a local senior citizens center, her friends were shocked when they visited her in the hospital and found her attached to feeding tubes, said Betty Bates, a legal assistant with the Legal Aid Bureau.Ms. Bates said, "Many people asked, 'She didn't want tubes. How come she's on food and water tubes?' "Ms. Bates said the incident caused "an onslaught" of the woman's friends coming to Legal Aid to ask for help preparing "living wills."
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | December 2, 1991
A year ago, the bipartisan efforts of Republican Sen. John Danforth and Democratic Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan resulted in a law that should help give Americans more control over health-care decisions at the end of life.The Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA), which goes into effect Dec. 1, requires that people entering health-care facilities be informed of their rights to refuse medical treatment, as well as whatever rights their state provides for drawing up advance directives such as living wills or health-care proxies.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 31, 2005
BOSTON - What now will be the legacy of Terri Schiavo? A country as polarized as her husband and parents, who cannot even agree on the interment of her body? A Congress so craven that it passes a law turning every such case into every such circus? Or is it possible that people on either side of this case will arrive at the same moral place? Will they sit down at the dinner table with their families and their living wills? Will they, at last, have a long, hard discussion about "what I would want" and "who will make those decisions for me"?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
Maryland's board of physicians has reprimanded Del. Dan K. Morhaim and placed him on a year's probation for unprofessional conduct in the execution of living wills for three residents of a nursing home where he works as medical director. The penalties are detailed in a consent order signed this month by Morhaim, one of two practicing physicians in the General Assembly. It was made effective Thursday. In its findings, the board said that two years ago, Morhaim pre-signed blank forms certifying that he had examined nursing home residents and found they met the conditions required for withdrawal of treatment.
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