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HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
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NEWS
February 12, 2014
I'm so glad the Obama administration is developing support mechanisms to help the livestock industry adjust to the impacts of climate change ("U.S. sets up 10 'climate hubs' to assist farmers, ranchers," Feb 6). Since the industry is among the largest sources of greenhouse gases, it's only appropriate the government establish a support program to help them with their addiction, right? Next, shall we also establish a burn healing center for arsonists? How about a road rash support group for dirt bike gangs?
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
The rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the more alarming health threats of the past several decades. Some of the nation's top hospitals, including one operated by the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have experienced deadly outbreaks. Altogether, such infections kill an estimated 23,000 Americans each year, which is more than die of leukemia, Parkinson's disease or HIV/AIDS, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One factor thought to be contributing to the deadly trend is the use of antibiotics in farm animals.
NEWS
September 4, 1991
County livestock producers are eligible for federal aid because of the drought, officials announced last week.The Emergency Feed Program was approved for county farmers, said Elizabeth A. Schaeffer, director of the county Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service.A public meeting to explain the program is 7:30 p.m. Thursday atthe county Cooperative Extension Service office at the AgricultureCenter.Officials also will discuss other aid programs available to county farmers.The feed program provides federal aid to livestock producers who have suffered losses of at least 40 percent on their feed crops as a result of the drought.
NEWS
By Photos by Amy Davis and Photos by Amy Davis,Sun photographer | September 4, 2006
The Cow Palace at the Timonium fairgrounds will see one more day of action today, the closing day of the 125th Maryland State Fair - one more day of primping and fussing that rivals the highest-stakes human beauty pageant. When cows arrive at the palace for any one of 11 days of competition this year, they are clipped, washed, blow-dried, sprayed and fed. Proud owners sometimes have their charges photographed after the judging, by livestock photographer Billy Joe Heath. Although the fair involves a lot of last-minute grooming, cattle farmers say they work all year to get their cattle "in bloom" so their animals will show their best stuff for the event.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
Jenny stepped quickly off the trailer into her new home, striding over to Jack, who seemed interested in the fresh arrival. The two donkeys leaned their gray faces toward each other for an instant, then Jack followed her around a bit before Jenny trotted off, exploring the far ends of her fenced pasture. The gray-and-white Jerusalem donkey became the 18th livestock resident of the new Burleigh Manor Animal Sanctuary and Eco Retreat in Ellicott City, but that's if you don't count the tabby cat, Barnie.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE | March 10, 2006
State police searching for a stolen motorcycle yesterday at a western Carroll County farm discovered numerous livestock carcasses on the property. In the past two years, the county Humane Society has collected from neighboring properties more than a dozen pigs and several goats, llamas and emus that escaped from the farm, which is owned by Carroll L. Schisler Sr., 49, of Marston, authorities said. Police said they found a Harley-Davidson motorcycle hidden beneath hay bales and a stolen skid loader.
NEWS
November 25, 1993
Monica Feeser of Taneytown and Melissa Harrison of Day, members of the Maryland 4-H livestock judging team, traveled to Louisville, Ky., for the North American International Livestock Exposition, which began on Nov. 16.The Maryland group placed seventh overall out of 38 teams.Ms. Feeser received 20th place in the individual rankings.The team had won a state fair competition at West Springfield, Mass., on Sept. 18.It won again at the Eastern National Livestock Show in Timonium one week later and placed second at the Keystone International Livestock Exposition in Harrisburg, Pa., on Oct. 2.Ms.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1996
Recent high corn prices have been a boon for grain farmers in Carroll County, where corn is the top agricultural crop, but troublesome to livestock producers.Farmers in central Maryland last month earned an average $5.23 per bushel of grain corn, according to statistics issued by the state Department of Agriculture. That compares with an average of $2.89 a bushel in June last year and $3.06 a bushel in June 1994."I hope it stays that way," said Lou Fisher, who grows corn, soybeans and wheat near Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Mark Hofberg | December 10, 2013
What can I do to help the environment? As a master's student in conservation biology and environmental policy, I get this question often from my (mostly) left-leaning, but financially focused, friends. They generally understand that the environment is important, but with long work hours and an overflow "green" products and tips in the media, there is confusion about what is effective or even useful. There is a simple way to help; one that does not require wearing hemp or even scrapping your car (although that would be nice)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The Howard County administration is backing off a proposal to revise the county code - with new rules regarding livestock on small properties and a new definition of a farm - after local horse owners raised an uproar about it. "I think they're getting phenomenal heat," said Susan Gray, a land-use attorney and horse owner who had opposed the changes. Gray and others said the revisions would have posed a threat not only to horse owners, but to 4-H clubs and all agriculture in the county.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
Jenny stepped quickly off the trailer into her new home, striding over to Jack, who seemed interested in the fresh arrival. The two donkeys leaned their gray faces toward each other for an instant, then Jack followed her around a bit before Jenny trotted off, exploring the far ends of her fenced pasture. The gray-and-white Jerusalem donkey became the 18th livestock resident of the new Burleigh Manor Animal Sanctuary and Eco Retreat in Ellicott City, but that's if you don't count the tabby cat, Barnie.
HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
NEWS
May 17, 2012
According to Wicomico County Executive Richard M. Pollitt Jr. ("So what if O'Malley emails with Perdue lawyer," May 13), "[n]ot only is our entire region and state helped by the economics of the chicken industry, but so is our environment. " How could he possibly arrive at that conclusion? The data tells quite a different story. Maryland crop and livestock production combined has constituted about 0.35 percent of the state's Gross Domestic Product for the past decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis at the Commerce Department.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
A U.S. District Court judge issued an emergency temporary restraining order yesterday to prevent two Carroll County livestock farmers from slaughtering animals and selling them to the public. Carroll Schisler Sr., 60, and his son, Carroll Schisler Jr., 34, face federal charges for operating a slaughterhouse without a license as well as animal cruelty charges in the county. The 112-acre Marston farm, outside New Windsor, has been under quarantine since early spring, after a pig was found to have trichinosis.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
On an evening when they decided to pay more than $7 million to preserve farmland and to borrow $37 million to upgrade a sewer plant, Harford County Council members had their most heated debate about an issue that has cost the county $3,500 since 1990.The argument Tuesday night centered on whether the county should keep a law that requires it to reimburse farmers for livestock killed by dogs or other predators.All seven council members seemed to agree that the principle -- not money -- was the issue.
NEWS
By Tom Vilsack | December 12, 2011
Whether it was on my "rural tour" of states throughout the country or at workshops with the Department of Justice to discuss competition in agriculture, time and again, livestock and poultry producers have emphasized the need for a fair and competitive industry and workable, common-sense rules to address bad actors. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently finalized a rule to implement the 2008 Farm Bill to help remedy some of these concerns. In the last 30 years, the livestock and poultry marketplace has not only become more concentrated but also more vertically integrated.
EXPLORE
August 4, 2011
There have been some rumblings in the past two or three years that moving the Harford County Farm Fair from its home since it was re-established nearly quarter of a century ago might become necessary. Certainly, the farm fair is one the more well-attended events in Harford County, with the Fourth of July festivities in Bel Air being one of the few things that's consistently a bigger draw. The farm fair is a big event and has been since it started, and it has been associated since the beginning with the Harford County Equestrian Center on Tollgate Road in Bel Air. Granted, there had been a county fair of sorts previously, but not on the scale of what's evolved at the equestrian center.
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