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NEWS
December 1, 2003
On November 29, 2003 ALBERT A. "Bill" Livesay of Howard County, brother of Larkin Livesay Jr., of Carroll County and the late Marvin Livesay. Mr Livesay is also survived by his good friend Jack Johnson. Friends may call at the family owned and operated Slack Funeral Home P.A., 3871 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City Monday 5 to 8 P.. Services from the above funeral home Tuesday 11 A.M. Interment Good Shepherd Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | July 1, 2007
It is a time for healing and reorganization for Howard County Republicans -- a process under way last week at a political picnic at grassy Spring Meadow Farm in Glenwood. Still stung by a poor showing in last year's state and local elections, not to mention nationally, the county's GOP also has internal rivalries and sore spots to deal with before the next round of local elections in 2010. Republicans were successful last year only in the western portion of the county, electing incumbent state Sen. Allan H. Kittleman and Dels.
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NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Over fruit cup and eggs at an Ellicott City diner yesterday, Howard County Executive James N. Robey and Police Chief Wayne Livesay decided that Livesay will remain in office for at least several more months while he runs for County Council. Robey said Livesay would leave his job as chief to campaign, but not until the Police Department completes a reaccreditation evaluation. "I asked him to stay at least until accreditation is over," Robey said. Livesay, who accompanied the executive on a visit to a Columbia business yesterday, said the process should be complete in April.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Amid increasingly bitter bickering among western Howard County Republicans, one GOP candidate for County Council announced his withdrawal this week, shifting his support to Wayne Livesay, the former county police chief. Jim Adams said he is dismayed by what he termed "dirty politics" practiced by Greg Fox, the third Republican council candidate in District 5, and that Fox's campaign tactics -- particularly telephone polling tactics -- drove his decision to withdraw and back Livesay. Adams' name still will appear on the ballot, however.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
Maj. Wayne Livesay, who oversees day-to-day operations of the Howard County Police Department, will become the county's next police chief on Saturday, said County Executive Charles I. Ecker.Howard County police officers applauded the move, saying they were getting a demanding boss with "road cop" instincts who also understands the dynamics of Howard County.Livesay replaces Chief James N. Robey, who is retiring Friday to run for county executive."He's a good cop and a people person," Ecker said.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2003
Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay was sworn in yesterday as the 42nd president of the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association at its annual conference in Ocean City. Livesay takes over the one-year position from James R. Craze, Greenbelt's chief of police. "I'm excited ... these are challenging times," Livesay said yesterday in a telephone interview. During his term, Livesay said, he will focus on building unity in the association, which includes about 135 police chiefs, "so that we're speaking with one voice around the state."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
Shortly after joining the Howard County Police Department in 1972, a young officer met a promising corporal, James N. Robey, beginning a relationship that molded their careers -- and the police force.That officer was Wayne Livesay, who grew up poor, rolling sod during summers and laboring as a janitor while a student at Glenelg High School. After graduating and being laid off from a factory job, he joined the Howard County force, where he excelled, rising quickly through the ranks -- always on the heels of Robey, who became his mentor.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
At a forum last night, Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay promised residents of a mostly black community that he will not tolerate racial profiling -- stopping motorists because of their race."
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Howard County's longest-serving police chief, Wayne Livesay, will retire May 31 after more than eight years in command to devote himself full time to running for County Council, he said yesterday -- the same day he received a legal opinion saying he would have to resign to avoid violating federal law. "I was up all night last night, because I knew today was coming. It's been a rough couple days [emotionally]. This has been my life," he said. Livesay, 54, who joined the Howard force more than 34 years ago, said he had decided on his last day months ago but announced it shortly after receiving word from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel that he must resign by June 2 or be in violation of the Hatch Act, which bars political activity by federal employees.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay said yesterday that a burglary suspect's recent short-lived escape from custody is a glaring example of why the county needs to stop transferring prisoners to Ellicott City for bail hearings, creating unnecessary costs and safety risks. For several years, Livesay said, he has requested that District Court judges appoint a bail commissioner to the Southern District, eliminating prisoner transfers altogether. Livesay said his oral and written requests have been turned down repeatedly.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
Republican County Council candidate Greg Fox succinctly summed up his case to be the GOP's nominee in District 5 at a recent Howard County Republican Club forum in Lisbon. "It is our seat, and you should be sure it is held by a true Republican -- somebody who has always been a Republican," Fox said. Fox's comments about loyalty are aimed at retired county Police Chief Wayne Livesay. The two and third-time candidate Jim Adams are locked in a three-way Republican primary battle for the nomination.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Livesay accused of conflict of interest The Hatch Act is a provision of federal law that prohibits those who apply for and supervise federal funds from seeking office in a partisan election. Wayne Livesay filed to run for Howard County Council on Feb. 22 and then actively campaigned for the seat while Chief of Police. As such, I believe from that moment Mr. Livesay was in violation of the Hatch Act. The Sun reported, "According to the opinion [by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel], Livesay's signature on current federal grant applications and his supervision of their implementation means he is covered by the Hatch Act."
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
On a spring afternoon in 1991, then-Lt. Wayne Livesay was in the middle of a four-hour standoff with a man holding three hostages when a police sniper announced that he had a clear shot. The hostage-taker's attorney later told The Sun that Livesay "stepped in immediately and said, `No! You do not have permission to do that.'" During his 8 1/2 years as chief of the Howard County Police Department, Livesay, 54, has built a reputation for conservative judgment and by-the-book policing. At a police academy graduation last year, he focused his speech on integrity, warning recruits that the public is always watching and that he would fire any officer who lied.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Howard County Executive James N. Robey said yesterday that he will name an acting police chief next week to replace Wayne Livesay, who is retiring May 31 to run for the County Council. Livesay, 54, the county's longest-serving chief, has been with the department for almost 34 years. He said yesterday that he has discussed the selection with Robey. "I hope that a county executive never goes to the outside" to find a new chief, Livesay said. "You want someone who knows the county and knows the department.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Howard County's longest-serving police chief, Wayne Livesay, will retire May 31 after more than eight years in command to devote himself full time to running for County Council, he said yesterday -- the same day he received a legal opinion saying he would have to resign to avoid violating federal law. "I was up all night last night, because I knew today was coming. It's been a rough couple days [emotionally]. This has been my life," he said. Livesay, 54, who joined the Howard force more than 34 years ago, said he had decided on his last day months ago but announced it shortly after receiving word from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel that he must resign by June 2 or be in violation of the Hatch Act, which bars political activity by federal employees.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
On May 16, 2006, WILLIAM MICHAEL CARRIGAN, devoted son of the late Melva Mackin and step-son of Leo Wade Adams, beloved brother of Lee Adams, Jr., Jerry Adams, Patrick Adams, Ricky Adams, Michelle Lewandowski, Colleen Adams, Patricia Livesay, Ruthie Hunt, Rose Guy, Kenny Carrigan, Fred Carrigan and Patricia Hanson, loving uncle of Stephanie Adams, Keri Adams, Kevin Livesay, Patrick Adams, Jr., Ricky Adams, Jr., Brian Adams and Celeste Adams, dear great...
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
OCEAN CITY -- Drivers running red lights in Howard County were rarely caught until the county started using automated cameras, Howard's police chief told delegates attending the Maryland Association of Counties convention here yesterday.The Police Department changed its primary mission from criminal enforcement about four or five years ago "because the number of traffic fatalities was increasing year by year," Chief G. Wayne Livesay said.The county has few murders but averages about 15 traffic fatalities each year, he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Amid increasingly bitter bickering among western Howard County Republicans, one GOP candidate for County Council announced his withdrawal this week, shifting his support to Wayne Livesay, the former county police chief. Jim Adams said he is dismayed by what he termed "dirty politics" practiced by Greg Fox, the third Republican council candidate in District 5, and that Fox's campaign tactics -- particularly telephone polling tactics -- drove his decision to withdraw and back Livesay. Adams' name still will appear on the ballot, however.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ | April 9, 2006
Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay has appealed a federal judge's ruling to allow a lawsuit to proceed that claims a female officer was sexually harassed while working in the Police Department. The appeal, which will be heard by the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals, was filed Friday, according to Livesay's spokeswoman, Sherry Llewellyn. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court in October, Officer Susan Ensko claimed the department tolerated a sexually charged culture that included pornography displayed on work computers, sexual insults and harassment for women who complained.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
Howard Police Chief Wayne Livesay is expected, as early as today, to appeal a federal judge's decision to let a female police officer's sexual harassment suit against the department go forward, according to a source familiar with the case. If allowed to stand, the judge's ruling could force the county to offer a settlement or risk having potentially embarrassing testimony revealed during a trial, which is scheduled for February. Susan Ensko filed suit in 2004 alleging that Chief Wayne Livesay and the county tolerated a hostile, men's "locker-room" mentality, jokes about off-hours "bull roasts" involving strippers and retaliation against women who complained.
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