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NEWS
September 8, 1995
Need More DonorsTimonium reader Gladys Scesney recently lamented the high cost of a liver transplant operation in a well-written letter (Aug. 28, "Liver for sale"). She was concerned as a result of an article that she had read that, unfortunately, presented information about transplant operations quite inappropriately.A liver transplant operation is a very complicated procedure, often lasting 10 hours or more and usually costing in excess of $170,000. Ms. Scesney said she read that the liver recipient is charged $20,000 for the liver alone.
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NEWS
September 1, 2006
Benefit 5K walk, run is Sept. 16 The second Donate Life 5K Walk and Run to benefit the National Transplant Assistance Fund will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon Sept. 16 at Oakland Mills High School in Columbia. The event, which supports the Mid-Atlantic Liver Transplant Fund and honors Oakland Mills resident David Hillen, who recently had a liver transplant, is sponsored by the Oakland Mills High School PTSA and local businesses. The cost is $15 in advance; $17 at the gate. Information: Karen Hillen, 410-964-1175.
NEWS
By Robert Erlandson and Robert Erlandson,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
CROFTON -- Children played on the swings and slide, tossed balls and played games with clowns in funny outfits. Adults sat at picnic tables under trees, chatting as the aroma of hot dogs, hamburgers and steamed crabs filled the air.It was a traditional any-weekend American summer picnic, except in one detail: Many of the children and adults were the recipients of life-saving organ transplants -- livers, kidneys, hearts -- who had reunited for a day of...
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | July 22, 1992
A 35-YEAR-OLD man dying of liver failure received a transplant on June 29.There is nothing especially newsworthy about that, since there are more than 2,000 liver transplants performed each year in the United States.What was remarkable was that the liver came from a baboon. This was the first attempt to use a liver from a baboon in a human recipient. So far, the transplant seems to be going well.While it is still too early to say that the experiment is a success, it is not too early to examine the morality of this experiment with a baboon liver.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | December 11, 2005
The new site, This Blog Will Change Your Life (365daysofhystericalliving. blogspot.com), probably won't, but it's guaranteed to make you laugh. The site charts the progress of its anonymous author as he works his way through the pages of This Book Will Change Your Life - a zany manual filled with daily tasks guaranteed to break people out of their mundane routines. For one year, the fearless blogger has vowed to follow the book's instructions "as closely as possible without getting arrested or dying."
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | January 7, 1991
Carl Surland's skin is the color of his yellow teddy bear, without the pretty gold sheen.The 5-month-old lies next to the the stuffed animal in his crib in an intensive care unit at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He's been fighting since he drew breath, struggling to process his food with a liver that doesn't work.Now the tiny infant, not much bigger than his toy bear, sleeps on his back, linked to life by a maze of intravenous tubes, waiting for a new liver.The odds are against him. Born with a fatal liver disease, biliary atresia, Carl's body can't break down food.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1996
Every day in the United States someone is saved and transformed by a transplant. In fact, the transplant boom at hospitals like the University of Maryland have made getting a new body part seem almost routine. But for the 18,000 people who receive transplants each year, the experience is nothing short of a physical, emotional and spiritual rebirth."You have two birthdays. That's how you think of it," says Jerry Lebowitz, who received a new liver two years ago at the University of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Like any mother, Michelec Kehl of Bowleys Quarters wants her son, Jonathan, to be a normal, growing teen-ager -- one who can run, jump and revel in the excitement of rough-and-tumble sports.Until 1 1/2 years ago, Jonathan, 15, could do all this and more. Then, in August 1989, on the first family vacation in five years, he fractured his left hip in a water-skiing accident in Harford County.He's had surgery that did not work and has been diagnosed as having avascular osteo necrosis, or bone death, which is caused by a lack of blood flowing into his hip. He has spent most of the past two years on crutches.
SPORTS
By Mickey Herskowitz and Mickey Herskowitz,New York Times News Service | August 15, 1995
One fall, late in his storied career with the New York Yankees, Mickey Mantle drove with a friend to Fort Worth to watch a football game between the University of Texas and TCU.After the game, the friend suggested they stop by the Texas locker room and say hello to Darrell Royal. When the Texas coach shook his hand and said how pleased he was to meet him, Mantle grinned and ducked his head and said, "Darrell, we've met before."The embarrassed Royal said: "We have? When was that?""I was a senior in high school," came the reply, "and Bud Wilkinson tried to recruit me as a halfback to play football for Oklahoma.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli and Tania Ganguli,Tribune Newspapers | November 23, 2009
HOMESTEAD, Fla. - -It will take some time for the magnitude of what Jimmie Johnson and the No. 48 team accomplished at Homestead-Miami Speedway on Sunday to sink in for the men who made it happen. But Johnson knows it's big. Johnson, 34, won an unprecedented fourth consecutive championship. He joined Jeff Gordon, Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt Sr. as the only drivers to win at least four championships and broke a tie with Cale Yarborough, who won three consecutive championships.
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