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By New York Times Service | January 11, 1993
A 62-year-old man became the world's second recipient of a baboon liver at the University of Pittsburgh yesterday in a transplant that was part of an effort to overcome the species barrier and alleviate the growing shortage of organs from human donors.The patient was dying from hepatitis B, a virus that destroyed his liver, building up bile in his blood and giving his skin a deep yellow hue.But his chronic active hepatitis B infection would most likely infect a donated human liver, making him ineligible to receive a donated human organ at most transplant centers, including the University of Pittsburgh, officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 10, 2012
As an former Catonsville resident living overseas, I've experienced the advantages of having a national health care program. Five years ago I got a liver transplant here, making me a real-life German (liver)-American (heart). All my medical costs were covered by my German public health insurance policy. Everyone gets sick at some time in their life, which is why everyone will need health care sooner or later. When everyone pays in to such a health insurance plan, costs will come down and everyone will benefit.
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NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2001
JOHN HAFER JR. remembers when his life changed. An avid Ravens fan, he was getting ready to attend the game on New Year's Eve when he began spitting up blood. Instead of spending the day at the stadium watching football, he underwent tests at a hospital. The next day, he began the new year with the worst news of his life. The 42-year-old was diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis (HC). The disorder causes a person to absorb and retain too much iron from food and other sources. In Hafer's case, late detection of the disease allowed iron levels to reach toxic proportions, damaging about 90 percent of his liver and necessitating an organ transplant for survival.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Gene Cassidy thought he was lucky to survive being shot in the head twice 25 years ago when he was a Baltimore policeman, so a second near-death ordeal recently seemed unreal. Just 27 years old, Cassidy lost his sight after a man he was trying to arrest on an assault warrant fired at him. The shooting, and his survival, made Cassidy a legend in Baltimore police ranks and became fodder for "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," the book by David Simon, and later a TV series, about crime in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Gene Cassidy thought he was lucky to survive being shot in the head twice 25 years ago when he was a Baltimore policeman, so a second near-death ordeal recently seemed unreal. Just 27 years old, Cassidy lost his sight after a man he was trying to arrest on an assault warrant fired at him. The shooting, and his survival, made Cassidy a legend in Baltimore police ranks and became fodder for "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," the book by David Simon, and later a TV series, about crime in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Those who work in public safety consider themselves part of a brotherhood. But for the purposes of organ donation, a brother in blue may not be quite family enough, as Officer Gene Cassidy is finding out. Cassidy was shot in the head 27 years ago in West Baltimore, and though he survived, he contracted Hepatitis C during a blood transfusion and now has end-stage cirrhosis. Cassidy's deteriorating condition was profiled by "The Wire" creator David Simon in a March 11 article in The Baltimore Sun, with the call put out that someone could help by donating half of their liver.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Within the next day or two, Dr. Ronald Busuttil will sit down and compose a letter to the 250-plus patients on the University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center's liver transplant waiting list to explain why some of them will no longer be considered favored candidates for the life-saving operation.Busuttil's department -- one of the largest liver transplantation units in the country -- has been swamped with calls from anxious patients since Thursday's announcement of changes in the rules defining who gets priority for a liver transplant.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
HYATTSVILLE -- All Tom Dickman had to do to persuade his son, Chad, to change his mind was mention the magic name: Morgan Wootten.This was last summer, after Wootten, DeMatha High's celebrated basketball coach, had received a liver transplant. Dickman, a coach at Thomas Johnson High in Frederick, had taken Chad, 16, to get his driver's license.Dickman noticed that where the application asked if he wanted to be an organ donor, his son had checked no."I don't want to tell you what to do," Dickman said, "but remember Coach Wootten just had a liver transplant.
NEWS
March 6, 2005
On Thursday, March 3, 2005, BEVERLY ANN (nee Towers) MROZINSKI beloved wife of Bruce Stanley Mrozinski; devoted mother of Kimberly and William Mrozinski; loving daughter of Lee and Emma Towers; dear sister of Lee T. Towers Jr., dear niece of May Wright of St. Petersburg, Fl. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service will be held at the MILLER-DIPPEL FUNERAL HOME, Inc., 6415 Belair Road, at 1 P.M., Wednesday March 9. Interment Private. Those desiring may direct expressions of sympathy to the U.M.M.
SPORTS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 3, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Former Miami Dolphins quarterback David Woodley, feeling "almost like I've got a second chance at life," held a news conference yesterday, just four days after undergoing a liver transplant.With his doctors by his side, Woodley walked off an elevator at Willis-Knighton Medical Center in Shreveport, La., and spoke, along with his surgeon, Dr. Jim Piper, for about 20 minutes."I feel almost as good as before I went in," said Woodley, 33. "It's almost a miracle to me."
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 1, 2012
Starting today, users of the world's biggest social network will be able to declare their status as an organ donor -- just as easily as declaring their likes and relationship status -- in a move that could have a big impact in the organ transplant field. Facebook announced the news in a big media push this morning, with CEO Mark Zuckerberg appearing on Good Morning America to break the news. Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote about the effort in a blog post on the site . From their post: Today, more than 114,000 people in the United States, and millions more around the globe, are waiting for the heart, kidney or liver transplant that will save their lives.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Those who work in public safety consider themselves part of a brotherhood. But for the purposes of organ donation, a brother in blue may not be quite family enough, as Officer Gene Cassidy is finding out. Cassidy was shot in the head 27 years ago in West Baltimore, and though he survived, he contracted Hepatitis C during a blood transfusion and now has end-stage cirrhosis. Cassidy's deteriorating condition was profiled by "The Wire" creator David Simon in a March 11 article in The Baltimore Sun, with the call put out that someone could help by donating half of their liver.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
I would like to extend my sincerest thanks to David Simon and The Baltimore Sun for telling Gene Cassidy's remarkable story ("David Simon's 'Homicide' cop battling life on the streets once again," March 11). Gene is truly one of Baltimore's finest, ever. Sunday's article brought attention not only to this hometown hero but also to the need for living liver donors for Gene and others. The fortunate thing for those in need of a transplant is that the liver is one of only two organs that will regenerate if cut in half.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
The most comprehensive study ever on the link between organ donations and cancer is arming physicians with new data that could help make the procedures safer. Organ transplant patients get new kidneys, livers and lungs that save their lives, but they face a heightened risk of cancer because drugs that prevent the rejection of new organs also weaken the immune system. Most patients, like Jessica Protasio of Columbia, go through with transplants because the immediate risk of dying from failing organs outweighs the long-term risk of cancer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
A 28-year-old man flown to Maryland six months ago with a failing heart and liver expects to soon return to his Georgia home with healthy new organs, both transplanted during a surgery performed only a dozen other times this year across the country. The rare effort by University of Maryland doctors means David Krech, who was born with a heart defect and has endured many other procedures, may soon be planning a future as a schoolteacher. "The previous operations were stopgap measures, not a cure.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli and Tania Ganguli,Tribune Newspapers | November 23, 2009
HOMESTEAD, Fla. - -It will take some time for the magnitude of what Jimmie Johnson and the No. 48 team accomplished at Homestead-Miami Speedway on Sunday to sink in for the men who made it happen. But Johnson knows it's big. Johnson, 34, won an unprecedented fourth consecutive championship. He joined Jeff Gordon, Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt Sr. as the only drivers to win at least four championships and broke a tie with Cale Yarborough, who won three consecutive championships.
SPORTS
August 18, 1995
DALLAS -- The family of Mickey Mantle yesterday carried out his last wish, unveiling a new "organ donor" trading card with the baseball great's picture and autograph that will be passed out at major-league stadiums."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 6, 2002
Rich Beecher, who withdrew from Towson University last month to become a liver transplant donor for his uncle, underwent successful surgery yesterday at New York University Medical Center. Beecher, a 20-year-old sophomore who made Towson's lacrosse team this year before withdrawing, was listed in stable condition after 10 hours in the operating room. The liver recipient, Donald Beecher, 46, of Parish, N.Y., was still undergoing surgery last night, and was also listed as stable. The Glen Burnie native was found to have Stage II liver cancer last summer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2008
Dr. John Paul Burton, a retired oral and maxillofacial surgeon and businessman, died of kidney failure Saturday at Citizens Care and Rehabilitation Center in Havre de Grace. He was 75. Dr. Burton was born in Cowen, W.Va., and raised at Camp Caesar in Webster County, W.Va., where his father was camp director. He was a pre-med major at West Virginia University and earned his dental degree from the University of Maryland Dental School in 1956. "Dad never got an undergraduate degree from West Virginia University because in those days it was possible to go directly into dental school," said a son, Paul Steven Burton of Fayetteville, N.C. Dr. Burton served as an oral surgeon in the Navy from 1957 to 1961, attaining the rank of lieutenant.
NEWS
September 1, 2006
Benefit 5K walk, run is Sept. 16 The second Donate Life 5K Walk and Run to benefit the National Transplant Assistance Fund will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon Sept. 16 at Oakland Mills High School in Columbia. The event, which supports the Mid-Atlantic Liver Transplant Fund and honors Oakland Mills resident David Hillen, who recently had a liver transplant, is sponsored by the Oakland Mills High School PTSA and local businesses. The cost is $15 in advance; $17 at the gate. Information: Karen Hillen, 410-964-1175.
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