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By Drake Witham and Drake Witham,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 24, 1995
"Mom, will you help me sneak out of here? Will you help me get to basketball practice?"Cori Carson was in a hospital bed last fall, critically ill with liver failure, but all she wanted to do was get back to practice with her teammates at Marymount University in Arlington, Va.Carson, who played for the University of Maryland in 1989, is averaging 20 points at Division III Marymount this season and making it look easy. Compared with what she has been through the past 13 months, it is.She didn't feel like she was in danger of dying last year.
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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Hepatitis C has long been a problem with a low rate of cure. But new drug therapies are in use and others are on the horizon, according to Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath, chief of gastroenterology at Mercy Medical Center and the medical director of the Institute for Digestive Health & Liver Disease at Mercy. That has meant better liver health for millions in this country and around the globe. What is hepatitis C and what causes it? Hepatitis C (HCV) is a virus that causes liver disease in a significant number of the U.S. and world population.
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NEWS
October 14, 1993
Henry P. Walters, who practiced law in Pocomoke City for 55 years, died Monday of liver failure at the Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Mr. Walters, 79, began his practice in 1938. He was born in Pocomoke City and lived there all his life. Graveside services were set for 2 p.m. today in the Pitts Creek Presbyterian Cemetery in Pocomoke City.Charles A. Speas, retired vice president for research and development at a Baltimore company that makes plastic industrial containers, died Saturday at Manor Care Towson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center of complications to Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | October 26, 2007
When she regained consciousness after surgery, Megan Weber tried to mouth "What is it?" despite the breathing tube in her parched throat. Getting odd looks from her family, who had gathered around her hospital bed, she tried rocking an invisible infant in her arms and raising her eyebrows to communicate. Still groggy from residual anesthesia and sore from an abdominal incision, Weber thought she had given birth by Caesarean section. But there was no newborn baby. Weber, then 21, was not pregnant.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
Responding to reports of unexpected side effects, the maker of a popular new diabetes drug has changed its warning label and advised doctors to routinely monitor patients for liver complications.Parke Davis, the manufacturer of Rezulin, took the action after receiving reports of 35 people who experienced liver problems after taking the medication.The side effects ranged from mildly elevated blood levels of a liver enzyme to outright liver failure.One person required a liver transplant and another died of liver failure.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Within the next day or two, Dr. Ronald Busuttil will sit down and compose a letter to the 250-plus patients on the University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center's liver transplant waiting list to explain why some of them will no longer be considered favored candidates for the life-saving operation.Busuttil's department -- one of the largest liver transplantation units in the country -- has been swamped with calls from anxious patients since Thursday's announcement of changes in the rules defining who gets priority for a liver transplant.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
NASA will sign an "unprecedented" agreement today that will allow a newly formed Baltimore County company to try to commercialize a space-agency invention that simulates lack of gravity in space. The start-up hopes to develop techniques for treating liver failure and treatments for exotic infectious diseases. The space agency will license Baltimore County-based StelSys to use the patents associated with the machine, known as a microgravity bioreactor. In return, StelSys will pay NASA undisclosed licensing fees, as well as royalty payments from any sales that result from the technology.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
For more than a year, StelSys LLC of Baltimore County has mimicked the effects of space in an earthly machine, developing techniques that could one day assist people with liver failure and other ailments. Today, it is scheduled to launch an experiment aboard the space shuttle Endeavour that will allow it to compare the results with those achieved using the gold standard - space itself. The relatively simple experiment, to be conducted aboard the International Space Station, is one result of a longtime NASA effort to encourage commercial use of space.
NEWS
December 17, 1999
Karen Boughter Dunn, 58, executive assistantKaren Boughter Dunn, an executive assistant who retired to travel and play duplicate bridge, died Dec. 9 of heart failure at her residence in Homeland. She was 58.A native of Pittsburgh, she attended college before moving to Baltimore, where she worked for Westinghouse Corp. and Crown Oil Co. before taking a job in the mid-1970s as an executive assistant with Alexander & Alexander insurance company. She retired in 1996.She enjoyed traveling, especially to Atlantic City, and devoted much of her time to duplicate bridge.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Hepatitis C has long been a problem with a low rate of cure. But new drug therapies are in use and others are on the horizon, according to Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath, chief of gastroenterology at Mercy Medical Center and the medical director of the Institute for Digestive Health & Liver Disease at Mercy. That has meant better liver health for millions in this country and around the globe. What is hepatitis C and what causes it? Hepatitis C (HCV) is a virus that causes liver disease in a significant number of the U.S. and world population.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 28, 2002
ANOTHER SCHOOL year begins in Baltimore County, and Stephanie Brittingham attends by telephone. Her teachers came to her Parkville house Monday, gave her books and set up a speaker phone on the desk in her bedroom. Yesterday, Stephanie dialed up a science lesson at 10 a.m., math at 11 and social studies at 1 in the afternoon. She's a sixth-grader who won't see the inside of a classroom or study with classmates this year, and that's how it goes when you're 11 and tethered to an intravenous tube, on the long end of a wait for an organ transplant.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
For more than a year, StelSys LLC of Baltimore County has mimicked the effects of space in an earthly machine, developing techniques that could one day assist people with liver failure and other ailments. Today, it is scheduled to launch an experiment aboard the space shuttle Endeavour that will allow it to compare the results with those achieved using the gold standard - space itself. The relatively simple experiment, to be conducted aboard the International Space Station, is one result of a longtime NASA effort to encourage commercial use of space.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
NASA will sign an "unprecedented" agreement today that will allow a newly formed Baltimore County company to try to commercialize a space-agency invention that simulates lack of gravity in space. The start-up hopes to develop techniques for treating liver failure and treatments for exotic infectious diseases. The space agency will license Baltimore County-based StelSys to use the patents associated with the machine, known as a microgravity bioreactor. In return, StelSys will pay NASA undisclosed licensing fees, as well as royalty payments from any sales that result from the technology.
NEWS
December 17, 1999
Karen Boughter Dunn, 58, executive assistantKaren Boughter Dunn, an executive assistant who retired to travel and play duplicate bridge, died Dec. 9 of heart failure at her residence in Homeland. She was 58.A native of Pittsburgh, she attended college before moving to Baltimore, where she worked for Westinghouse Corp. and Crown Oil Co. before taking a job in the mid-1970s as an executive assistant with Alexander & Alexander insurance company. She retired in 1996.She enjoyed traveling, especially to Atlantic City, and devoted much of her time to duplicate bridge.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
Responding to reports of unexpected side effects, the maker of a popular new diabetes drug has changed its warning label and advised doctors to routinely monitor patients for liver complications.Parke Davis, the manufacturer of Rezulin, took the action after receiving reports of 35 people who experienced liver problems after taking the medication.The side effects ranged from mildly elevated blood levels of a liver enzyme to outright liver failure.One person required a liver transplant and another died of liver failure.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Within the next day or two, Dr. Ronald Busuttil will sit down and compose a letter to the 250-plus patients on the University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center's liver transplant waiting list to explain why some of them will no longer be considered favored candidates for the life-saving operation.Busuttil's department -- one of the largest liver transplantation units in the country -- has been swamped with calls from anxious patients since Thursday's announcement of changes in the rules defining who gets priority for a liver transplant.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 28, 2002
ANOTHER SCHOOL year begins in Baltimore County, and Stephanie Brittingham attends by telephone. Her teachers came to her Parkville house Monday, gave her books and set up a speaker phone on the desk in her bedroom. Yesterday, Stephanie dialed up a science lesson at 10 a.m., math at 11 and social studies at 1 in the afternoon. She's a sixth-grader who won't see the inside of a classroom or study with classmates this year, and that's how it goes when you're 11 and tethered to an intravenous tube, on the long end of a wait for an organ transplant.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | July 22, 1992
A 35-YEAR-OLD man dying of liver failure received a transplant on June 29.There is nothing especially newsworthy about that, since there are more than 2,000 liver transplants performed each year in the United States.What was remarkable was that the liver came from a baboon. This was the first attempt to use a liver from a baboon in a human recipient. So far, the transplant seems to be going well.While it is still too early to say that the experiment is a success, it is not too early to examine the morality of this experiment with a baboon liver.
SPORTS
By Drake Witham and Drake Witham,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 24, 1995
"Mom, will you help me sneak out of here? Will you help me get to basketball practice?"Cori Carson was in a hospital bed last fall, critically ill with liver failure, but all she wanted to do was get back to practice with her teammates at Marymount University in Arlington, Va.Carson, who played for the University of Maryland in 1989, is averaging 20 points at Division III Marymount this season and making it look easy. Compared with what she has been through the past 13 months, it is.She didn't feel like she was in danger of dying last year.
NEWS
October 14, 1993
Henry P. Walters, who practiced law in Pocomoke City for 55 years, died Monday of liver failure at the Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Mr. Walters, 79, began his practice in 1938. He was born in Pocomoke City and lived there all his life. Graveside services were set for 2 p.m. today in the Pitts Creek Presbyterian Cemetery in Pocomoke City.Charles A. Speas, retired vice president for research and development at a Baltimore company that makes plastic industrial containers, died Saturday at Manor Care Towson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center of complications to Parkinson's disease.
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