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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Dr. Thomas Russell Hendrix, a leader in the fields of gastric and liver disease, died of complications from heart surgery Dec. 23 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 93 and lived in Roland Park before moving to Chestertown. Dr. Hendrix, who pioneered studies in gluten intolerance, swallowing disorders and diarrheal disease, led his department at Hopkins for 31 years. "He had patients from all over the world," said his son, Paul Hendrix, also of Chestertown. "He was the gastroenterologist of last resort.
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NEWS
May 7, 2014
My older cat seems more lethargic than usual. What might be causing this? As cats age, many develop associated geriatric disorders, as people do. Often, these age-related issues can creep up so slowly that they go almost unnoticed, or are simply attributed to the inevitable passage of time. And while some geriatric conditions are indeed simply the natural order of things, there are a variety of ailments that can detract from a pet's quality of life but are treatable. That's why we highly recommend exams twice a year and more intensive annual screenings for pets over 7 years old, so we know exactly what's going on with our furry friends.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 27, 2007
J.B., the 18-year-old lioness at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, was euthanized after veterinarians diagnosed her with liver disease, zoo officials announced yesterday. The lion's keepers first noticed J.B. was ill March 17 when her appetite decreased and she appeared lethargic, said Rebecca Gullott, the zoo's mammal collection and conservation manager. "Our animal keepers know their individual animals extremely well and are able to detect anything different about them," Gullott said. "She was a little bit lethargic and just looked not herself."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Dr. Thomas Russell Hendrix, a leader in the fields of gastric and liver disease, died of complications from heart surgery Dec. 23 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 93 and lived in Roland Park before moving to Chestertown. Dr. Hendrix, who pioneered studies in gluten intolerance, swallowing disorders and diarrheal disease, led his department at Hopkins for 31 years. "He had patients from all over the world," said his son, Paul Hendrix, also of Chestertown. "He was the gastroenterologist of last resort.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Hepatitis C has long been a problem with a low rate of cure. But new drug therapies are in use and others are on the horizon, according to Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath, chief of gastroenterology at Mercy Medical Center and the medical director of the Institute for Digestive Health & Liver Disease at Mercy. That has meant better liver health for millions in this country and around the globe. What is hepatitis C and what causes it? Hepatitis C (HCV) is a virus that causes liver disease in a significant number of the U.S. and world population.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
My older cat seems more lethargic than usual. What might be causing this? As cats age, many develop associated geriatric disorders, as people do. Often, these age-related issues can creep up so slowly that they go almost unnoticed, or are simply attributed to the inevitable passage of time. And while some geriatric conditions are indeed simply the natural order of things, there are a variety of ailments that can detract from a pet's quality of life but are treatable. That's why we highly recommend exams twice a year and more intensive annual screenings for pets over 7 years old, so we know exactly what's going on with our furry friends.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 16, 2012
All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis C, the virus that can lead to liver disease, cancer and death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . One in 30 boomers is infected and most don't know -- read about that in this Sun's story on hep C . In making the recommendation, CDC officials believe raising awareness and testing will avert more disease and deaths. It's now the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths and a leading cause of liver transplants.)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
Overshadowed by AIDS, a silent epidemic of hepatitis C is sweeping through Baltimore's population of intravenous drug users -- threatening many with liver failure and cancer decades after they were first infected.Recent studies by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health show that well over 90 percent of the city's addicts are infected with the virus. The rate among young addicts who are less than five years into drug use is 58 percent -- stark evidence of how rapidly this virus is traveling among people who share needles.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2001
JOHN HAFER JR. remembers when his life changed. An avid Ravens fan, he was getting ready to attend the game on New Year's Eve when he began spitting up blood. Instead of spending the day at the stadium watching football, he underwent tests at a hospital. The next day, he began the new year with the worst news of his life. The 42-year-old was diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis (HC). The disorder causes a person to absorb and retain too much iron from food and other sources. In Hafer's case, late detection of the disease allowed iron levels to reach toxic proportions, damaging about 90 percent of his liver and necessitating an organ transplant for survival.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
When Alan Shackelford's ankles would swell up, he brushed it off as another sign of getting older — only to find out it was a symptom of something much worse. The 59-year-old Windsor Mill man was shocked when his doctor recently diagnosed him with hepatitis C. Even more disturbing to the IT specialist at Johns Hopkins University was that he had probably been living with the disease for years. "I was completely freaked out that this had happened to me and I probably had this for 35 to 40 years," Shackelford said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
You don't have to be a heavy drinker to suffer from liver problems. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become the most common chronic liver disease in all developed countries, including the United States, says Dr. Srinevas K. Reddy, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a liver surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The disease is associated with overeating rather than drinking too much alcohol. The number of people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is steadily increasing and is on pace to become the most common cause of primary liver cancer and liver transplantation by 2025, Reddy says.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 16, 2012
All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis C, the virus that can lead to liver disease, cancer and death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . One in 30 boomers is infected and most don't know -- read about that in this Sun's story on hep C . In making the recommendation, CDC officials believe raising awareness and testing will avert more disease and deaths. It's now the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths and a leading cause of liver transplants.)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
When Alan Shackelford's ankles would swell up, he brushed it off as another sign of getting older — only to find out it was a symptom of something much worse. The 59-year-old Windsor Mill man was shocked when his doctor recently diagnosed him with hepatitis C. Even more disturbing to the IT specialist at Johns Hopkins University was that he had probably been living with the disease for years. "I was completely freaked out that this had happened to me and I probably had this for 35 to 40 years," Shackelford said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Hepatitis C has long been a problem with a low rate of cure. But new drug therapies are in use and others are on the horizon, according to Dr. Paul J. Thuluvath, chief of gastroenterology at Mercy Medical Center and the medical director of the Institute for Digestive Health & Liver Disease at Mercy. That has meant better liver health for millions in this country and around the globe. What is hepatitis C and what causes it? Hepatitis C (HCV) is a virus that causes liver disease in a significant number of the U.S. and world population.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Jill Palkovitz, a dressmaker who was described as a "natural designer," died of liver disease Monday at Long Green Center. The Roland Park resident was 50. Born Marcia Jill Hughes in Midland, Texas, she was a graduate of Stanton High School in Stanton, Texas, and earned a degree at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas. She also attended Texas Tech University at Lubbock, where she studied linguistics, and had a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. "She was a bit of Texas air in Baltimore City," said Connie Fitzpatrick, a close friend and neighbor.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 27, 2007
J.B., the 18-year-old lioness at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, was euthanized after veterinarians diagnosed her with liver disease, zoo officials announced yesterday. The lion's keepers first noticed J.B. was ill March 17 when her appetite decreased and she appeared lethargic, said Rebecca Gullott, the zoo's mammal collection and conservation manager. "Our animal keepers know their individual animals extremely well and are able to detect anything different about them," Gullott said. "She was a little bit lethargic and just looked not herself."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Jill Palkovitz, a dressmaker who was described as a "natural designer," died of liver disease Monday at Long Green Center. The Roland Park resident was 50. Born Marcia Jill Hughes in Midland, Texas, she was a graduate of Stanton High School in Stanton, Texas, and earned a degree at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas. She also attended Texas Tech University at Lubbock, where she studied linguistics, and had a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. "She was a bit of Texas air in Baltimore City," said Connie Fitzpatrick, a close friend and neighbor.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
You don't have to be a heavy drinker to suffer from liver problems. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become the most common chronic liver disease in all developed countries, including the United States, says Dr. Srinevas K. Reddy, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a liver surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The disease is associated with overeating rather than drinking too much alcohol. The number of people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is steadily increasing and is on pace to become the most common cause of primary liver cancer and liver transplantation by 2025, Reddy says.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2001
JOHN HAFER JR. remembers when his life changed. An avid Ravens fan, he was getting ready to attend the game on New Year's Eve when he began spitting up blood. Instead of spending the day at the stadium watching football, he underwent tests at a hospital. The next day, he began the new year with the worst news of his life. The 42-year-old was diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis (HC). The disorder causes a person to absorb and retain too much iron from food and other sources. In Hafer's case, late detection of the disease allowed iron levels to reach toxic proportions, damaging about 90 percent of his liver and necessitating an organ transplant for survival.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
Overshadowed by AIDS, a silent epidemic of hepatitis C is sweeping through Baltimore's population of intravenous drug users -- threatening many with liver failure and cancer decades after they were first infected.Recent studies by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health show that well over 90 percent of the city's addicts are infected with the virus. The rate among young addicts who are less than five years into drug use is 58 percent -- stark evidence of how rapidly this virus is traveling among people who share needles.
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