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By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
"Liver and onions - the poor man's gourmet delight. " - Stevens Bunker, retired Baltimore sea dog The taste sensation of beef liver is like licking a piece of smooth, shiny metal. To the bite, the texture is akin to corduroy - wide wale and brown - and leaves a subtle film across your tongue and the roof of your mouth. Liver and onions - a staple of working-class communities with strong German heritage, and therefore an old favorite in old Baltimore - endures here as a savory snapshot of the way our grandparents ate. "It reminds me of shopping with my Nonnie, my Italian grandmother," said Kathleen Birrane of Dulaney Valley of adventures some 40 years ago at the Pantry Pride in Mount Washington.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Dr. Thomas Russell Hendrix, a leader in the fields of gastric and liver disease, died of complications from heart surgery Dec. 23 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 93 and lived in Roland Park before moving to Chestertown. Dr. Hendrix, who pioneered studies in gluten intolerance, swallowing disorders and diarrheal disease, led his department at Hopkins for 31 years. "He had patients from all over the world," said his son, Paul Hendrix, also of Chestertown. "He was the gastroenterologist of last resort.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 16, 1994
Q: One of my friends, who has been treated for depression in the past, tried to commit suicide by taking a bunch of acetaminophen tablets. Even though they finally let her go home, she had a lot of blood tests and the doctors seemed quite worried.I don't understand why, since this medicine is sold everywhere and I've never heard of anyone getting sick from taking it. In fact, whenever I get a viral infection my doctor always tells me to use acetaminophen rather than aspirin.A: When used according to the directions on the bottle or package, acetaminophen is, as you have written, very safe.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
You don't have to be a heavy drinker to suffer from liver problems. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become the most common chronic liver disease in all developed countries, including the United States, says Dr. Srinevas K. Reddy, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a liver surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The disease is associated with overeating rather than drinking too much alcohol. The number of people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is steadily increasing and is on pace to become the most common cause of primary liver cancer and liver transplantation by 2025, Reddy says.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
Surgeons at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have transplanted sections of a single liver into a teen-ager and a toddler whose lives were threatened by dangerously long waits for organs to replace their own diseased livers.The technique, first tried in France five years ago, is one of several ways surgeons are coping with the lack of sufficient donor organs to meet the burgeoning number of patients awaiting transplants.The operations, performed almost a month ago, marked the first time in Maryland that a transplant center had used the split-liver method for two patients in need.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
The surgery to transplant more than half of Rich Beecher's liver into his ailing uncle was deemed "a complete success" yesterday by Dr. Lewis Teperman, director of transplantation at New York University Medical Center. It drew a thumbs-up seal of approval from both Beecher, the donor, and his uncle, Don Beecher, the recipient. "Both of them gave me the thumbs-up sign [after Tuesday's surgery]," said Richard Beecher Sr., father of the donor and Don's brother. "It's fantastic everybody came out of it OK. They were concerned about the cancer spreading."
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 9, 2011
Last week I fessed up to employing a pina colada to mask the taste of shad roe. I recounted that tense moment socially when the rest of the room was praising this old Maryland culinary springtime dish, but I was in agony. As it turned out, there were others who found themselves in a proper dining room with a plate of dubious delicacy in front of them. What do you do? I heard from E. Christian Mattson, who offered this suggestion: "I grew up in Highlandtown and my mother, being Italian, served us wonderful dishes.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Morgan Wootten, who has compiled a 1,094-163 record in 40 seasons as basketball coach at Hyattsville's DeMatha High, has cirrhosis of the liver and is a "high priority" candidate for a transplant.Wootten is in Johns Hopkins Hospital after collapsing Sunday at his basketball camp at Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg. He has had a diseased liver, believed to be the result of an inherited condition, for years and has been on a transplant list since April, but recent internal bleeding has made his condition critical.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Cells that develop into the liver can also give rise to part of the pancreas, according to researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center here. The finding counters the assumption that during the early stages of mammalian development, the liver and pancreas cells develop from separate lineages. Kenneth S. Zaret and his research team had originally been studying the development of the liver in mouse embryos and then discovered that the ventral part of the pancreas develops at the same time as the liver and from the same type of endoderm cells.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The many good reasons to check out Miller's Deli in the Greenspring Shopping Center are written on the restaurant's wall. The big menu lists items that can carry you from breakfast through dinner. And liver and onions ($9.99), well, Miller's has that, too. The deep, foamy plastic plate felt like it weighed five pounds. On it, buried under easily a heaping cup of translucent onion strips, were two fairly thin slabs of fried liver, about six inches long and 4 inches wide. But let's talk mashed potatoes, which came with the platter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
"Liver and onions - the poor man's gourmet delight. " - Stevens Bunker, retired Baltimore sea dog The taste sensation of beef liver is like licking a piece of smooth, shiny metal. To the bite, the texture is akin to corduroy - wide wale and brown - and leaves a subtle film across your tongue and the roof of your mouth. Liver and onions - a staple of working-class communities with strong German heritage, and therefore an old favorite in old Baltimore - endures here as a savory snapshot of the way our grandparents ate. "It reminds me of shopping with my Nonnie, my Italian grandmother," said Kathleen Birrane of Dulaney Valley of adventures some 40 years ago at the Pantry Pride in Mount Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Think of Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry as intellectual magpies. The glittery ideas they filch from fields as diverse as swing dancing, systems analysis, water skiing and medicine seemingly have little in common. But Segev and Gentry weave them together into a strong yet flexible structure designed to protect fragile lives. Segev, 41, is a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a pianist who studied at Juilliard and a former computer prodigy. Gentry, 35, an assistant mathematics professor at the Naval Academy, was a doctoral student when she caught the public's attention by designing a dancing robot.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Gene Cassidy thought he was lucky to survive being shot in the head twice 25 years ago when he was a Baltimore policeman, so a second near-death ordeal recently seemed unreal. Just 27 years old, Cassidy lost his sight after a man he was trying to arrest on an assault warrant fired at him. The shooting, and his survival, made Cassidy a legend in Baltimore police ranks and became fodder for "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," the book by David Simon, and later a TV series, about crime in Baltimore.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Saint Agnes Hospital is proud to announce the launch of The Hodes Liver & Pancreas Center, Saint Agnes Hospital's newest expansion of services.  The Center will be led by Dr. Mark Fraiman, a hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgeon, who is one of the few doctors in the area performing highly complex procedures for the treatment of liver and pancreas diseases, and is regionally recognized as an expert in the Whipple surgery - a procedure which removes...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 2, 2012
Those with type II diabetes are at two to three times the risk of developing primary liver cancer. But new research from the University of Maryland shows that a common drug many patients already take may prevent the cancer. Studies on animals show that the diabetes drug metformin may help prevent liver tumors from growing. Primary liver cancer is often deadly and is on the rise, according to researchers at Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center . The drug could benefit diabetics as well as others at risk for primary liver cancer, including those who are obese, have hepatitis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Those who work in public safety consider themselves part of a brotherhood. But for the purposes of organ donation, a brother in blue may not be quite family enough, as Officer Gene Cassidy is finding out. Cassidy was shot in the head 27 years ago in West Baltimore, and though he survived, he contracted Hepatitis C during a blood transfusion and now has end-stage cirrhosis. Cassidy's deteriorating condition was profiled by "The Wire" creator David Simon in a March 11 article in The Baltimore Sun, with the call put out that someone could help by donating half of their liver.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Rich Beecher spent the past year chasing a dream to play for Towson University's lacrosse team. The dream led him to a 100-foot-high scaffold, where he videotaped team practices and games. It took him on daily three-mile runs around campus. It sent him to a summer league in search of more playing time. It was a dream that pushed him through all sorts of physical endeavors to become quicker, more agile and 25 pounds lighter. Little did he know that his labor of love would wind up serving a greater cause - saving his uncle's life.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
Ultimate indulgences. Every era has its favorites. In the '80s, it was champagne and steak tartare. In the '90s, single-malt scotch and Cuban cigars. In the 'Aughties, well, whatever culinary naughties become emblematic of the decade, you probably won't lose by placing your money on foie gras. And place your money you must, because this duck- or goose-liver delicacy that traces its gastronomical history to the ancient Egyptians has always been an expensive treat. This is certainly true in the United States, where in the 19th century, variations of the dish were staples of such great (and some say gluttonous)
NEWS
March 16, 2012
I would like to extend my sincerest thanks to David Simon and The Baltimore Sun for telling Gene Cassidy's remarkable story ("David Simon's 'Homicide' cop battling life on the streets once again," March 11). Gene is truly one of Baltimore's finest, ever. Sunday's article brought attention not only to this hometown hero but also to the need for living liver donors for Gene and others. The fortunate thing for those in need of a transplant is that the liver is one of only two organs that will regenerate if cut in half.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The many good reasons to check out Miller's Deli in the Greenspring Shopping Center are written on the restaurant's wall. The big menu lists items that can carry you from breakfast through dinner. And liver and onions ($9.99), well, Miller's has that, too. The deep, foamy plastic plate felt like it weighed five pounds. On it, buried under easily a heaping cup of translucent onion strips, were two fairly thin slabs of fried liver, about six inches long and 4 inches wide. But let's talk mashed potatoes, which came with the platter.
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