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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 18, 1997
Say that you own a company that has, over the years, done quite a lot of business in and with the state of Maryland. In fact, the State Retirement and Pension System recently invested in a large piece of your company's stock. So, to show your appreciation to Maryland and its people, you had a CD made of "Maryland, My Maryland," which your sales staff distributed to customers and public schools across the state.Congratulations. By the terms of House Bill 718 -- the "gangsta rap" divestiture bill -- the State Retirement and Pension System may no longer invest in your company.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Lawrence E. Paradis, a retired cameraman whose career with WMAR-TV spanned nearly four decades, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Kingsville home. He was 87. Lawrence Ernest Paradis was born and raised in Groton, Conn., where he graduated in 1943 from Fitch High School. After high school, Mr. Paradis enlisted in the Marine Corps and he served in the Pacific theater as a radio operator. He fought at Peleliu and the Philippines and, near the end of the war, was attached to the fabled 6th Marine Division, helping to secure Tokyo Bay. Discharged with the rank of corporal in 1946, Mr. Paradis moved to Chicago, where he enrolled in the Lee De Forest Radio and Television School, earning his FCC radio and television licenses.
NEWS
By Mark R. Littleton and Mark R. Littleton,Mark R. Littleton writes from Columbia | October 10, 1990
THE rap group 2 Live Crew, Andrew "the Diceman" Clay and Roseanne Barr have pioneered on the frontier of ugly, nasty and contemptuous. As entertainers of different sorts, they ply their wares, and some seem to love it.What are we to do about it? Let them continue, or do we shut them down, turn off their stream of venom and lock their ideas -- if you want to call them ideas -- away in some hole never to be exhumed till death do us part?As a believer in such biblical ideas as respect for others, showing honor and loving your neighbor as yourself, I'm on the horns of a dilemma.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 2000
Tomorrow, on Ray Lewis' 25th birthday, characters will converge in an unfolding drama that mixes pro football, celebrity, money, politics, rap music, wild parties, street brawling and homicide. Performing in an Atlanta courtroom will be some of the city's sharpest legal minds, including a smooth lawyer born to Southern gentry and a pony-tailed, tattooed maverick. Jurors and TV viewers will peer into a world of rap artists, hairstylists and small-time criminals, where a famous limousine, a mink coat and a champagne bottle figure in the fatal stabbings of two young men."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | October 20, 1992
In August, a federal judge upheld a worker-compensation ruling that awarded a 64-year-old Florida woman $50,000 in disability benefits because she had developed a phobia concerning black people and thus was unable to work with them.The woman, Ruth Jandrucko, had been mugged by a black man while out on business in 1986. Doctors, co-workers and supervisors testified on behalf of Mrs. Jandrucko, who is white, that she had harbored no prejudices against blacks before the mugging.Coincidentally, a Maryland administrative law judge in August upheld the firing of an equal opportunity officer at the state Department of Agriculture who seemingly had become unable to work with white males.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff | June 26, 1991
In the covenant-happy city of Columbia, where a Thunder Hill resident was forced by his community association to repaint his front door aless-offensive color than purple, I found the display in front of the Covenant Baptist Church near Cedar Acres numbing."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | October 4, 1990
Maryland record store owners and lawyers involved in First Amendment issues reacted with dismay yesterday to the conviction of a Florida record store owner on obscenity charges.And those familiar with state law say that similar prosecutions could happen here, though none could recall successful prosecutions in the last several years under local obscenity statutes."I am so offended," said Mike Richman, owner/manager of the four-store Recordmasters chain, reacting to the conviction of Charles Freeman, who sold a copy of 2 Live Crew's "Nasty As They Wanna Be" album to an undercover policeman in June, prompting the charges.
FEATURES
September 25, 1990
Report on Mrs. BushBarbara Bush dipped into Sidney Sheldon and Scott Turow over the summer, took a fancy to television's "America's Funniest Home Videos" but was baffled by Bart Simpson and his acid-tongued cartoon family. "It was the dumbest thing I have ever seen, but it's a family thing, and I guess it's clean," she said in a recent interview in People magazine. During her summer vacation in Kennebunkport, Maine, the first lady said she found time to work out daily and catch up on her reading,Star wars?
NEWS
January 1, 1994
In the 5th century B.C., the Greek philosopher Socrates warned his fellow citizens of Athens that unsupervised access to the popular music of the day would surely corrupt the morals of the city's youth. The authorities duly noted Socrates' complaint, then decided that it was he, with his iconoclastic wit, who posed the greater risk and forced him to drink hemlock.Mindful of the philosopher's fate, we are reluctant to broach the subject again. But there's been no shortage recently of critics who blame today's popular music -- particularly the in-your-face, rhyming genre known as "gangsta rap" -- for much of today's violence, bigotry and misogyny.
NEWS
November 13, 1990
Cable News Network did the prudent thing in agreeing not to broadcast again tapes of Gen. Manuel Noriega talking to his lawyers' office until the issue of CNN's right to do so has been settled by the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court must act soon. Even press critics who believe CNN was wrong to broadcast the tape know in their hearts that a greater wrong was the issuance by Judge William Hoeveler in Miami of an order forbidding it to broadcast. That order must be vacated.We have no doubt it will be. It is widely understood by legal scholars specializing in free speech issues and by jurists that only in extreme cases -- reporting troop or ship movements in wartime, for example -- is prior restraint permissible.
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