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FEATURES
By VALLI HERMAN and VALLI HERMAN,Los Angeles Daily News | September 12, 1990
LOS ANGELES Any awards show that manages to mix the Partridge Family with 2 Live Crew and Magic Johnson with Madonna promises to deliver a parade of fashion eclecticism.The only fashion theme missing from the 1990 MTV Awards, last week at the Universal Amphitheatre, was old-fashioned elegant, glamour. In a kaleidoscopic jumble of color, flash and fashion, performers and presenters proved that this is indeed an increasingly visual medium.Clearly, broadcast rock is changing the standard sight, sound and spectacle formula of rock 'n' roll and giving spectacle the lead.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 18, 1997
Say that you own a company that has, over the years, done quite a lot of business in and with the state of Maryland. In fact, the State Retirement and Pension System recently invested in a large piece of your company's stock. So, to show your appreciation to Maryland and its people, you had a CD made of "Maryland, My Maryland," which your sales staff distributed to customers and public schools across the state.Congratulations. By the terms of House Bill 718 -- the "gangsta rap" divestiture bill -- the State Retirement and Pension System may no longer invest in your company.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Lawrence E. Paradis, a retired cameraman whose career with WMAR-TV spanned nearly four decades, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Kingsville home. He was 87. Lawrence Ernest Paradis was born and raised in Groton, Conn., where he graduated in 1943 from Fitch High School. After high school, Mr. Paradis enlisted in the Marine Corps and he served in the Pacific theater as a radio operator. He fought at Peleliu and the Philippines and, near the end of the war, was attached to the fabled 6th Marine Division, helping to secure Tokyo Bay. Discharged with the rank of corporal in 1946, Mr. Paradis moved to Chicago, where he enrolled in the Lee De Forest Radio and Television School, earning his FCC radio and television licenses.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Staff Writer ! | August 16, 1992
BOCA RATON, Fla.--It's Sunday -- 2 in the afternoon, to be exact -- and the blazing sun is bouncing sparks off the water shimmering in the pool. There's a Sunday-afternoon stillness outside. And the view through the soaring glass walls of this spectacular house is peaceful, almost bucolic: lush green grass, electric-blue skies and motionless, high banks of pearl-colored clouds.Inside, however, the pace is quite different.For one thing, a newspaper photographer is at the front door. For another, an ABC "PrimeTime Live" crew sent by Diane Sawyer is on its way. Then there's a reporter setting up a tape recorder in the living room and, somewhere in another room, there are sounds of a fax machine faxing and a phone ringing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | July 16, 2000
Looks like the traditional July Fourth party that Tony Hawkins and Paula Rome throw at their summer home on the Magothy River was another big success. And we do mean big. The retired Rouse Company VP and his PR whiz wife have been throwing the summer shindig for 15 years now. This year, about 100 friends and family attended, including: Baltimore tourism chief Carroll Armstrong with wife Barbara and mom Margaret; former city housing boss Dan Henson, wife Del and her mom; the Polo Grill's Gail and Lenny Kaplan; HUD bigwig Elinor Bacon; and Tony's closest friend, Warren Carroll, and four generations of his family.
FEATURES
By Aaron Epstein and Aaron Epstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Entertainer Bette Midler summoned her lawyers after an advertising agency hired a sound-alike singer to evoke yuppie memories by imitating Ms. Midler's "Do You Want to Dance?" for a Mercury Sable commercial.Singer Tom Waits heard an imitator of his gravelly voice sing the praises of SalsaRio Doritos and became increasingly incensed by what he called "this corn chip sermon."One-role personality Vanna White sued the creators of an ad that put a blond robot in a TV game show.Ms.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff | June 26, 1991
In the covenant-happy city of Columbia, where a Thunder Hill resident was forced by his community association to repaint his front door aless-offensive color than purple, I found the display in front of the Covenant Baptist Church near Cedar Acres numbing."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | October 4, 1990
Maryland record store owners and lawyers involved in First Amendment issues reacted with dismay yesterday to the conviction of a Florida record store owner on obscenity charges.And those familiar with state law say that similar prosecutions could happen here, though none could recall successful prosecutions in the last several years under local obscenity statutes."I am so offended," said Mike Richman, owner/manager of the four-store Recordmasters chain, reacting to the conviction of Charles Freeman, who sold a copy of 2 Live Crew's "Nasty As They Wanna Be" album to an undercover policeman in June, prompting the charges.
FEATURES
September 25, 1990
Report on Mrs. BushBarbara Bush dipped into Sidney Sheldon and Scott Turow over the summer, took a fancy to television's "America's Funniest Home Videos" but was baffled by Bart Simpson and his acid-tongued cartoon family. "It was the dumbest thing I have ever seen, but it's a family thing, and I guess it's clean," she said in a recent interview in People magazine. During her summer vacation in Kennebunkport, Maine, the first lady said she found time to work out daily and catch up on her reading,Star wars?
NEWS
January 1, 1994
In the 5th century B.C., the Greek philosopher Socrates warned his fellow citizens of Athens that unsupervised access to the popular music of the day would surely corrupt the morals of the city's youth. The authorities duly noted Socrates' complaint, then decided that it was he, with his iconoclastic wit, who posed the greater risk and forced him to drink hemlock.Mindful of the philosopher's fate, we are reluctant to broach the subject again. But there's been no shortage recently of critics who blame today's popular music -- particularly the in-your-face, rhyming genre known as "gangsta rap" -- for much of today's violence, bigotry and misogyny.
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